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joel alarios sr.

JW Public Cemetery Witnessing

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joel alarios sr. -
Jack Ryan -
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Extraordinary!!

I presume this is in the Phillipines.

I'm not sure if you can use the word "overkill" for cemetery witnessing, but it does seem a high concentration of mobile witnessing carts in that one location!

Is this a regular feature or is it particularly in connection with the Philipino version of Hallowe'en?

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Thank  you  for  the  many,  wonderful  pictures  from  serving  Jehovah,  joel alarios sr.  ;-)  from  early  morning  until  evening,  very  long !  I  hope,  you  had  a  successful  day ❤

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Eoin Joyce, thank you for your nice comment...  thousands of devotee visits this cemetery every year starting Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. On October 14, 2016, we apply for a permit to display our publications in four (4) different  locations sorrounding the cemetery. But, since the community leader is familiar to our activity, he selected the lone entrance of the cemetery for us to put the display, Because the 3 other locations are intended for commercial used. Each Pioneers and publishers contributed for the rental of the place. Boxes of publications were placed, and some people accepted to visit them. Successful indeed!

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5 hours ago, joel alarios sr. said:

Each Pioneers and publishers contributed for the rental of the place.

Excellent initiative.

From:  http://hubpages.com/holidays/How-do-Filipinos-Celebrate-the-Halloween

Halloween here in the Philippines is not like the Halloween in the Western countries. Although it’s a big holiday (comparable to Christmas here), we celebrate it in a different manner. Halloween in the Philippines lasts from the eve of October 31 (or even before this day) to November 2. Due to our strong Catholic background, Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 are spent remembering our dead loved ones and these dates will usually find most of us in one place only: the cemetery or the memorial park.

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"Cemetery witnessing" has not been recommended in the United States for many years, although our desire to "comfort those who mourn" might produce an informal situation even if it were not organized from the congregation's perspective.

When I was much younger I knew people (including my mother and grandmother) who tried this on Decoration Day (now Memorial Day) back when it was recommended by the Society to do "cemetery witnessing." (probably 1957 to 1963) It was never recommended that it should become a high-profile activity, however.

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On 11/3/2016 at 7:29 PM, JW Insider said:

"Cemetery witnessing" has not been recommended in the United States for many years,

It is not recommended where I live either as an organised activity. Where I live many know each other and funerals are a big well attended affair. ain fact locally raised brothers will not call on someone who has been recently bereaved as it is seen to be highly distasteful and insensitive.

Meeting someone informally is different however, and striking up a one to one when visiting a cemetery would not be objectionable. I recently conducted a funeral for a brother whose very large family are mostly not witnesses. About 75 in attendance had no Bibles so the scriptural part of the talk I put on the screens in the kingdom hall. They were very appreciative, I could see everyone focussed on the scriptures and got excellent feedback after. One said they are not used to going home from a funeral feeling happier. They usually feel worse than when thay went in.

So there we are. The scriptures do their work. It is up to us to ensure the apples of gold are set attractively. Pro. 25:11.

 

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