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The Librarian -
Srecko Sostar -
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2 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Bad things happens to all of us, in home, kindergarten, school, workplace, on holidays ....etc.

Well, choice to doing "normal" stuff as going to higher education is, have to be matter of your personal choice and NOT RESULT OF DOGMATIC TEACHING, INSTRUCTION, ADVICE, COMMENDATION of Church Leaders. 

About "stupidity". There is two sort of that connected to comment i made. One came from naivete , inexperience, or natural lack of reasoning for some stuff. Other came because we alone make us (and with help of others people too) to believe something and have strong feeling how we make best decision.

Religion (and not only religion) have that power to make us so sure in wrong things. Don't you think the same?      

Yes I agree with your last sentence. I first learnt the JW teachings from my brother. I had always believed and relied on my 'big' brother for advice as he always seemed sensible and balanced. My father died, at age 49, when i was only 20, so my brother acted as a father to me in many ways.  So, I took what my brother said as 'truth' in many matters .... However, now I've grown older and have more experience in life, i have come to realise that not all things my brother said were 'truth', to the point that i now know that he would use things to his own advantage. 

And as I've said before the JW Org have a way of telling congregants not to question anything they say. And once again when a person gets older or wiser, then they do their own research, they find that not all JW teachings are true. 

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6 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Bad things happens to all of us, in home, kindergarten, school, workplace, on holidays ....etc.

Indeed, granted most areas are considered Soft Targets, anything can happen at any given time, on the other side of the spectrum, there are those who are haunted by and experience and the like.

6 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Well, choice to doing "normal" stuff as going to higher education is, have to be matter of your personal choice and NOT RESULT OF DOGMATIC TEACHING, INSTRUCTION, ADVICE, COMMENDATION of Church Leaders. 

Indeed you have the choice, but the fact of the matter doing such would hinder any connection with God or not. The only thing you cannot have a choice about is the type of people you will be around, a stoner, a sex addict, someone who is seeking you out, a manipulator, etc. I have been down this road before.

And no, the teachings are not dogmatic, as we have examples in Scripture already. The bottom line is not losing one's connection and or relationship with God, which is something that can easily be lost in things that tend to take up time.

If you want an experience of mine, 3 of my professors had issues with being overly religious, one of the 3 attempted to fail me because he felt that me reading the Bible was disgracing him since he was homosexual, and assumes that I 100% hateful towards gays of which I am not. I simply told him I do not hate him as a person, just not someone in favor of his conduct and I simply pulled verses in Ephesians. For when he, came out of the closet, so to speak.

Clearly it didn't change his view of me, but it is evident that he was clearly not a fan of the Bible, on one occasion he tried to test me, to show me in the Bible homosexuality was not sin, that Jesus would have accepted it,but he failed miserably. A good thing that semester, that was a war zone, had been done away with and completed.

Our Church Fathers were educated, and if one did the research, they'd look at their backgrounds, I explained this to you months ago already.

6 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

About "stupidity". There is two sort of that connected to comment i made. One came from naivete , inexperience, or natural lack of reasoning for some stuff. Other came because we alone make us (and with help of others people too) to believe something and have strong feeling how we make best decision.

What?

6 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Religion (and not only religion) have that power to make us so sure in wrong things. Don't you think the same?      

Religion and or our faith is the best education we have, who does not want to read and understand things about God and his Word?

And because of faith by means of Christ-like practices to be in application in our lives, it helps a lot, examples, a man who is of Christ knows not to commit a type of sin in regards to desire of the flesh vs. someone who does not - very simple.

That being said, it didn't take religion to see how the system in the realm of education is seen being played out by others, hence the rate we see today.

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JW people often emphasize how old Israelite's were all educated and could read and write and nations around them are less educated. Question. What levels of education have existed at that time in the nation of Israel. Just to know read and write? Or, what was equivalent for education, in their time, we called today high school and university? 

Did elders of Israel congregation teaching young people /male and female/  not to educate self more in various knowledge's, that is not only spiritual aka religious? Did they talking to people; Israel Nation and State and Country is just temporary here on Earth, God will destroy all on Earth, so why to loosing your time in seeking for "worldly" knowledge, even inside Israel Land Boarders?  :)) 

For a contrary, they believed  how they will stay there Forever and have Kingdom Forever.

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Their problem is not with higher education, the issue of the matter is that they want their faith community to put God first, adhering to the verse in question, Matthew 6:33. The misconception is that they detest and or hate higher education, the thing is, they are not ignorant to the fact that young ones need an income to live and whatnot, therefore must seek out a trade by going to a Technical School, some College and or Uni, etc, some youth out there are self taught and or abide by the trade teachings of their relatives.

Another factor is Uni has become borderline "Communist" and the narrative of which they interject into the youth nowadays is a string of ideologies, political grooming, if one is not careful. And some of the college life is brazen and immoral, for any Christian parent wouldn't want to come to the discover of their child doing something immoral, let alone become victim in the colleges, i.e. real life experience, which I had mentioned several times regarding a late friend whose situation blew up resulting in her suicide, and there has been countless examples, especially the one with the case.

Higher Education is both a blessing and a curse, as is, very narrow, should one not be as careful. Clearly, you have not scratched the surface of the realm of Uni/College life as have some who look into those things, then again, some of you, Atheists, tend to thrive in all aspects of such, ahem, the athlete and his father regarding one victim...

That being said, it is usually women that are often victims in sex/violent cases in colleges and Uni.

You either go there to study and work towards a degree for a decent job or you go there to party, and between the lines, there is and always will be consequences, of which the stupid and the ignorant do not know about.

All and all, all you got is jokes - no solutions to the problem, reasons why such ones like Mr. Turner nearly got off easy, and those like him.

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On 11/30/2019 at 1:57 PM, Jack Ryan said:
 

"A casualty on the altar of education..."

Nothing Culty here.... Not at all /s

It can't get any clearer: "LIsten to Jehovah's voice!" is a direct claim to inspiration by the Governing Body.

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 Quote @TrueTomHarley Today Witness parents are encouraged to take an active role in their offspring's future plans so that they will be able to support themselves decently. 

Yes, so was that actually true about 'not letting them have a driving licence if they don't get baptised' ? 

 

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