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Found 108 results

  1. Night witnessing group in Orange County, CA, USA. Night witnessing group in Orange County, CA USA http://ift.tt/2bkFG8a Via
  2. Until Sunday, visitors to Calaveras Big Trees State Park could walk through the tunnel in the Pioneer Cabin Tree. A powerful winter storm in California has brought down an ancient tree, carved into a living tunnel more than a century ago. The "Pioneer Cabin Tree," a sequoia in Calaveras Big Trees State Park, saw horses and cars pass through it over the years. More recently, only hikers were allowed to walk through the massive tree. Over the weekend, a powerful winter storm slammed into California and Nevada, prompting flooding and mudslides in some regions. The Associated Press reports it might be the biggest storm to hit the region in more than a decade. On Sunday, a volunteer at the state park reported that Pioneer Cabin had not survived. "The storm was just too much for it," the Calaveras Big Tree Association wrote on Facebook. It's unclear exactly how old the tree was, but The Los Angeles Times reports that the trees in the state park are estimated to be more than 1,000 years old. Sequoias can live for more than 3,000 years. The iconic tree was one of just a few tunneled-through sequoias in California. The most famous was the Wawona Tree, in Yosemite National Park; it fell during a winter storm in 1969 at an estimated age of 2,100 years. The other remaining sequoia tunnels are dead or consist of logs on their side, the Forest Service says. However, there are still three coastal redwoods (taller and more slender than sequoias) with tunnels cut through them. They're all operated by private companies, the Forest Service says, and still allow cars to drive through — one appeared in a recent Geico ad. SFGate.com spoke to Jim Allday, the volunteer who reported Pioneer Cabin's demise. He told the website that the tree "shattered" when it hit the ground on Sunday afternoon, and that people had walked through it as recently as that morning. An 1899 stereograph shows the Pioneer Cabin sequoia in Calaveras Grove, Calif. Local flooding might have been the reason the tree fell, SFGate reports: " 'When I went out there [Sunday afternoon], the trail was literally a river, the trail is washed out,' Allday said. 'I could see the tree on the ground, it looked like it was laying in a pond or lake with a river running through it.' " "The tree had been among the most popular features of the state park since the late 1800s. The tunnel had graffiti dating to the 1800s, when visitors were encouraged to etch their names into the bark. "Joan Allday, wife of Jim Allday and also a volunteer at the park, said the tree had been weakening and leaning severely to one side for several years. " 'It was barely alive, there was one branch alive at the top,' she said. 'But it was very brittle and starting to lift.' " Tunnel trees were created in the 19th century to promote parks and inspire tourism. But cutting a tunnel through a living sequoia, of course, damages the tree. "Tunnel trees had their time and place in the early history of our national parks," the National Park Service has written. "But today sequoias which are standing healthy and whole are worth far more." The Pioneer Cabin sequoia in Northern California's Calaveras Big Trees State Park was carved into a tunnel in the late 19th century. It fell on Sunday, brought down by a massive storm. http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/09/508919216/iconic-sequoia-tunnel-tree-brought-down-by-california-storm
  3. Smoke inside the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses church at 1304 Empire Street in Cortez caused an evacuation Sunday morning. There were no injuries and the building did not catch fire. Services were canceled. The cause was determined to be a faulty motor in a heating system, according to Cortez Fire Department officials. The electricity was shut off and faulty part was contained. About 75 people were evacuated at about 10 a.m. said church elder Phil Conner. “The evacuation was very orderly, and the response from the fire department, ambulance and police was very quick, helpful and professional,” he said. The heater unit is being repaired. Source Via
  4. That’s a 40 percent increase since last year Citi Bike crushed its own records for the third consecutive year, with 2016 being the program’s most successful year yet. Over the course of 2016, riders took nearly 14 million trips—four million more than in 2015, or a 40 percent increase. According to a release from the mayor’s office, the largest bike-share program in North America now regularly serves more than 60,000 trips per day, putting it on par with Boro Taxis and the Staten Island Ferry. “In 2016, we fulfilled our pledge to grow Citi Bike, a sustainable transit option, to a range of more diverse Manhattan and Brooklyn communities,” Mayor de Blasio said in a statement. This year, the program added 139 new stations and 2,000 bikes to the fleet. And there’s more to come. Assuming all goes according to plan, Citi Bike should hit Astoria, Crown Heights, and Prospect Heights in 2017. (The future looks somewhat bleaker in Staten Island and the Bronx.) Also in 2017: Motivate, the private company that operates the program, the DOT, and the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene plan to launch more community partnerships designed to “increase and diversify participation in bike share.” Such a program already exists in Bed-Stuy—and membership is up in the neighborhood by more than 50 percent. http://ny.curbed.com/2016/12/29/14112944/citi-bike-2016-record-breaking-year
