Jump to content

About This Club

Topics and news related to the Catholic Church and Catholic life in general.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. Jesus once made a network, even though it was being overloaded. (John 21:6) . . .“Cast the net on the right side of the boat and YOU will find [some].” Then they cast it, but they were no longer able to draw it in because of the multitude . . .
  3. I was slow to adopt digital technology, though once I did I made full use of it. Back in the early days of smart phones, when I had yet to own a cell phone, I used to comment on WWJD (What Would Jesus Do). ”I’ll tell you what Jesus would do. Jesus would use a phone with a wire attached to the wall! He would never use a cell phone, and especially one with apps!” I didn’t even know what apps were, but I did know that Jesus would never use them.
  4. McCarrick was defrocked in February after he was found guilty of soliciting sex during confession and committing “sins” with minors and adults. “I’m not as bad as they paint me,” McCarrick told Slate’s Ruth Graham earlier this year in his only public comments on the issue. “I do not believe that I did the things that they accused me of.” He also said that he believe his accusers “were encouraged” to lie. The Vatican is set to release a report in the next few months that will look into how it handled the allegations against McCarrick over the years.
  5. Former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick appears to have been a fan of handing out money to other powerful leaders in the Catholic Church. Over the years, the disgraced cardinal, who was defrocked for sexual abuse, sent checks worth more than $600,000 to clerics, including two popes, according to the Washington Post. There were more than 100 beneficiaries to McCarrick’s largesse over the years, including several who were directly involved in evaluating misconduct allegations against McCarrick. Much of the money came from a special fund at the Archdiocese of Washington, where he was archbishop from 2001 to 2006, that allowed him to take money from wealthy donors and spend it pretty much at will without oversight from church officials. Pope John Paul II got $90,000 between 2001 and 2005 while Pope Benedict XVI received $291,000, including a $250,000 check a month after he became pope. Overall, McCarrick sent almost 200 checks to fellow clerics, including more than 60 to archbishops and cardinals. Those who received the checks insist there was nothing improper about the money and had no effect on their decisions about McCarrick. But the money raises fresh questions considering there has always been an air of mystery around how someone who faced frequent accusations of misconduct was able to rise so high in the church and stay there for years. It seems at least some of the donors were surprised to hear where their money was going, with one saying he thought the donations would go to the needy, not to other clerics. McCarrick was able to raise more than $6 million over 17 years, including at least $450,000 from Maryanne Trump Barry, President Donald Trump’s sister and a former federal appellate judge. McCarrick was defrocked in February after he was found guilty of soliciting sex during confession and committing “sins” with minors and adults. “I’m not as bad as they paint me,” McCarrick told Slate’s Ruth Graham earlier this year in his only public comments on the issue. “I do not believe that I did the things that they accused me of.” He also said that he believe his accusers “were encouraged” to lie. The Vatican is set to release a report in the next few months that will look into how it handled the allegations against McCarrick over the years.
      Hello guest!
  6. St Andrew the Apostle bone relic on the altar for Mass today at our local parish in Rome. Yep, *the* St Andrew. Incredible. Source
  7. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester, facing potentially huge judgments for past sexual abuse by its priests and other ministers, filed for bankruptcy protection Thursday morning.
      Hello guest!
    some quotes from article: At the same time, some critics say a bankruptcy proceeding may limit the release of damning information about abuse and cover-up, leaving some victims feeling the process did not provide the public acknowledgment of their torment that they had sought. "Settlements provided through bankruptcy court typically allow church officials to keep disclosures of abuse in house. Without having to report these allegations to the police or otherwise making them public, a full accounting of the number of abusers and who may have concealed or ignored those crimes can stay hidden," asserted a statement released by SNAP, a nationwide support group for victims of church sex abuse. Another plaintiff's lawyer, Jeff Anderson, whose firm has filed more CVA lawsuits than any other to date, denounced the diocese's move as "very disturbing and disappointing. "Bishop Salvatore Matano’s choice is simply a legal tactic to protect assets and prevent jury trials, and an attempt to prevent the truth from being revealed," Anderson said.
  8. The Catholic Church in Australia is participating in the redress scheme which simplifies claiming for victims, is a private process, limits liability for institutions and avoids the need for lawsuits. Watchtower is one of the few on the list that does not intend to join. They prefer the courts, which isn't sensible as it does not limit liability and is highly visible to the public.
      Hello guest!
  9. The Catholic Church here in Australia yesterday admitted in the Supreme Court that they knew about priest Ridsdale’s molesting hundreds of boys as far back as 1975. Thereby admitting liability. They just shifted him from parish to parish so he could continue molesting children. They have opened up the door to hundreds of lawsuits here in Oz and it will cost them millions of dollars in compensation and no doubt cause many faithful to abandon their religion...
  10.  


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.