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Space is full of dirty, toxic grease, scientists reveal

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This definitely changes my opinion of interstellar space travel.

Star Trek ships should be black then.... ;-)

I'm the first person in history to patent the idea of a interstellar spaceship wash. Only $100 million and we will throw in the wax.

Oh... the spaceships will need "windshield wipers"

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"Windshields  wipers"   in   UNIVERSE...   bec. raining ?  :D

I  also  not  want  *space - travelling*.....    thats  why :

What  a  metal  waste  around  the  earth ;-(    and  the  toxic  waste...

28..  6....jpg

https://www.focus.de/wissen/videos/vulkanausbrueche-und-die-anden-von-oben-aus-dieser-perspektive-haben-sie-die-erde-noch-nie-gesehen_id_5420250.html

nasfeat.jpg

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