  5. The Obama administration is giving consumers a few extra days to sign up on HealthCare.gov in time for health insurance coverage to take effect Jan. 1. The new deadline is 11:59 p.m. Pacific time on Monday, Dec. 19, says Kevin Counihan, CEO of the federal health insurance markets. The unexpected extension was announced after close of business Thursday. Counihan said it's due to strong interest. The old deadline was Thursday. The Obama administration has set a goal of signing up 13.8 million people for 2017, a modest increase. So far enrollment is running about on par with last year, but the share of new customers is down. Open enrollment ends Jan. 31. President-elect Donald Trump and the GOP Congress have vowed to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/obamacare-deadline/obama-administration-extends-deadline-healthcare-gov-n696931
  6. RANGER, TEXAS — THE LEADERS OF THIS FORMER OIL BOOMTOWN NEVER GAVE 2-YEAR-OLD ADAM WALTON A CHANCE TO AVOID THE POISON. By Laura Ungar and Mark Nichols, A USA TODAY NETWORK INVESTIGATION RANGER, Texas — The leaders of this former oil boomtown never gave 2-year-old Adam Walton a chance to avoid the poison. It came in city water, delivered to his family’s tap through pipes nearly a century old. For almost a year, the little boy bathed in lead-tainted water and ate food cooked in it. As he grew into a toddler — when he should have been learning to talk — he drank tap water containing a toxin known to ravage a child’s developing brain. Adam's parents didn't know about the danger until this fall. Officials at City Hall knew long before then, according to local and state records. So did state and federal government regulators who are paid to make sure drinking water in Texas and across the nation is clean. Ranger and Texas officials were aware of a citywide lead problem for two years -- one the city still hasn't fixed and one the Waltons first learned about in a September letter to residents. The city and state even knew, from recent tests, that water in the Walton family’s cramped, one-bedroom rental house near the railroad tracks was carrying sky-high levels of lead. Destiny and John Walton got their first inkling of a problem when blood tests in June detected high levels of lead in their son’s growing body. They first learned that their tap water contained lead — about 28 times the federal limit — when a USA TODAY Network reporter told them in early November. Millions of Americans face similar risks because the nation’s drinking-water enforcement system doesn’t make small utilities play by the same safety rules as everyone else, a USA TODAY Network investigation has found. Tiny utilities - those serving only a few thousand people or less - don’t have to treat water to prevent lead contamination until after lead is found. Even when they skip safety tests or fail to treat water after they find lead, federal and state regulators often do not force them to comply with the law. USA TODAY Network journalists spent 2016 reviewing millions of records from the Environmental Protection Agency and all 50 states, visiting small communities across the country and interviewing more than 120 people stuck using untested or lead-tainted tap water. The investigation found: About 100,000 people get their drinking water from utilities that discovered high lead but failed to treat the water to remove it. Dozens of utilities took more than a year to formulate a treatment plan and even longer to begin treatment. Some 4 million Americans get water from small operators who skipped required tests or did not conduct the tests properly, violating a cornerstone of federal safe drinking water laws. The testing is required because, without it, utilities, regulators and people drinking the water can't know if it's safe. In more than 2,000 communities, lead tests were skipped more than once. Hundreds repeatedly failed to properly test for five or more years. About 850 small water utilities with a documented history of lead contamination — places where state and federal regulators are supposed to pay extra attention — have failed to properly test for lead at least once since 2010. This two-tiered system exists in both law and practice. State and federal water-safety officials told USA TODAY Network reporters that regulators are more lenient with small water systems because they lack resources, deeming some lost causes when they don’t have the money, expertise or motivation to fix problems. The nation’s Safe Drinking Water Act allows less-trained, often amateur, people to operate tiny water systems even though the risks for people drinking the water are the same. Officials in West Virginia, for example, labeled more than a dozen systems “orphans” because they didn’t have owners or operators. Enforcement efforts for those utilities amounted to little more than a continuous stream of warning letters as utilities failed to test year after year. All the while, residents continued drinking untested — and potentially contaminated — water. “At the end of the day, it creates two universes of people,” said water expert Yanna Lambrinidou, an affiliate faculty member at Virginia Tech. “One is the universe of people who are somewhat protected from lead. ... Then we have those people served by small water systems, who are treated by the regulations as second-class citizens.” All of this endangers millions of people across the country, mostly in remote and rural communities. Utilities like East Mooringsport Water, serving part of a bayou town of about 800 people, where drinking