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Reasoning on the Rules

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    • By JOHN BUTLER
      Luke 10 v 21  In that very hour he became overjoyed in the holy spirit and said: “I publicly praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have carefully hidden these things from wise and intellectual ones and have revealed them to young children. Yes, O Father, because this is the way you approved.
      This seems to show that 'higher education' was not needed to learn, understand and teach, the truth from God, at that time. 
      It seems to be a well know thing within the JW Org and by people outside of same, that JW's are 'told' not to aim for higher education. I say told, although some will say strongly advised, with a possible caution of being disfellowshipped. 
      Now I've noticed on here recently that deep conversation about many things has been and is taking place. Politics earthwide. religious beliefs earthwide and the latest thing seems to be Evolution (from a very deep standpoint ). ( These things were never taught to me at school. )
      I left school at 15 years old, as soon as I was able, for reasons previously mentioned. Here in UK now teenagers have to remain in education until they are 18. The three years from 15 to 18 seem to me to be almost 'higher education', but compulsory.  How much they learn at school now I've no idea. 
      My feelings are, and yes ok i cannot put proof to these feelings, but, my feelings are, that all forms of higher education are advised against by the GB and the JW Org. Some of you may have some proof of this in writing. So, where does this leave JW's ?
      If a young person leaves school to go into full time 'service' ministry, they do not get a higher education. Their 'basic' education may have been just that, very basic. They are then not 'qualified' to talk to others on a higher education level, and this might even be to the point of not understanding such things as are being discussed on here lately. 
      ( Much of what is being discussed leaves me miles behind. I'm a very simple person. Plus at 69 I forget more than i learn. Yes I do write lots of notes and have books for recording different things, but the mind boggles. )
      With respect for those I knew and loved in the past, within my ex congregation, many of them were 'simple country folk'. And I think Tom said about not having the time or inclination to do research online or or otherwise. So let us go back to the scripture at the top. 
      So many questions. Does God reveal more to those of a lesser education ?  Is higher education and greater knowledge a disadvantage when wanting to serve God properly?
      Or is it that those of higher education are too stubborn to learn God's way ?  Too proud maybe ?   
      There are many things that the Bible doesn't tell us. is that deliberate ? Does God want to keep it simple for us ? So, should we pursue more knowledge about worldly things ? 
      A problem may occur when talking to others about God, in that they may have more knowledge on a certain subject than we do and therefore believe something different. Should we then educate ourselves to their level on the same subject, or just pass them by ?  Bearing in mind the scripture at the top of this page. 
      There has to be a balance of course. But my feelings are that the GB would like JW's to be educated only by the Watchtower studies and by the 'workbook' evening meeting studies. And of course by personal Bible reading.   But do JW's do as they are told in this respect or do a lot of them 'educate themselves', or take further education elsewhere ? 
       
       
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    • Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Having a hard time with a house rule? This article and the accompanying worksheet will help you talk to your parents about it.
      The right outlook
      Myth: When you leave home, you’ll be done with rules once and for all.
      Fact: Rules don’t go away when you move out. You’ll still have to answer to someone—perhaps an employer, a landlord, or even the government. “I think young people who can’t obey rules at home will be in for a big shock when they live on their own,” says 19-year-old Danielle.
      The Bible says: “Be obedient to governments and authorities.” (Titus 3:1) Learning to deal with your parents’ rules is good training for what you will face in other areas of life as an adult.
      What you can do: Learn to look at the bright side of rules. “My parents’ rules really helped me learn how to choose my friends and manage my time,” says a young man named Jeremy. “Also, the rules kept me from watching too much TV and playing too many video games and allowed me to find more productive activities—some of which I still enjoy.”
       The right approach
      But what if a rule doesn’t seem to make sense? For example, a young woman named Tamara says: “My parents allowed me to travel to another country, but now that I’m back home, they won’t even let me drive to a city that’s just 20 minutes away!”
      If you are in a similar situation, would it be wrong to talk to your parents about the rule? Not at all! The key is to know when and how to talk to them about it.
      When. “Only after you have built up a track record of trust by being responsible are you in a position to talk to your parents about adjusting a rule,” says a teenager named Amanda.
      A girl named Daria found that to be true. “It wasn’t until my mom saw my consistent obedience that she considered making a change,” she says. Remember, trust is something you earn, not something you demand.

      Living in a household where parental rules are not followed would be like trying to land at an airport where air traffic rules are not obeyed
      The Bible says: “Observe . . . the commandment of your father, and do not forsake the instruction of your mother.” (Proverbs 6:20) By following that admonition, you will build up a record of trust with your parents and have a basis for discussion with them.
      How. “Being respectful and calm is always a better way to communicate with your parents than whining and yelling,” says a young man named Steven.
      Daria, quoted earlier, agrees. “When I would argue with my mom, nothing would change,” she says. “In fact, sometimes she would make the rule even more strict.”
      The Bible says: “A stupid person gives vent to all his feelings, but the wise one calmly keeps them in check.” (Proverbs 29:11) Learning self-control will have a huge payoff, not only at home but also at school, at work, and elsewhere.
      What you can do: Think before you speak. A track record of trustworthy behavior can be undone by a fit of rage. For good reason, the Bible says that “the one who is slow to anger has great discernment.”—Proverbs 14:29.
      Tip: Use the accompanying worksheet to reason on rules, and if needed, have a discussion with your parents about this topic.
      What your peers say
      “Rules teach a young person to be respectful and have self-control—qualities that are vital even in adulthood. Without rules, there would be no sense of direction in my life or boundaries to stay within.”—Kimberleigh.
      “At those times when I thought my parents’ rules were unfair, I had usually just done something to break their trust or I wanted to do something that wouldn’t have been good for me. I realize now that my parents’ rules were for my benefit.”—Kaley.
      Are House Rules Really Necessary.mp3
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