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The Librarian -
James Thomas Rook Jr. -
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On 5/8/2017 at 3:04 PM, The Librarian said:

This was addressed to @JW Insider ..... probably from a separate thread elsewhere.

I'd LOVE to answer these questions!!!

But I have no idea where this question came from. I had to give far less attention here for a few days and found that I had more notifications than I could review. I'll try to find the original thread where this came from when I get a chance.

But, yes, I have read the book of Enoch, and I'm pretty sure I know exactly why Leviathan is female and Behemoth is male. Also, I have a pretty good idea about why Enoch mentions the 14th day of the seventh month, but nothing as definitive on that count. 

If you or anyone else knows where this question first came up, please let me know. This way I'll put the answer in the right place.

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Although not exactly sure how to read the .djvu file types....

The Book of Enoch

Эфиопская версия с фрагментами греческой и латинской версий, а также перевод на английский язык.

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The Ethiopic Book of Enoch

A New Edition in the Light of the Aramaic Dead Sea Fragments by Michael A. Knibb in consultation with Edward Ullendorff. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

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Siegbert Uhlig. Das äthiopische Henochbuck

Jüdische Schriften aus hellenistisch-römischer Zeit 5.6. Gütersloher.

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The Books of Enoch: Aramaic Fragments of Qumrân Cave 4

Edited by J. T. Milik with the collaboration of Matthew Black. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

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The Book of Enoch, or I Enoch

A New English Edition with Commentary and Textual Notes by Matthew Black. // Studia in Veteris Testamenti Pseudepigrapha 7. Leiden: Brill.

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The Last Chapters of Enoch in Greek

Edited by Campbell Bonner.

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The ‘Astronomical’ Chapters of the Ethiopic Book of Enoch (72 to 82)

Translation and Commentary by Otto Neugebauer. With Additional Notes on the Aramaic Fragments by Matthew Black.

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3 Enoch, or The Hebrew Book of Enoch

Edited and translated by Hugo Odeberg.

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Apocalypsis Henochi Graece; Fragmenta pseudepigraphorum Graeca

M. Blank et A. M. Denis. // Pseudepigrapha Veteris Testamenti Graece 3. Ed. A. V. Denis et M. de Jonge. Leiden: Brill, 1970.

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To biblion Enwc

Книга Еноха на греческом языке.

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Enochi liber

Книга Еноха на латинском языке.

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Henoch. The origins of Enochic Judaism

Ed. Gabriele Boccaccini. Toronto: Silvo Zamorani.

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The Book of Enoch the Prophet. By Richard Laurence

An Apocryphal Production, supposed for ages to have been lost; but discovered at the close of the last century in Abyssinia; now first translated from an Ethiopic MS. in the Bodleian Library. 3rd edition. Oxford: Parker, 1838.

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The Book of Enoch. By George H. Schodde

Translated from the Ethiopic, with Introduction and Notes. Andover: Draper, 1911.

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А. Смирнов. Книга Еноха

Историко-критическое исследование. Казань, 1888.

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Книга Еноха

Перевод А. Смирнова. // Православный Собеседник. Казань, 1888.

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Книга Еноха

Ветхозаветный апокалипсис II – I вв. до н.э.

 

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Edward Murray. Enoch Restitutus

An Attempt to separate from the Books of Enoch the Book quoted by St. Jude, also A Comparison of the Chronology of Enoch with the Hebrew Computation, and with the periods mentioned in the Book of Daniel and in the Apocalypse. London: Rivington, 1836.

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И. Р. Тантлевский. Книги Еноха

   

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Славянская Книга Еноха Праведного

Редакция и перевод на латинский М. И. Соколова. Москва: Синодальная Типография, 1910.

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Le Livre des Secrets d’Hénoch

Texte slave et traduction française par A. Vaillant. Paris: Institut d’Études slaves. (Славянская версия Книги тайн Еноха.)

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The Book of the Secrets of Enoch

Translated from the Slavonic by W. R. Morfill. Edited by R. H. Charles. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1896.

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“God Took Him” Is there a Book of Enoch? No, why?

??????

Enoch was apparently in mortal danger when “God took him.” (Genesis 5:24) Jehovah did not allow his faithful prophet to suffer at the hands of rabid enemies. According to the apostle Paul, “Enoch was transferred so as not to see death.” (Hebrews 11:5) Many say that Enoch did not die—that God took him to heaven, where he kept on living. However, Jesus plainly stated: “No man has ascended into heaven but he that descended from heaven, the Son of man.” Jesus was the “forerunner” of all who ascend to heaven.—John 3:13; Hebrews 6:19, 20.

