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A club to discuss the phenomenon called the Nike Corporation and Brand.

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    Vaporfly

    Following the trajectory of every great athlete—years of training, daily Wheaties, and approval from the world governing body for track and field—Nike’s Vaporfly sneakers will appear at the Tokyo Olympics this summer after all. The backstory: The $250 high-tech shoes were criticized starting in October after one marathoner broke the two-hour barrier and another shattered the women’s world record by 81 seconds (forever in competitive marathoning), both while wearing Vaporflys. Critics called the Vaporfly advantage “technological doping.” Yesterday, the World Athletics federation issued modifications designed to “protect the integrity of the sport” but punted on making an official ruling. Beginning April 30, shoes looking to get foot time in high-stakes competitions like the Olympics must be available for sale on the open retail market for at least four months. World Athletics is also regulating design specs like sole thickness. That means the current Vaporfly model isn’t banned at the elite level, at least for now. Why can't we all just switch to Velcro? Because Vaporfly isn’t your average sneaker (or tennis shoe). It uses a carbon plate designed to literally put a spring in your step. Over the last 13 months, runners wearing Vaporfly shoes have recorded the five fastest marathon times ever. The number of Adidas-sponsored runners winning major marathons has been chopped in half since the Vaporfly launched. Big picture: Nike and its rivals are locked in an arms race to roll out the highest-tech gear for elite athletes and earn screen time at mega-events like the Olympics. Looking ahead...any brand hoping to top Vaporfly’s promise of a 4% increase in efficiency before the Tokyo Olympics better hop to—the games begin July 24.
  3. But Just Do It doesn’t *always* apply to shakedowns. Lawyer-to-the-stars Avenatti was arrested yesterday in NYC on charges of attempting to extortup to $25 million from Nike (+0.17%). Yes, that Nike. Avenatti reportedly threatened to reveal that the company greenlighted payments to the families of top basketball recruits—unless Nike paid an unnamed client $1.5 million and agreed to hire Avenatti and another lawyer for $15 to $25 million (but a one-time payment of $22.5 million would also work). The timeline: Avenatti tweeted pre-cuffs that he’d hold a presser at 11am today profiling Nike’s "criminal conduct" that "involves some of the biggest names in college basketball." Via @MichaelAvenatti Avenatti allegedly told Nike lawyers last week that if his demands weren’t met, he’d "take $10 billion off your client’s market cap...I’m not [word that autocorrects to ducking] around." The trouble wasn’t confined to just one coast. In an unrelated case, federal prosecutors in Los Angeles charged Avenatti with wire fraud and bank fraud.
  4. Nike shares (-1.05%) were watched closely a day after Duke basketball phenom Zion Williamson injured himself when his foot ripped through one of its sneakers.
  5. The NFL and Colin Kaepernick have reached a settlement. The former 49ers QB is reportedly getting a payout in the “$60 million to $80 million range.”
  6. Last year they came out with a controversial Nike Hijab. I'm starting to think Nike is Islamic, black and anti-christian.... or at the very least is just looking for controversy to amplify it's marketing budget to stay relevant in a world of many choices.
  7. How Good Are Nike’s New VaporMax Sneakers? via ScitechPress.org
  8. Nike, a company whose brand is estimated to be worth $27 billion, understands the difference apparel can make to an athlete. And like any viable business, it knows the world is full of potential customers. And so in its latest market expansion, the brand has turned to the Middle East, where female athletes have begun to come into their own over the last few years. Nike’s new pull-on hijab is made of light, stretchy fabric that includes tiny holes for breathability and an elongated back so it will not come untucked. CreditAaron Hewitt/Nike This week, Nike announced that it would release a Pro Hijab for female Muslim athletes in spring 2018. The hijab, which is expected to cost $35, is made of a lightweight, stretchy mesh polyester and will come in gray, black and obsidian. Throughout several stages of development, the product was tested by a group that included Zahra Lari, the first figure skater from the United Arab Emirates to compete internationally; Manal Rostom, a runner and triathlete currently living in Dubai; and Amna Al Haddad, an Olympic weight lifter from the United Arab Emirates. The move followed Nike’s release of an Arabic version of its Nike & Training Club app early last year and the beginning of a campaign featuring five female athletes from the Arab region with the tagline “What will they say about you?” last month. Continue reading
  9. via TheWorldNewsOrgvia journal.theworldnewsmedia.org
  10. MLive.com 'Sneakerhead' Tom Izzo fired up about new Detroit Nike store MLive.com Michigan State University's head basketball coach Tom Izzo helps celebrate the Nike store grand opening inside the 22,000-square-foot space at 1261 Woodward Ave. in downtown Detroit, May 26, 2016. (Tanya Moutzalias | MLive Detroit). Print Email. Nike Puts Anchor In Revitalizing Downtown Detroit By Opening 'Community Store' on WoodwardForbes Skubick: Finishing touches put on slimmed-down Michigan budgetWLNS Athletic apparel maker Nike opening downtown Detroit storeValdosta Daily Times all 32 news articles » Google
  11. cleveland.com Nike gets wavy with latest version of the LeBron 13 cleveland.com Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James points to a fan after he dunked for a score in the second quarter against the Toronto Raptors center Bismack Biyombo in the second quarter against the Toronto Raptors during game two of the Eastern Conference ... and more » Google
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    • Isabella

