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The Harmful Effects of Vaping

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SUPPORTERS of vaping claim it is a way for smokers to quit and it is also a “lesser evil” than conventional cigarettes.

But new research suggests vaping increases the level of DNA-damaging compounds. If cells cannot repair DNA damage the risk of cancer can increase, say scientists.

The study analysed the saliva and mouth cells of five e-cigarette users before and after a 15-minute vaping session. Researchers found increased levels of toxic chemicals formaldehyde, acrolein and methylglyoxal

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The tiny pod of e-liquid in a Juul has the 

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 — an entire pack — according to the company's website.

Most educators, parents and students "don't realize how much nicotine is in there, or that there's even any nicotine," she says. "That's what the research tells us."

Bolcoa works with students as part of the 

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 team, a club at high schools backed by Jefferson County's Tobacco-Free Youth program, to educate students, parents and administrators about the larger risks of tobacco use and Juuls. An educational video the team posted on Facebook tells viewers that "Juuls and other e-products are disguised to look like pens, flash drives."

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Study: Lead and Other Toxic Metals Found in E-Cigarette ‘Vapors’

 

POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS LEVELS OF METALS LEAK FROM SOME E-CIGARETTE HEATING COILS

Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

In the study, published online in Environmental Health Perspectives on February 21, the scientists examined e-cigarette devices owned by a sample of 56 users. They found that significant numbers of the devices generated aerosols with potentially unsafe levels of lead, chromium, manganese and/or nickel. Chronic inhalation of these metals has been linked to lung, liver, immune, cardiovascular and brain damage, and even cancers.

The Food and Drug Administration has the authority to regulate e-cigarettes but is still considering how to do so. The finding that e-cigarettes expose users—known as vapers—to what may be harmful levels of toxic metals could make this issue a focus of future FDA rules.

“It’s important for the FDA, the e-cigarette companies and vapers themselves to know that these heating coils, as currently made, seem to be leaking toxic metals—which then get into the aerosols that vapers inhale,” says study senior author Ana María Rule, PhD, MHS, an assistant scientist in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Environmental Health and Engineering.

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