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RACE TO 2020: Minnesota’s Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar announced her bid for presidency...

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1 hour ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

She, covered with snow, and in single digit temperatures, just happens to be a firm believer in man caused "Global Warming"

Trump made the same mistake in implying (a tweet) that snow and cold temperatures somehow contradict the idea of global warming. Global warming is currently a fact of life. The question, as you indicate, is how much of the global warming is man-made and how much we could do about it at this point, even if it is.

There are some silly beliefs about global warming. Some ignore the typical cycles the earth is still expected to go through over the next millennia and further, assuming there are no catastrophic interventions of any kind. Others ignore the massive increases in "greenhouse" gases that are produced by corporations, and act like regulating the the rate of reduction in some areas and regulating the rate of growth in some areas (of environmental damage) is the answer. Others try to put all the guilt on the aggregate total of private consumers and automobile owners as the problem, when this is so minor compared to effects of business manufacturing and distribution.  But another kind of silliness is the denial that greenhouse gases can produce a now-predictable influence on climate, and that the current excess of man-made greenhouse gases provides the most likely explanation for the average yearly rises in global temperature.

 

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