water went untested for more than five years. Or Coal Mountain, W.Va., a remote 118-person outpost where a retired coal miner pours bleach into untested water at the system's wellhead in hope of keeping it clean. Or Orange Center School outside Fresno, Calif., where for more than a decade regulators let about 320 grade-school kids drink water that had tested high for lead. Individually, the communities served by small utilities seem tiny. But together, the number of people getting lead-contaminated drinking water, or water not properly tested for lead, since 2010 is about 5 million. Virginia Tech’s Marc Edwards, one of the nation’s top experts on lead in drinking water who helped identify the crisis in Flint, Mich., laments that people in America’s forgotten places — rural outposts, post-industrial communities and poor towns — are most at risk from the dangers of lead exposure, such as irreversible brain damage, lowered IQ, behavioral problems and language delays. Edwards said the effects of lead poisoning could make it even more difficult for families in these communities to climb out of poverty. “I’m worried about their kids,” he said. “The risk of permanent harm here is horrifying. These are America’s children.” The Waltons fear lead has already harmed their son. At an age when other kids use dozens of words, Adam says just three: “mama,” “dada” and “no.” Destiny and John wish they would have known about the lead earlier so they could have protected him. “What’s going to happen if my son’s lead levels keep rising? What if the kid next door gets way sicker than my son? What’s Ranger going to do then?” Destiny asked. “They’ve known about it for years now. … Are they going to fix it?” Adam Walton, 2, in the striped shirt, has high levels of lead in his blood. He lives with his mom, Destiny; dad, John; and brother, Andrew, 1, in Ranger, Texas. The water supplying their house tested high for lead. (Photo: Laura Ungar, USA TODAY) http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/12/13/broken-system-means-millions-of-rural-americans-exposed-to-poisoned-or-untested-water/94071732/
  7. By @superorly07
  8. All youth of the congregation in Brea, California, gathered for an extensive Family Worship Night.
  9. This investment is expected to grow. The Jehovah’s Witnesses recently unloaded another building in their pricey portfolio of Dumbo properties and the buyer could erect a new residential tower on the site. Williamsburg developer Rabsky Group purchased the church’s four-story recreational facility next to the Manhattan Bridge at Adams and Front streets for $65 million on Nov. 29, as first reported by the Real Deal. The new owner can build a new property of up to 28 stories with residential, commercial, and community space inside under the land’s current zoning, according to a spokesman for the religious organization. Rabsky is no stranger to massive developments — the firm is erecting a futuristic 400-unit apartment complex on the site of the old Rheingold Brewery in Bushwick and is trying to convince the city to let it build more than 1,000 units across two full blocks of the former Pfizer factory in Bedford-Stuyvesant. The Witnesses — formally dubbed the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society — have been based in Brooklyn for more than a century, but are now selling off the extensive real estate holdings they amassed during that period as they prepare to relocate the nerve center upstate. They sold the bulk of their old printing plants and warehouses to developer Jared Kushner — President-elect Donald Trump’s son-in-law and right-hand-man — who has turned them into an interconnected office complex dubbed Dumbo Heights. Kushner also nabbed the church’s former Columbia Heights headquarters — complete with its iconic neon “Watchtower” sign — and is rumored to be purchasing its massive block-sized parking lot at Jay and Front streets where could build a thousand units of new housing. The birthday-spurning religious organization currently has four other properties on the market — including the site of the former Margaret Hotel at Columbia Heights and Orange Street, and the old Leverich Towers Hotel at Clark and Willow streets — and is still holding onto a handful of other digs it hasn’t put on the market. Rabsky Group did not return requests for comment. Reach reporter Lauren Gill at lgill@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her on Twitter @laurenk_gill Updated 4:50 am, December 7, 2016 http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/39/50/dtg-rabsky-buys-dumbo-jehovahs-witnesses-building-2016-12-09-bk.html
  10. Good Morning Everyone, I just wanted to get this out to you and let you know about the “In Demand” software skills, by industry and state that is a very useful guide when talking to job seekers who are seeking a career in software development and/or software engineering. Just click on each state and run your cursor over each industry at the bottom of the page to see the software programs that are in demand! Enjoy! http://www.mnu.edu/business/software-skills-demand
  11. Visiting a kingdom hall
  12. A day of rain did not stop this group of pioneers in Desloge, Missouri from going in service all day and find plenty of people at home! Great results today.
  13. KBZK.com | Continuous News | Bozeman, Montana The court case between the Belgrade Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses and the Montana Department of Transportation took another step forward today in the matter of widening Jackrabbit lane. ---------------------- Anyone on here live near this congregation?