??????

So, what happened to Enoch? His being “transferred so as not to see death” may mean that God put him in a prophetic trance and then terminated his life while he was in that state. Under such circumstances, Enoch would not experience the pangs of death. Then “he was nowhere to be found,” apparently because Jehovah disposed of his body, even as he disposed of Moses’ body.—Deuteronomy 34:5, 6.

??????

Enoch lived 365 years—not nearly as long as most of his contemporaries. But the important thing for lovers of Jehovah is that they serve him faithfully to the end of their days. We know that Enoch did that because “before his transference he had the witness that he had pleased God well.” The Scriptures do not disclose how Jehovah communicated this to Enoch. Nevertheless, before Enoch died, he was given assurance of God’s approval, and we can be certain that Jehovah will remember him in the resurrection.

??????

Does the Bible Quote From the Book of Enoch?
  ??????

The Book of Enoch is an apocryphal and pseudepigraphic text. It is falsely ascribed to Enoch. Produced probably sometime during the second and first centuries B.C.E., it is a collection of extravagant and unhistorical Jewish myths, evidently the product of exegetical elaborations on the brief Genesis reference to Enoch. This alone is sufficient for lovers of GodÂ’s inspired Word to dismiss it.

??????

In the Bible, only the book of Jude contains Enoch’s prophetic words: “Look! Jehovah came with his holy myriads, to execute judgment against all, and to convict all the ungodly concerning all their ungodly deeds that they did in an ungodly way, and concerning all the shocking things that ungodly sinners spoke against him.” (Jude 14, 15) Many scholars contend that Enoch’s prophecy against his ungodly contemporaries is quoted directly from the Book of Enoch. Is it possible that Jude used an unreliable apocryphal book as his source?

  ??????

How Jude knew of Enoch’s prophecy is not revealed in the Scriptures. He may simply have quoted a common source, a reliable tradition handed down from remote antiquity. Paul evidently did something similar when he named Jannes and Jambres as the otherwise anonymous magicians of Pharaoh’s court who opposed Moses. If the writer of the Book of Enoch had access to an ancient source of this kind, why should we deny it to Jude?*—Exodus 7:11, 22; 2 Timothy 3:8

 ??????

How Jude received the information about EnochÂ’s message to the ungodly is a minor matter. Its reliability is attested to by the fact that Jude wrote under divine inspiration. (2 Timothy 3:16) GodÂ’s holy spirit guarded him from stating anything that was not true.

https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200271940

ADDA451A-CB37-463A-952C-0D72A0EB1F44.jpeg

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Using simple reason and common sense it seems to me that what happened to Enoch was quite simple.

Years ago I went to work for Dallas Area Rapid Transit, (DART) in Dallas, Texas, and my former job and stuff was in Greenville South Carolina. 

A moving company came and TRANSFERRED all my stuff to Dallas, Texas. 

I, nor my stuff went to heaven, and I did not die, and if you looked for me in Greenville, I was nowhere to be found.

Using that as a typical example, I believe that satisfies ALL the scriptural "requirements", and does not require any mental gymnastics or Twilight Zone suppositions.

Jehovah God relocated Enoch by transferring him to another unspecified location.

He might even have been a great ancestor of Mick Dundee, of Walkabout Creek, Australia.

AND... it uses the word "transferred" exactly correctly.

This is what I personally believe, by the way, for the reasons stated.

