Jump to content
The World News Media

First time since 11th century: Pope Francis to meet Russian Orthodox Patriarch


Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...

  • Views 540
  • Replies 1
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Similar Content

    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via
      A dispute broke out Thursday over whether the Ukrainian Orthodox Church should be independent from the Moscow Patriarchate after the Istanbul-based patriarch recognized several separatist churches and their leaders and gave them back control over parishioners.
      The Russian Orthodox Church described the proposed split as catastrophic for the Eastern Orthodoxy and millions of people in Ukraine and beyond. The Moscow-affiliated Ukrainian Orthodox Church said the synod’s decision was a hostile act and threatened the Constantinople patriarch with anathema.
       
    • By Bible Speaks
      VERY REVEALING PHOTOGRAPHY:
      THE PATRIARCH OF THE RUSSIAN ORTHODOX SECTA, Kirill and the Minister of Justice A. Konovalov.
      BOTH PROTAGONISTS OF THE INQUISITORIAL PERSECUTION AGAINST THE ONLY TRUE CHRISTIANS IN RUSSIA, THE WITNESSES OF JEHOVAH.

    • By Bible Speaks
      WHO'S THE EXTREMIST? RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH GIVES ITS BLESSINGS AND MUSIC ?- ???
      His legacy lies in his eponymous AK-47 assault rifle, one of the world's most popular and lethal weapons, and now Mikhail Kalashnikov's likeness looms over Moscow in the form of a 30-foot-tall monument, but not everyone is happy to see it.
      Kalashnikov's daughter, Yelena, unveiled the statue Tuesday at a square off Garden Ring Road, a busy thoroughfare in Russia's capital city, according to Reuters.
      The bronze Kalashnikov, the man, wields a bronze Kalashnikov, the weapon. The late Russian lieutenant general is casually attired, his jacket unzipped and the top button of his shirt undone.
      The words "I created a weapon for the defense of my fatherland" are etched on the pedestal.
      Tuesday's ceremony included military music and a blessing by a Russian Orthodox priest, The Guardian reports. Russian Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky said the gun had become a "cultural brand of Russia." But not all Russians were on board with the tribute.
      NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow that at least one protester was detained holding a sign that read "a weapons designer is a designer of death."

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By El Bibliotecario
      Si alguien sabe la ubicación e idioma de esta asamblea favor comentar :) 

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. World News
    • By The Librarian
      Around 2,000 people gathered at Saint Petersburg's Field of Mars to denounce plans to hand over the city's iconic St. Isaac's cathedral to the Orthodox Church. One of St. Petersburg's most popular attractions, it is feared that the handover will result in restricted access for tourists, lead to the neglect of exhibits on display, and deprive the city of extra revenue.
       
    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By The Librarian
      Russian Orthodox ice water baptisms
       
