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Share interesting topics related to the Jewish world both ancient and modern.

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  2. Over the past few years there has been a growing number of people who are re-creating the Hebrew alphabet and claiming that the Hebrew pronunciations used today is not Hebrew, but Assyrian and each Ancient Hebrew letter was a syllable; a, ba, ga, da, ha, etc. They call this “alphabet” the “Lashawan Qadash,” their pronunciation of the Hebrew phrase lashon qodesh meaning “holy tongue,” or “holy language. To illustrate their pronunciation of the Lashawa Qadash, letÂ’s look at Genesis 1:1. According to the Masoretic Hebrew text this verse is pronounced; BÂ’reshiyt bara elohiym et hashamayim vÂ’et haÂ’arets. But according to this group, the original pronunciation was; Barashayat bara alahayam at hashamayam wat harat. There are several problems with this “re-creation” of the alphabet. If you attempted to speak Hebrew to someone who knows Hebrew, you would be completely unintelligible and probably mocked for your pronunciation. Those who are making this claim have no evidence to back up it up. The evidence from ancient texts suggests that the pronunciation of the Masoretic text is correct, or at least more correct than this new theory of pronunciation. LetÂ’s take the name Israel as an example. In Hebrew, this word is pronounced YisÂ’raÂ’eyl, but they believe that this was originally pronounced yasharala. While there is no evidence to support this new style of pronunciation, there is evidence to refute it. Here is the name Israel from the Masoretic Hebrew Bible, which dates to about 1,000 AD. ?????????? The first letter is a yud with a “y” sound. This is the vowel pointing for the letter “I”. This is the letter sin, identified by the dot on the left of the letter, and pronounced with an “s,” as opposed to the letter shin, with a “sh” sound, when the dot is on the right. This is the vowel shÂ’va, which is silent. Here is the letter resh with an “r” sound. Here is the vowel qamats representing the “a” vowel. This is the letter aleph, which is silent. This is the vowel tsere representing the vowel pronunciation “ey.” And lastly the letter lamed with an “l” sound. However, these vowel pointings were created by the Masorites a thousand years ago and prior to this; this is how this word would appear. Those who teach the Lashawan Qadash are making the claim that this would be pronounced Yasharala. So how do we know if this was originally pronounced yisraÂ’eyl or yasharala? I canÂ’t tell you how it was pronounced 3,000 years ago, but I can tell you how it was pronounced 2,000 years ago. 2,000 years ago the Jews translated the Hebrew Bible into Greek. This Greek translation of the Bible is called the Septuagint. But when it came to names the translators transliterated the names into Greek, which help us to learn how Hebrew was pronounced 2,000 years ago. In the Greek Septuagint the name Israel was written like this and is pronounced IsraÂ’eyl. It is not Yasharala ?????? Nowhere, in any ancient document, do we find evidence supporting the Lashawan qadash, but we find ample proof supporting the pronunciations found in the 1,000 year old Masoretic Hebrew Bible. I am of the opinion that those who are using this style of Hebrew pronunciation are doing so in order to not have to learn or worry about the rules of pronunciation. They are making a short cut to prevent themselves from having to learn how to pronounce Hebrew words correctly.
  3. Who wants to be a "Sabbath Inspector" for Israel? I hear it is a time honored position Just ask any Pharisee or Sadduccee.
  4. "Jewish People Shine As A Light To All Nations" Pres Trump Hanukkah Celebration At The White House
  5. Several hundred ultra-Orthodox Jews demonstrated in Jerusalem on Sunday to protest against a court ruling that could require them to serve in the army like their secular counterparts. The demonstration in an ultra-Orthodox neighbourhood of the city was organised by a particularly hardline group known as Eda Haredit. Rabbis gave speeches in Yiddish in the Mea Shearim neighbourhood, while a banner read: "We're Jews and therefore will not enlist in the Zionist army."
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    The ultra-Orthodox oppose serving for a variety of reasons, with the most extreme believing a Jewish state is not allowed before the coming of the Messiah.
  6. Video: How the Haredim, Israel’s ultra-Orthodox, make their own rules  Â
  7. The history and evolution of the 20th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, the letter ר (resh).
  8. The history and evolution of the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet, the letter ש (shin)
  9. The history and evolution of the 22nd letter of the Hebrew alphabet, the letter ת (tav).
  10. The history and evolution of the 23rd letter of the Hebrew alphabet, the letter ע (ghayin).
  11. In addition to the Torah, many other historical artifacts belonging to the Hellenistic and Seljuq periods, including statues, stone rubbings, jewelry, and coins were recovered. A 16th Century Sephardi Torah scroll at the museum. (photo credit:JUDITH SUDILOVSKY) An ancient Torah estimated to be 1,500-years-old was seized from smugglers in Ayvalik, a western resort town in Turkey, the Anadolu news agency reported on Tuesday. In addition to the Torah, many other historical artifacts belonging to the Hellenistic and Seljuq dynasty periods, including statues, stone rubbings, jewelry, and 200 ancient bronze and silver coins were recovered. Turkish law enforcement detained two suspects and later released them on probation, and believe the smugglers brought the artifacts from Istanbul and Bingol, an eastern Turkish province. The Torah, inscribed on leather, was handed over with the other artifacts to the Balikesir Museum Directorship. So far, this has been a big week for the recovery of stolen Jewish antiquities. A 50-year-old Palestinian man was arrested on Tuesday after police seized hundreds of stolen rare antiquities from the Second Temple period stored in his West Bank home in the village of Huwara, near Nablus. According to police, jewelry, pottery and hundreds of coins valued at tens of thousands of shekels were found following a joint investigation with the Archaeology Department of the Civil Administration in Judea and Samaria into illegal trafficking on the black market. Daniel K. Eisenbud contributed to this report.
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  12. Sabbath in Ancient Hebrew Each letter in the Hebrew alphabet was originally a picture with meaning. In this video we will examine the letters in the Hebrew word שבת (shabbat) to uncover the meaning of this word based on its letters. Via
  13. There are several of these short videos of this type here. They are concise and useful for learning. But from the ones I've watched, there is a kind of agenda running through them that repeatedly tries to claim that the Greek alphabet was derived from the Hebrew. This particular video, above, states it explicitly. This appears to be wrong, though. The Hebrew alphabet was derived from the Phoenician. The Greek alphabet was also derived from the Phoenician. Otherwise how could the Greek alphabet be more closely tied to the Phoenician than the Hebrew? Several of the Phoenician letters made it into the Greek alphabet but never made it into the Hebrew.
  14. The Hebrew Origin of the Roman Alphabet Via
  15. Once a flourishing community, only a handful of Egyptian Jews, mostly elderly women, is all that remains in the Arab world's most populous country, aiming at least to preserve their heritage.
  16. Rachel Freier makes history by becoming the first Hasidic woman to hold US public office Rachel Freier became a civil court judge in New York City on Friday. She’s the first Hasidic Jewish woman to be sworn into public office in the United States. Freier, 51, won her seat for Brooklyn’s 5th Judicial District with a 74% landslide vote in November’s general election. Freier had garnered nearly 41% of the primary vote in defeating opponents Jill Epstein and Morton Avigdor. World News
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