      Good ideas 
       

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    • 4Jah2me  »  Srecko Sostar

      Hi Srecko. I hope you can see this photo. This is my daily driving car. It is outside a Dance Studio where  I have danced and hope to go dancing again, John 

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      Hello my sister, i have not head from you long sice. I hope you are wel. Hope to hear from you soon. Agape.
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    • Doryseeker  »  4Jah2me

      *** it-2 p. 7 Jehovah ***
      The Codex Leningrad B 19A, of the 11th century C.E., vowel points the Tetragrammaton to read Yehwahʹ, Yehwihʹ, and Yeho·wahʹ. Ginsburg’s edition of the Masoretic text vowel points the divine name to read Yeho·wahʹ. (Ge 3:14, ftn) Hebrew scholars generally favor “Yahweh” as the most likely pronunciation. They point out that the abbreviated form of the name is Yah (Jah in the Latinized form), as at Psalm 89:8 and in the expression Ha·lelu-Yahʹ (meaning “Praise Jah, you people!”). (Ps 104:35; 150:1, 6) Also, the forms Yehohʹ, Yoh, Yah, and Yaʹhu, found in the Hebrew spelling of the names Jehoshaphat, Joshaphat, Shephatiah, and others, can all be derived from Yahweh. Greek transliterations of the name by early Christian writers point in a somewhat similar direction with spellings such as I·a·beʹ and I·a·ou·eʹ, which, as pronounced in Greek, resemble Yahweh. Still, there is by no means unanimity among scholars on the subject, some favoring yet other pronunciations, such as “Yahuwa,” “Yahuah,” or “Yehuah.”
      Since certainty of pronunciation is not now attainable, there seems to be no reason for abandoning in English the well-known form “Jehovah” in favor of some other suggested pronunciation. If such a change were made, then, to be consistent, changes should be made in the spelling and pronunciation of a host of other names found in the Scriptures: Jeremiah would be changed to Yir·meyahʹ, Isaiah would become Yeshaʽ·yaʹhu, and Jesus would be either Yehoh·shuʹaʽ (as in Hebrew) or I·e·sousʹ (as in Greek). The purpose of words is to transmit thoughts; in English the name Jehovah identifies the true God, transmitting this thought more satisfactorily today than any of the suggested substitutes.
      *** it-2 p. 7 Jehovah ***
      The Codex Leningrad B 19A, of the 11th century C.E., vowel points the Tetragrammaton to read Yehwahʹ, Yehwihʹ, and Yeho·wahʹ. Ginsburg’s edition of the Masoretic text vowel points the divine name to read Yeho·wahʹ. (Ge 3:14, ftn) Hebrew scholars generally favor “Yahweh” as the most likely pronunciation. They point out that the abbreviated form of the name is Yah (Jah in the Latinized form), as at Psalm 89:8 and in the expression Ha·lelu-Yahʹ (meaning “Praise Jah, you people!”). (Ps 104:35; 150:1, 6) Also, the forms Yehohʹ, Yoh, Yah, and Yaʹhu, found in the Hebrew spelling of the names Jehoshaphat, Joshaphat, Shephatiah, and others, can all be derived from Yahweh. Greek transliterations of the name by early Christian writers point in a somewhat similar direction with spellings such as I·a·beʹ and I·a·ou·eʹ, which, as pronounced in Greek, resemble Yahweh. Still, there is by no means unanimity among scholars on the subject, some favoring yet other pronunciations, such as “Yahuwa,” “Yahuah,” or “Yehuah.”
      Since certainty of pronunciation is not now attainable, there seems to be no reason for abandoning in English the well-known form “Jehovah” in favor of some other suggested pronunciation. If such a change were made, then, to be consistent, changes should be made in the spelling and pronunciation of a host of other names found in the Scriptures: Jeremiah would be changed to Yir·meyahʹ, Isaiah would become Yeshaʽ·yaʹhu, and Jesus would be either Yehoh·shuʹaʽ (as in Hebrew) or I·e·sousʹ (as in Greek). The purpose of words is to transmit thoughts; in English the name Jehovah identifies the true God, transmitting this thought more satisfactorily today than any of the suggested substitutes.
       
      · 1 reply
    • Isabella  »  admin

      💤

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