       
      And they call JW’s “extremists”???
      Via
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      October 19, 2016 (LifeSiteNews) — Pope Francis called religious proselytism “poison” during a meeting with Lutheran pilgrims in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall last week.
      The audience took place before the Pope’s trip to Lund, Sweden, for a commemoration of the Protestant Reformation 500 years ago. The meeting will also celebrate 50 years of official ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Lutherans.
      In the Holy Father’s speech to pilgrims he expressed gratitude for the initiative of the ecumenical pilgrimage that made its start in Germany and ended in Rome. He emphasized Baptism as the unifying basis for dialogue between the two Christian confessions and expressed hope for a continuous ecumenism.
      During the audience, the Pope received and put around his neck a yellow and blue scarf bearing the name of the German pilgrim group. The same scarf was laid around the statue of Martin Luther that was decorated and on display in the Vatican audience hall.
      A Q&A session followed.
      The first question came from a girl living in a region where 80 percent of the population is unbelieving. She asked (translated): “My friends do not go to Church, but they are my friends. Do I have to help them to go to Church or is it enough that they remain good friends?”
      Pope Francis answered that the “last thing” the girl has to do is to “speak.” He urged her to, “live like a Christian, like a Christian girl: chosen, forgiven, and on a path.”
      Then he argued ambiguously: “It is not licit that you convince them of your faith; proselytism is the strongest poison against the ecumenical path.”
      “You must give testimony of your Christian life; it will be your testimony that will stir the hearts of those who look at you,” he added.
      And he concluded: "It will be the Holy Spirit that moves the heart with your testimony – that is way you ask – and regarding that you can tell the 'why,' with much thoughtfulness. But without wanting to convince."
      The Pope seems to have chosen a clumsy way of encouraging the girl to pass on her faith.
      His remarks here echo his previous strong words to condemn those who are doing Christ’s work, namely, spreading the Good News. If the pope thinks proselytism, in its widest interpretation (“the act of becoming a proselyte” – a person who converts from one opinion to another), is poison, then how does he think Christians can spread the Gospel?
      With his condemnation, Pope Francis poorly answered the question of a 15-year-old girl in the manner he emphasized that it is not she who will ultimately convert the hearts of men but rather the Holy Spirit, and that she can only pave the way for God to act.
      Within the framework of the commemoration of 500 years of the Reformation – an event that hardly deserves “celebration” – the Pope does not seem to be able to think of a world without the Protestant denominations; a world in which the Christians would all be Catholic, as it would largely be had it not been for Luther. In such a world, ecumenism would become unnecessary, since all Christians would be “one” in the Church.
      Most puzzling is that Pope Francis called the heartfelt wish of a girl who wants to tell her friends about Christ in order to make them happy “poisonous.”
      Likewise, a message like this hardly articulates what John Paul II wrote in his encyclical, Ut unum sint: “Together with all Christ’s disciples, the Catholic Church bases upon God’s plan her ecumenical commitment to gather all Christians into unity” (Nr. 5), a unity that is the Church, because she is the “sacrament of unity.” “Rather, she is permanently open to missionary and ecumenical endeavor, for she is sent to the world to announce and witness, to make present and spread the mystery of communion which is essential to her, and to gather all people and all things into Christ.”
      The meeting ended with an off the cuff joke after the pilgrims asked the Pope, “Who is better? The Evangelicals or the Catholics?” Emphatic laughter followed, yet the response failed to appear.
      Transcript of pope's remarks
      15 year old girl: My friends do not go to Church, still they are my friends. Do I have to reconcile them with going to church or is it enough to remain good friends?
      Pope Francis: The first question, the one that was posed in the context of the region having 80% of the population without a creed, is: “Do I have to convince these friends – good ones, who work and who are happy – do I have to convince them of my faith? What must I say to convince them?” Listen, the last thing you must do is to “speak.” You have to live as a Christian, like a Christian: convinced, forgiven, and on a path. It is not licit to convince them of your faith; proselytism is the strongest poison against the ecumenical path. You must give testimony to your Christian life; testimony will unsettle the hearts of those who see you. And from this unsettling grows one question: but why does this man or this woman live like that? And that prepares the ground for the Holy Spirit. Because it is the Holy Spirit that works in the heart. He does what needs to be done: but He needs to speak, not you. Grace is a gift, and the Holy Spirit is the gift of God from whence comes grace and the gift that Jesus has sent us by His passion and resurrection. It will be the Holy Spirit that moves the heart with your testimony – that is way you ask – and regarding that you can tell the “why,” with much thoughtfulness. But without wanting to convince.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Pope Francis says gays — and all the other people the church has marginalized, such as the poor and the exploited — deserve an apology.
      Francis was asked Sunday en route home from Armenia if he agreed with one of his top advisers, German Cardinal Reinhard Marx, who told a conference in Dublin in the days after the deadly Orlando gay club attack that the church owes an apology to gays for having marginalized them.
      Francis responded with a variation of his famous "Who am I to judge?" comment and a repetition of church teaching that gays must not be discriminated against but treated with respect.
      He said some politicized behaviors of the homosexual community can be condemned for being "a bit offensive for others." But he said: "Someone who has this condition, who has good will and is searching for God, who are we to judge?"
      "We must accompany them," Francis said.
      "I think the church must not only apologize ... to a gay person it offended, but we must apologize to the poor, to women who have been exploited, to children forced into labor, apologize for having blessed so many weapons" and for having failed to accompany families who faced divorces or experienced other problems.
      Francis uttered his "Who am I to judge?" comment during his first airborne press conference in 2013, signaling a new era of acceptance and welcome for gays in the church. Francis followed up by meeting with gay and transgender faithful, and most significantly, by responding to claims that he met with anti-gay marriage campaigner Kim Davis during his U.S. visit. He said the only personal meeting he held in Washington was with his gay former student and his partner.
      Despite such overtures, however, many gay Catholics are still waiting for progress after a two-year consultation of the church on family issues failed to chart concrete, new pastoral avenues for them.
      The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, told reporters after Francis' press conference that the pope wasn't referring to a medical "condition" when he spoke of gays, but rather a lifestyle situation.
      ———
      This story has been corrected to show that the cardinal's name is Reinhard Marx, not Karl.
      Source: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By The Librarian
      April 7, 2016  •  From theTrumpet.com