  14. Trabajando juntos en un Salón del Reino en Dickson, Tennessee, Estados Unidos.
  15. A trial date has been set for a lawsuit between a former City of Key West Department of Transportation bus driver and the city, but a federal judge ordered both sides to attempt to resolve the case via mediation. Bobby Walker Jr. claims that he requested, via a letter dated Oct. 23, 2014, to the city manager’s office, that he not participate in the annual Fantasy Fest parade and that his “participation in the Fantasy Fest parade was contrary to his beliefs as a Jehovah’s Witness,” the lawsuit states. Walker claims his civil rights were violated, according to the lawsuit. U.S. District Judge Jose E. Martinez has tentatively scheduled a trial date for Jan. 23 at the federal courthouse in Key West on Simonton Street. He also set the mediation deadline for Dec. 14, meaning if the case has not been resolved outside of court by then a trial is likely to begin by the January date. Walker claims that during a meeting with superiors, city management officials “openly mocked (Walker’s) religious beliefs and threatened to write up Walker for purportedly not giving enough time to change the schedule,” the lawsuit states. According to the employee handbook, drivers are required to give at least two hours’ notice of any schedule change request. Walker claims that his two-day notice was more than ample. “A manager treated Mr. Walker differently than persons who were not of Jehovah’s Witness faith by threatening to write Mr. Walker up for not giving him a 48-hour notice of his request for time off, although persons of other religions are only held to a two-hour minimum notice,” Walker’s attorney, Jay Paul Lechner of St. Petersburg, wrote to The Citizen seeking comment. “The same manager made comments to the effect ‘I’ve had enough of this religion stuff,’ and ‘You’re the only one’ causing problems due to religion. Managers also spread rumors to other employees about Mr. Walker, such as that Jehovah’s Witnesses ‘think they are better than others.’” With respect to Walker’s race — he is black — Lechner wrote: “A mechanic manager angrily called Mr. Walker a ‘damn boy’ and purposely locked him out of the break room used by white employees. A manager made a comment to another manager to the effect of ‘get rid of that black son-of-a-(deleted),’ referring to Mr. Walker.” Immediately after Walker’s meeting with superiors, his “hours were decreased and he was subjected to threats of losing his job, vindictive acts and derogatory comments about his race from other members of the management team,” according to the lawsuit. Walker claims he complained to higher-ups but no action was taken, according to the lawsuit. On or about Dec. 31, 2014, Walker again requested a shift change so that he would not have to work the late shift on New Year’s Eve, based on his religious beliefs, the lawsuit states. He was fired shortly thereafter, according to the lawsuit. Walker is accusing the city of violating his civil rights under the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, as well as under the Florida Civil Rights Act. He is seeking back pay and benefits as well as his attorney’s fees and punitive damages. http://keysnews.com/node/79152
  16. Seems as if everyone is selling this pins nowadays. We used to be discouraged from identifying ourselves with Watchtower pins or logos in the past. How do you feel about our modern wearing of pins? What would be the arguments for / against such displaying of logos?
  17. JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. — Circuit Assembly of Jehovah’s Witnesses are holding a conference, “Increase Your Faith in Jehovah,” is the Biblical theme of the semi-annual event. Sponsored by the Circuit Assembly of Jehovah’s Witnesses from the greater Tri-Cities area and from areas nearby in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, the assembly will be held at Freedom Hall Civic Center, 1320 Pactolas Road, on Saturday, Nov. 19. It will begin at 9:40 a.m. and end at 4:15 p.m. with a break for lunch. “Someone might wonder who is referred to in our assembly theme, ‘Increase Your Faith in Jehovah!’.” said assembly representative Raymond Schneider. “The King James version of the Bible in Psalms 88:18 says, ‘JEHOVAH art is the most high over all the earth.’ The goal then is to ‘increase’ our faith in the God, of the Bible and Jehovah,” he said. “Our scripture, Hebrew 11:6, tells us we first must believe God exists or is real. Then it tells us to be fully convinced he will generously care for us and eventually reward us,” said Schneider. “That takes true faith. Those coming to the assembly will learn about that kind of faith and the rewards that will assuredly come to all of us.” The speakers will answer the following questions: Why is it necessary in all circumstances to have faith? How can we increase our faith? What gives us confidence that those with genuine faith will be rewarded? The main talk will be the public Bible discourse: “True Faith — What Is It, and How Is It Shown?” Attendance and parking is free and no offerings are taken. For more contact Schneider at 423-202-5398 or email rjssas@gmail.com. http://www.heraldcourier.com/religion/jehovah-s-witnesses-hold-conference-nov-in-johnson-city/article_80d59544-24d8-52e1-a57d-5cd67f88248c.html
  18. On the 53rd anniversary of the annual sea festival in Apalachicola, Florida, United States.