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Jehovah’s Witnesses hosting regional convention

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3670940_web1_Kapiolani.jpg

Courtesy photo A painting depicting Chiefess Kapi‘olani at Kilauea praising Jehovah’s name in December 1824.

 

 

Published in 1920, the “Hawaiian Annual,” a sort of “Farmer’s Almanac” for Hawaii, made this comment: “More than one historian has related that Chiefess Kapi‘olani was a loyal adherent to her religious faith.”

And in the 1883 book, “Fire Fountains,” author C.F. Gordon-Cummings calls Chiefess Kapi‘olani, “the Hawaiian Elijah.” Gordon-Cummings’ biblical reference (1Kings 18:19-40) is that of Elijah in his loyalty to his God Jehovah.

Loyalty, it has been said, is a lost virtue.

In a door-to-door campaign, Jehovah’s Witnesses will be inviting the public to attend their free 2016 “Remain Loyal to Jehovah!” regional convention July 8-10 at the Edith Kanaka‘ole Multi-Purpose Stadium.

Showing loyalty to kupuna, the doors will open each morning at 8 a.m. for those 65 and older and their caregiver. General admission will follow at 8:15 a.m. The afternoon session each day will conclude before 5 p.m..

The three-day event will feature 49 presentations, each exploring the theme “loyalty.” Additionally, the Witnesses have prepared 35 video segments specifically for the program plus two short films that will be shown July 9 and 10 depicting various facets of loyalty.

Each of the three-day morning and afternoon sessions will be introduced by music videos recorded for the convention.

“We strongly believe that loyalty is an essential part of any healthy relationship,” said David A. Semonian, a spokesman for Jehovah’s Witnesses at their world headquarters in Brooklyn, N.Y. “Our convention this year features content that will help people develop stronger bonds with friends, family members and, above all, with God. We are confident that all who attend will enjoy this program.”

Online: www.jw.org

Source: http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/community/jehovah-s-witnesses-hosting-regional-convention

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      “When we do preach to them and they read the Bible and realize ‘Hey my grandfather is just sleeping’ that means they have to leave these traditions that obviously contradict what the scriptures say, to serve Jehovah.”
      Fleming said that when he arrived in 1996 there were about 20,000 Jehovah’s Witnesses in the country and that now there are about 40,000.
      He said many people in Cameroon see the positives of the faith, the health benefits it tends to lead to like stopping smoking or reducing AIDS, and actually approach his group to set up Jehovah’s Witnesses centres, or ‘kingdom halls’, in their community.
      “Many people in Cameroon make the change. I wouldn’t have stayed there for 20 years if we weren’t having wonderful success,” he said.
      https://www.sootoday.com/local-news/after-20-years-away-a-religious-missionary-returns-home-from-west-africa-6-photos-338082
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      As part of a series of three-day conventions across the country, Jehovah's Witnesses are offering community programming this weekend in Rochester.
      With a theme of "Remain Loyal to Jehovah," the convention features more than 40 different presentations, and runs from 9:20 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from 9:20 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. on Sunday. All of the events will be held at the Blue Cross Arena at the Community War Memorial, 100 Exchange Blvd., and will feature music, videos and films exploring loyalty.
      The event is free and open to the public. More information can be found at www.jw.org.
      http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2016/07/15/jehovahs-witnesses-convention-goes-through-weekend/87120142/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      A convention of Jehovah’s Witnesses is going on this weekend at Blue Cross Arena. In case you come downtown and wonder why you see so many people and the parking garages are full.
      http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/nletter/roc60/2016/07/15/roc60-s-some-serious-money/87144384/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      The regional Jehovah’s Witnesses convention for Sparks will continue through Aug. 14 in Sacramento. Specifics can be found at jw.org.
      As in years past, the Witnesses will distribute a special invitation to the public welcoming them to attend the program. This campaign began in Sparks on July 8 and will extend to Aug. 4.
      Congregations in Sparks will be attending the convention to be held July 29-31 and also August 4-6. The program begins at 9:20 am each morning.
      http://sparkstrib.com/2016/07/15/jehovah-witness-convention-continues/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Today through Sunday, July 15-17, at New Mexico State University Pan American Center for the Spanish speaking delegates. The music presentation begins at 9:20 a.m. each morning and program concludes by 5 p.m. each evening. Jehovah’s Witnesses are inviting the public to attend the 2016 “Remain Loyal to Jehovah!” regional conventions. The three-day program will feature 49 presentations, each exploring the theme “loyalty.” Additionally, the Witnesses have prepared 35 video segments specifically for the program plus two short films that will be shown on Saturday and Sunday. Each day, the morning and afternoon sessions will be introduced by music videos recorded for the convention. Everyone is welcome. Info: Juan Cavazos, 915-855-8404, jw.org.
      http://www.lcsun-news.com/story/life/sunlife/2016/07/15/religion-briefs-july-15/86954924/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Jehovah’s Witnesses from Haywards Heath and Burgess Hill, together with those from the rest of Sussex, parts of South London and Surrey, and the Kent and Hampshire borders will be gathering at the Amex Stadium together with members of the public for a convention between Friday July 15 and Sunday July 17. Everyone is welcome throughout the three day convention - there is no charge and no collections are ever taken.
      The theme of the convention is ‘Remain Loyal To Jehovah’ and an attendance of around 10,000 is expected. Visit www.jw.org/en/jehovahs-witnesses/conventions/


      http://www.midsussextimes.co.uk/news/your-news/convention-for-jehovah-s-witnesses-1-7478239
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      A man takes notes during a session of a Jehovah’s Witness convention at the Toyota Center in Kennewick. File Tri-City Herald

       
      Two regional Jehovah’s Witness conventions are planned at the Toyota Center in Kennewick this month, each expected to draw more than 5,000 people.
      The first is July 15-17. That program will be in English.
      The second is in Spanish and runs July 22-24.
      Jehovah’s Witnesses from the Tri-Cities and throughout the Mid-Columbia will attend. Church members also have been out in the community, extending personal invitations to check out the sessions.
      This year’s theme is “Remain Loyal to Jehovah.”
      The program will include 49 presentations exploring the theme of loyalty, with nearly three-dozen videos set to be shown, along with two short films and music videos, a news release said.
      “We’re hoping that with the program designed as it is, folks with leave with a better appreciation of how important loyalty is in our lives,” said Robert Tomchuk, an elder in the north Richland congregation.
      Sessions start at 9:20 a.m. each day.
      Admission is free, and no collection is taken. All are welcome.
      http://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/religion/article89698932.html
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