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Nicole

What's your idea of the perfect date?

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Queen Esther    6,175
1 hour ago, Sonita said:

Spend a  day at a beach :) 

With  friends  or  alone ?  With  friends  or  a  partner,  thats  nice  and  funny... :)

I  did  it  often  on  an  Island,  wow !  With  beachball,  table - tennis  or  more...  A  great  idea,  yes

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Queen Esther    6,175

@Sonita  Yes, maybe  you're  right  with  enjoying....  xD  but  every  human  is  a  little  different.  -  And,  alone  at  a  beach,  I  think  can  be  little  dangerous  in  our  bad  time,  sorry :(  But  in  the  NW,  we  all  make  fun  at  any  beach...  hahaha  :D

@Nicole  Yes  Nicole,  I've  lots  of  wonderful  memories  from  5 Maldives holidays :)  I  hope,  these  beautiful  paradise  islands  never  going  under  water ;-(  Jehovah  will  rescue  them,  I  think  so !    ( Thanks  for  your  nice  comment...)

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    • By Nicole
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    • By Nicole
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    • By Nicole
      Lindsay Dodgson/Business Insider
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      If you find someone is constantly belittling you or focusing on your flaws , don't bite. The worst thing you can do is be defensive. Patel says this will only give them more power. Instead, turn the spotlight on them and start asking them probing questions, such as what in particular their problem is with what you're doing.
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      If you want to be sneaky to get someone to agree with you, there are psychological tricks you can use. Research suggests you should speak faster when disagreeing with someone so they have less time to process what you're saying. If you think they might be agreeing with you, then slow down so they have time to take in your message .
      8. Ultimately, remember you are in control of your own happiness.
      If someone is really getting on your nerves, it can be difficult to see the bigger picture. However, you should never let someone else limit your happiness or success.
      If you're finding their comments are really getting to you, ask yourself why that is. Are you self-conscious about something, or are you anxious about something at work? If so, focus on this instead of listening to other people's complaints.
      You alone have control over your feelings, so stop comparing yourself to anyone else. Instead, remind yourself of all your achievements, and don't let someone gain power over you just because they momentarily darken your day.
      This story originally appeared on Business Insider.

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    • By Nicole

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