      The Russian Orthodox Church has replaced the Communist Party as the ideological glue holding Vladimir Putin’s empire together.
      By Andrew Miiller
      During the Soviet era, thousands of churches were destroyed and millions of Christians were persecuted. Communist textbooks called religion “the opium of the people” and Christianity “a perverse reflection on the world.” In the 24 years since the fall of the Soviet Union, however, Orthodox Christianity has made an astonishing recovery. While only a third of Russians identified as Orthodox in 1991, over two thirds now identify as Russian Orthodox Christians.
      Yet the rise of the Orthodox Church hasn’t brought religious liberty to Russia. It has simply replaced the Communist Party as the ideological state apparatus used to forcibly unite Russians!
      In a court case under way in southern Russia, Viktor Krasnov is facing up to a year in prison for writing “There is no God” on VKontakte (a Russian social media network similar to Facebook). The authorities became aware of this comment when an online user contacted them, claiming that Krasnov was offending Orthodox believers. Police raided Krasnov’s apartment and forced him to undergo a monthlong examination at a psychiatric ward. Once he was deemed fit for trial, he was charged under a Russian law that makes it illegal to insult the feelings of religious believers.
      It isn’t just atheists who are no longer granted religious freedom in Russia. Alexey Koptev was arrested in 2011 after undercover police officers established that he belonged to the Jehovah’s Witnesses Christian denomination. In 2009, the city of Taganrog banned the Jehovah’s Witnesses denomination for propagating the exclusivity and supremacy of its religion. This denomination now shares the same legal status as the Islamic State and the National Socialist Society.
      In 2002, Russia enacted an extremism law with a provision defining religious extremism as “incitement of religious discord” in connection with acts or threats of violence. Five years later, the law was amended to allow prosecution for inciting religious discord even in the absence of any threat or act of violence. Mormons, Scientologists and even Pentecostals are now coming under increasing government pressure.
      In return for public support from Russian Orthodox clergy, President Vladimir Putin attends church services and portrays himself as a defender of “Christian values.” Like the Byzantine emperors and Russian czars before him, he is using a de facto state religion to unify his empire!
      “The Orthodox revival gave Russians an identity after the years of uncertainty that followed the fall of the Soviet Union,” private intelligence company Stratfor wrote last month. “The Kremlin has used this to its advantage, so effectively portraying support for Putin’s government as a religious duty that the church is now seen as part of the state apparatus.”
      Post-Soviet efforts to remake Moscow into a representative government are failing. Russia has embraced an authoritarian leader driven to vaunt his nation back to the great power status he feels it deserves. This development has dangerous implications for the world. Russia is swiftly becoming a nuclear-armed czarist empire! ▪
       
      See also the Russian Orthodox category
       




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.