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I Am,” a Poem by a 10-Year-Old Boy With Autism, Is Going Viral and Spreading Big Emotions

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Guest Nicole

Poetry class in elementary school just got a lot more real. 

The National Autism Association shared a poem by a 10-year-old boy living with autism spectrum disorder on its Facebook page, and it's making a lot of people very emotional. 

 

I am odd, I am new
I wonder if you are too
I hear voices in the air
I see you don't, and that's not fair
I want to not feel blue
I am odd, I am new
I pretend that you are too
I feel like a boy in outer space
I touch the stars and feel out of place
I worry what others might think
I cry when people laugh, it makes me shrink
I am odd, I am new
I understand now that so are you
I say I, "feel  like a castaway"
I dream of a day that thats okay
I try to fit in
I hope that someday I do
I am odd, I am new.

 

Source: http://mic.com/articles/141033/this-poem-by-a-10-year-old-boy-with-autism-is-giving-people-all-the-feelings#.UxTVXSfQ3

NGM3MWE0ZGIwMSMvWmhxOTlvWmd4Rnh3YlhwbDJCYXJ6VFhMQWlRPS8yM3gxMjoyMzczeDEzODgvNzYweDQ0NS9maWx0ZXJzOnF1YWxpdHkoNzApL2h0dHA6Ly9zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tL3BvbGljeW1pYy1pbWFnZXMvOGZydHppdjM3dXAzajR2ZDh6cjI4eWl4dXVrMndiZzJ3cHF4MGF.jpg

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On 4/19/2016 at 7:50 PM, Guest Nicole said:

Poetry class in elementary school just got a lot more real. 

The National Autism Association shared a poem by a 10-year-old boy living with autism spectrum disorder on its Facebook page, and it's making a lot of people very emotional. 

 

I am odd, I am new
I wonder if you are too
I hear voices in the air
I see you don't, and that's not fair
I want to not feel blue
I am odd, I am new
I pretend that you are too
I feel like a boy in outer space
I touch the stars and feel out of place
I worry what others might think
I cry when people laugh, it makes me shrink
I am odd, I am new
I understand now that so are you
I say I, "feel  like a castaway"
I dream of a day that thats okay
I try to fit in
I hope that someday I do
I am odd, I am new.

 

Source: http://mic.com/articles/141033/this-poem-by-a-10-year-old-boy-with-autism-is-giving-people-all-the-feelings#.UxTVXSfQ3

NGM3MWE0ZGIwMSMvWmhxOTlvWmd4Rnh3YlhwbDJCYXJ6VFhMQWlRPS8yM3gxMjoyMzczeDEzODgvNzYweDQ0NS9maWx0ZXJzOnF1YWxpdHkoNzApL2h0dHA6Ly9zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tL3BvbGljeW1pYy1pbWFnZXMvOGZydHppdjM3dXAzajR2ZDh6cjI4eWl4dXVrMndiZzJ3cHF4MGF.jpg

Thanks for sharing !

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