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¿Por qué murieron 400 tortugas en El Salvador?

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La tormenta tropical Selma golpeó las costas salvadoreñas el 28 de octubre con ráfagas de viento de 70 kilómetros por hora y provocó que el 1 de noviembre flotarán quelonios muertos en el mar.

El Salvador

La muerte de alrededor de 400 tortugas marinas en la costa Pacífico de El Salvador se debió a la proliferación de saxitoxinas producto de la tormenta tropical Selma, que ingresó a este país el 28 de octubre, informó Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (MARN).

"La mortandad de tortugas fue consecuencia de dos fenómenos combinados: Tormenta tropical Selma y saxitoxinas, según los estudios preliminares", precisó en su cuenta en Twitter el MARN.

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Leer más: http://www.milenio.com/internacional/mueren_tortugas-tormenta_selma-viral-el_salvador-milenio-noticias_0_1064293814.html

 

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