Occam's Razor   500   .jpg

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    • By Bible Speaks
      “God Took Him” Is there a Book of Enoch? No, why?
      Enoch was apparently in mortal danger when “God took him.” (Genesis 5:24) Jehovah did not allow his faithful prophet to suffer at the hands of rabid enemies. According to the apostle Paul, “Enoch was transferred so as not to see death.” (Hebrews 11:5) Many say that Enoch did not die—that God took him to heaven, where he kept on living. However, Jesus plainly stated: “No man has ascended into heaven but he that descended from heaven, the Son of man.” Jesus was the “forerunner” of all who ascend to heaven.—John 3:13; Hebrews 6:19, 20
      So, what happened to Enoch? His being “transferred so as not to see death” may mean that God put him in a prophetic trance and then terminated his life while he was in that state. Under such circumstances, Enoch would not experience the pangs of death. Then “he was nowhere to be found,” apparently because Jehovah disposed of his body, even as he disposed of Moses’ body. (Deuteronomy 34:5, 6)
      Enoch lived 365 years—not nearly as long as most of his contemporaries. But the important thing for lovers of Jehovah is that they serve him faithfully to the end of their days. We know that Enoch did that because “before his transference he had the witness that he had pleased God well.” The Scriptures do not disclose how Jehovah communicated this to Enoch. Nevertheless, before Enoch died, he was given assurance of God’s approval, and we can be certain that Jehovah will remember him in the resurrection.
      Does the Bible Quote From the Book of Enoch?
      The Book of Enoch is an apocryphal and pseudepigraphic text. It is falsely ascribed to Enoch. Produced probably sometime during the second and first centuries B.C.E., it is a collection of extravagant and unhistorical Jewish myths, evidently the product of exegetical elaborations on the brief Genesis reference to Enoch. This alone is sufficient for lovers of GodÂ’s inspired Word to dismiss it.
      In the Bible, only the book of Jude contains Enoch’s prophetic words: “Look! Jehovah came with his holy myriads, to execute judgment against all, and to convict all the ungodly concerning all their ungodly deeds that they did in an ungodly way, and concerning all the shocking things that ungodly sinners spoke against him.” (Jude 14, 15) Many scholars contend that Enoch’s prophecy against his ungodly contemporaries is quoted directly from the Book of Enoch. Is it possible that Jude used an unreliable apocryphal book as his source?
      How Jude knew of EnochÂ’s prophecy is not revealed in the Scriptures. He may simply have quoted a common source, a reliable tradition handed down from remote antiquity. Paul evidently did something similar when he named Jannes and Jambres as the otherwise anonymous magicians of PharaohÂ’s court who opposed Moses. If the writer of the Book of Enoch had access to an ancient source of this kind, why should we deny it to Jude?*
      (Exodus 7:11, 22; 2 Timothy 3:8)
      How Jude received the information about Enoch’s message to the ungodly is a minor matter. Its reliability is attested to by the fact that Jude wrote under divine inspiration. (2 Timothy 3:16) God’s holy spirit guarded him from stating anything that was not true. 
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      When I was a boy, I heard my father give the Society's hour talk on the book of Job about 10 times. The talk spent a good portion of the time showing that Behemoth was a hippopotamus, and Leviathan was a crocodile.
      Of course, very little time was spent on the fact that the book of Job also says the following about the Behemoth, which is not at all true of a hippo:
      (Job 40:15-20) 15 Here, now, is Be·heʹmoth, which I made as I made you. . . . 17 It stiffens [or, sways] its tail like a cedar; The sinews of its thighs are woven together. 18 Its bones are tubes of copper; Its limbs are like wrought-iron rods. 19 It ranks first [or, "it is the beginning" -- NWT footnote] among the works of God; Only its Maker can approach it with his sword. 20 For the mountains produce food for it, Where all the wild animals play.
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      The Leviathan is even less like a crocodile than Behemoth is like a hippo. Note:
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      Job 40:15-23 But look now you are familiar with "monsters" [Behemoth]; they eat grass like cows. Look now its strength is in its loins, and its power in its belly's navel. It stood up its tail like a cypress, and its sinews have been interwoven. Its flanks are flanks of copper, and its spine is cast iron. . . . This is the chief of what the Lord created, made to be mocked at by his angels. But when it went up on a steep mountain, it brought its gladness to the quadrupeds in Tartarus. . . . If there is a flood, it will never take notice. {*It trusts that the Jordan will tumble into its mouth.}
      Job 40:25-41:26 [Masoretic 41:1-34] And will you catch a dragon [Leviathan] with a fish hook? . . . And do nations feed on it, and do the Phoenician races divvy it up? And a whole fleet, gathered, cannot carry the mere skin of its tail. {and its head in fisherman's boats}. But you will lay a hand on it, though you remember the battle that is waging in its body, and let it happen no more! . . . Who will uncover the front of what it is wearing? And who could enter the plate of its cuirass? Who will open the gates of its face? Fear is all around its teeth. Its inwards are bronze shields. . . . Light shines forth at its sneezing and its eyes have the look of the morning star. From its mouth proceed flaming torches, and fiery braziers are being cast forth. From its nostrils smoke of a furnace burning with the fire of coals. Its soul is coals, and a flame proceeds from its mouth. . . . Its heart is solid like stone, and it stands like an unyielding anvil. . . . It makes the deep boil like a caldron and regards the sea as a pot of ointment and Tartarus of the deep as a captive. . . . There is nothing else on earth like it, made to be mocked at by my angels. Everything high it sees, and it is king over all that are in the waters.
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