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JAMMY

How do you view death?

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I like this idea.

Although imagine talking to your grandchildren... saying... there is great grandma... somewhere in that tree! ;-)

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I view death just as the Bible tell me, the dead are in a deep sleep! Which Jehovah will awaken someday.

But, out off all the deaths,I have experienced it's nothing like loosing a child,out off the blue. 01/01/15, that day the person came to my home with that news , I haven't been the same. I only had two sons, no grandchildren. I am from a large family, only three are serving Jehovah, so I need all the special prayer from all my sisters and brothers.

thank you

GiGi

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How do I view my own death?  Troublesome, because I'd hate to miss seeing my grandkids grow up and I'd really like to be married to my current wife in the new world.  Those would be two of the stings of death I suppose.

How do I view the death of others?  For them if they died in the condition of having Jehovah's approval, it's almost like being called safe at 3rd base. (Successfully coming out of the 1000 yr reign would be safe at home)  They'll make it into the new world.  Hurrah for them!  'Course, till then, I'd miss them. 

One sister in our area came down with fatal cancer.  But before she died, she said that she'd rather just quickly die now, safely in Jehovah's hands, knowing she'd be waking up soon cancer free, rather than go through the possible lingering ravages of that disease.  And that happened.

 

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