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A bible was found untouched amid tornado wreckage in Mississippi, opened to a page that read...

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On 1/25/2017 at 1:16 PM, TheWorldNewsOrg said:

A bible was found untouched amid tornado wreckage in Mississippi, opened to a page that read “God is our refuge” https://t.co/rTaVFV1eoa http://pic.twitter.com/ezIYaOwTjI

— CNN (@CNN) January 25, 2017

My thoughts on this was that a reporter surveying the damage, looking for a story, took his water stained (from when he left his car window open...)  Bible out of the car, set it on a floor,, opened it to a passage that would appeal to man's better but gullible nature,  and took the picture back to his Editor for a GREAT, but totally fake human interest story.

When I was a newspaper photo lab technician as a teenager, I saw things like that several times.

Or, as John Randolph Hurst, about which the movie "Citizen Kane" was about, said when MANUFACTURING news about Spanish Atrocities against the Cubans just before the Spanish-American War, because no news does NOT SELL NEWSPAPERS, to his reporters in Havana "You supply the pictures, I will supply the war!"

His totally fake news generated enough public outrage to cause Congress to declare War against Spain.

 

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