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A cannabinoid is one of a class of diverse chemical compounds that acts on cannabinoid receptors in cells that alter neurotransmitter release in the brain. The field of cannabis research is vast and diverse. From biochemical studies of the plant itself to physiological and chemical studies of its pharmacology to psychological and social research into its effects, researchers studying cannabis produce the knowledge at the foundation of industry innovation and public policy. Yet perhaps the most important research being done in this new era of expanded access to legal cannabis pertains to just one facet of the plant: the humble cannabinoid. Cannabinoids, the chemicals that qualify the plant as a drug, are the sine qua non of the commercial and medical significance of cannabis.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. (CNN)Epidiolex, the first cannabis-based medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, is now available by prescription in all 50 states. The twice-daily oral solution is approved for use in patients 2 and older to treat two types of epileptic syndromes: Dravet syndrome, a rare genetic dysfunction of the brain that begins in the first year of life, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a form of epilepsy with multiple types of seizures that begins in early childhood, usually between ages 3 and 5. "Because these patients have historically not responded well to available seizure medications, there has been a dire need for new therapies that aim to reduce the frequency and impact of seizures," said Justin Gover, CEO of GW Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Epidiolex, in a written statement. "We are committed to ensuring that these patients can access this novel cannabinoid medicine that has been thoroughly studied in clinical trials, manufactured to assure quality and consistency, and is eligible to be covered by insurance for appropriate patients." https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/01/health/marijuana-drug-epidiolex-prescription/index.html
  3. Sunniva, Certhon technology 1507940147251-drlcss.mp4 The CannMed 2018 conference is in four weeks at UCLA (Oct. 22-24) and they are launching the event with a job fair in conjunction with The State of California. Talks include a cultivation panel led by Katya Boudko of Canopy Growth Corp. There are also 50 other presenters sharing on various aspects of the cannabis space. This is not a pay-to-play conference... it started at Harvard University and is now at UCLA.
  4. The Ebers Papyrus (c. 1550 BCE) from Ancient Egypt has a prescription for medical marijuana applied directly for inflammation.
  5. Guest

    Cannabis Americana J.L. Hopkins

    An advertisement for cannabis americana distributed by a pharmacist in New York in 1917
  6. Guest

    Drug bottle containing cannabis

    Cannabis indica fluid extract, American Druggists Syndicate, pre-1937
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    Da-ma

    The use of cannabis, at least as fiber, has been shown to go back at least 10,000 years in Taiwan. "Dà má" (Pinyin pronunciation) is the Chinese expression for cannabis, the first character meaning "big" and the second character meaning "hemp".
  8. He mentions the 500 Cannabis related stocks and says 50 are worth investing in of which he wants to hold 25. Wouldn't we all love to know which 25 those were! He mentioned this company a few times: GW Pharmaceuticals is a British biopharmaceutical company known for its multiple sclerosis treatment product nabiximols (brand name, Sativex) which was the first natural cannabis plant derivative to gain market approval in any country.[4] Another cannabis-based product, Epidiolex, for treatment of epilepsy, was approved for treatment of epilepsy in 2018.
  9. Bloomberg Opinion columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Todd Harrison, a founding partner and chief investment officer at the hedge fund CB1 Capital, which focuses on cannabinoid-based solutions and biopharmaceutical applications and therapies. Prior to his work with CB1 Capital, Harrison spent almost three decades on Wall Street managing risk and researching financial market strategies. He was also the founder and CEO of Minyanville Media Inc., an Emmy-winning financial media company covering global markets in real time. v3.mp3 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/audio/2018-06-28/todd-harrison-discusses-biopharmaceutical-investments
  10. The endogenous cannabinoids system, or endocannabinoid system (ECS), is the network of cell receptors throughout the body that interact with cannabinoids. Without the system, cannabinoids would do nothing for our bodies and cannabis would be irrelevant as a drug. Although, they are still quite useful as a crop. It would be a mistake, however, to think that the ECS only exists to react with the cannabinoids in marijuana. The human body, in fact, produces its own cannabinoids, called endocannabinoids. Interestingly, we know less about the cannabinoids our own bodies produce than we do about those the marijuana plant produces. And that’s because the discovery of cannabinoid receptors didn’t take place until 1988. It was this important discovery that initiated the search for our bodies own endocannabinoids. Until then, scientists believed a kind of generic interaction between cells and plant cannabinoids caused the psychological and physiological effects of marijuana. Now, we understand that there are highly specific chemical mechanisms responsible for those effects. Two decades later, though, we still know very little about the how our bodies actually make their own cannabinoids. But we do know what some of them are. Studying how our bodies’ endocannabinoids interact with the ECS and what effects these interactions is crucial for advancing our understanding of the therapeutic and recreational effects the phytocannabinoids in marijuana produce.
  11. Despite their importance, however, our scientific understanding of cannabinoids has been stunted, in the United States, by prohibition and elsewhere, by restrictive regulations. The result is a literature on the subject that’s patchy and inconsistent, yet reflective of the market’s interest in THC and CBD. Toppling regulations and expanding legalization, however, have made it possible for researchers to conduct more thorough investigations into other cannabinoids. Exploring the world of cannabinoids can be rewarding for anyone interested in cultivating a more intentional relationship with cannabis. Knowledge about precisely how and why certain strains and products produce their effects is empowering.
  12. It's like giving an extra ampoule of morphine to a soldier gut shot. Getting "HIGH" is not his most pressing problem.
  13. Thirty U.S. states have enacted medical cannabis laws, and all but one of them include cancer in the list of conditions allowed. Such laws give cancer patients across the country access to a substance that remains illegal under federal law. Anecdotal reports suggest marijuana is helpful in managing symptoms of chemotherapy, like pain and nausea. But it's unlikely curious patients are getting clear guidance from their doctors on whether they should try marijuana, which form might work best and how much to take. A new survey of 237 oncologists from around the country finds that while roughly 80 percent talk with their patients about marijuana, fewer than 30 percent feel they have sufficient knowledge to advise them about its medicinal use. Despite their shaky knowledge of the drug, nearly half of all oncologists do recommend medical cannabis to their patients, according to the study, which was published Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. But more than half of those suggesting it, don't consider themselves knowledgeable to do so, says Dr. Ilana Braun, a cancer psychiatrist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Mass. and the study's lead author. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/05/10/610039787/when-cancer-patients-ask-about-weed-many-doctors-say-go-for-it
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