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Persecutors Pile on Jehovah’s Witnesses, in Russia and Worldwide

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Guest Indiana

Even Putin has suggested that the campaign against the religious minority may be unwarranted.

Christians are the most widely persecuted religious believers around the globe. They are the most numerous people of faith worldwide. They also tend to evangelize, threatening established religions. Moreover, especially in some Muslim nations, local Christians are assumed to be strong supporters of Israel and agents of America and U.S. foreign policy. The result is an increasingly tenuous existence for Christians in many lands.

However, smaller faiths tend to face more intense hostility. Jews, of course, are the traditional scapegoats for numerous ills. Bahá’is are seen by Muslims as apostates. And Jehovah’s Witnesses now are under sustained attack in Russia.

JWs, as they are known (and call themselves), might seem an odd addition to that list. While active, their numbers remain relatively low, about 8.5 million worldwide. Their largest national home is America. The next two are Mexico and Brazil, which exist in a region with the least religious persecution. JWs reject any political role. They do not threaten the existing order anywhere.

Yet Russia has imposed a six-year sentence on a Danish JW, Dennis Christensen, for “organizing the activity of an extremist organization.” In 2016 the government recognized the JW faith as “extremist”; the following year the country’s supreme court ruled the JW church to be an “extremist organization” and banned it. Although Christensen knew that his faith had been outlawed, explained the prosecutor, the JW unsurprisingly continued to proselytize, hold meetings, and distribute literature. He was arrested in May 2017 at a worship service and is now set to serve six years in a penal colony — which will be decidedly less pleasant than the prisons in Christensen’s homeland.

Unfortunately, he is not the only such victim of Russian persecution. Last year Moscow launched a vigorous nationwide campaign against JWs. Earlier this month the world headquarters of Jehovah’s Witnesses published a special report, “Russia: State-Sponsored Persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses Continues.”

From September 2017 to January 2019, the church reported, the Putin government has mounted 300 raids, mostly of homes. Twenty-three people have been jailed, 27 have been placed under house arrest, 41 have been ordered to remain in their hometown, and 121 have been placed under investigation. The church has complained that government security agents use “heavy-handed tactics against the Witnesses as though they were dealing with hardened criminals. The authorities point guns in the face of Witnesses, including children and the elderly — and manhandle them.” Property worth $90 million is subject to confiscation. More than 100 properties, including the large administrative center, have already been seized, and some 300 more face confiscation.

The report goes on to list the other JWs facing charges. They should not be forgotten.

Three currently are on trial: Sergey Skrynnikov, Yuriy Zalipayev, and Arkadya Akopyan. (The latter is 71 years old.)

In pretrial detention are Aleksandr Akopov, Vladimir Atryakhin, Dmitriy Barmakin, Konstantin Bazhenov, Sergey Britvin, Aleksey Budenchuk, Sergey Klimov, Vadim Levchuk, Feliks Makhammadiyev, Valeriy Moskalenko, Georgiy Nikulin, Andrzej Oniszczuk, Konstantin Samsonov, Yuriy Savelyev, Andrey Sazonov, Aleksandr Shevchuk, Nataliya Sorokina, Yevgeniy Spirin, Andrey Stupnikov, Shamil Sultanov, Yeveniy Suvorkov, and Mariya Troshina.

Such a campaign might be appropriate against a terrorist organization. But against a group of religious believers whose behavior is decidedly harmless? The armed assaults demonstrate that the Russian government is determined to halt private worship as well as organizational activity.

For targeting JWs and other peaceful religious minorities, Russia has been designated a “country of particular concern” by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. In its annual report on persecutors worldwide, USCIRF observed that the Putin government has “continued to target ‘nontraditional’ religious minorities, including Jehovah’s Witnesses and Scientologists, with fines, detentions, and criminal charges under the pretext of combating extremism. Most notably, the Jehovah’s Witnesses were banned outright, as was their translation of the Bible, and their followers persecuted nationwide.”

Although Russia has gained the distinction of being just about the only majority-Christian country to persecute, it is not the only nation to ban JWs. Twenty-six Muslim nations do so, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and even reasonably liberal Kuwait, as well as Saudi Arabia, Iran, Somalia, and Yemen. Several are Communist, such as China, North Korea, and Vietnam, or formerly Communist. Eritrea, Lebanon, and Singapore are also on the list.

Why such hostility? The sect was founded in the U.S. in the 1870s. Its doctrines, including non-trinitarianism and teachings on the role of Jesus Christ, differ significantly from those of traditional Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic. JWs rely on their own biblical translation, have a unique eschatology, and are noted for rejecting blood transfusions and refusing to celebrate traditional religious holidays. However, being different isn’t reason for persecution. (I have several JW relatives and friends. Their theology is not for me, but they are uniformly warm, decent people.)

More significant, perhaps, is the separationist nature of JWs. An intense community rather like the Amish, they expel members through disfellowship. They refuse to accord government the respect that public officials crave or to honor the state — to say the Pledge of Allegiance in America, for example, or to serve in the military anywhere. Such attitudes may have generated the Russian claim that they are guilty of “social hostility.” Presumably they are seen as focusing on those within their community rather than without.

Moscow denies that it is persecuting JWs for their beliefs. Rather, explained Vyacheslav Lebedev, chief justice of the Russian Supreme Court, “the situation is actually being presented as if these people are being persecuted for their belief and religious activity. Yet the decision, which was made by the Supreme Court amongst others, is unrelated to religion. It is about a violation of the law, which religious organizations have no right to breach.”

The law bans the faith, so punishing them for exercising their faith is merely punishing a violation of the law. This argument is perfectly Orwellian. Translating Lebedev: We declared your religious faith to be extremist, and you are not allowed to be extremists. So we are arresting you for being extremists. But feel free to practice your faith and have a good day.

Some critics appear to imagine that they are dealing with something akin to al-Qaeda. For instance, Roman Silantyev of Moscow State Linguistic University complained that “this sect promotes external and inner extremism, inciting hatred to those who think and believe in a different way and bullying their own members.” He went on to claim that “recognizing this sect as extremist gave a possibility to dozens of our citizens to leave this concentration camp.” Silantyev appears not to understand religion: Despite the threat of arrest and prison, JWs continue to meet, because they are operating out of faith rather than compulsion.

JWs also are known for evangelism, highlighted by their going door to door. This stirs harsh resistance by majority faiths, especially those that are as much political as religious. The Russian Orthodox Church is hostile even to traditional Christian faiths. It would be difficult for its hierarchy to advocate banning Catholic and Protestant churches with roots as deep as its own, but JWs are an easier target.

President Vladimir Putin admitted as much. When asked why his government targeted JWs, Putin dismissed the charge. But, he admitted, “our society does not consist solely of religious sects. Ninety percent of citizens of the Russian Federation or so consider themselves Orthodox Christians. . . . It is also necessary to take into account the country and the society in which we live.” Translation: JW’s are different and don’t fit in. This attitude also may explain attacks by groups and individuals on JWs, their homes, and meeting halls.

Putin offered a glimmer of hope in December when he allowed that one should not “label representatives of religious communities as member of destructive, much less terrorist organizations” and acknowledged that he did not “quite understand why they are persecuted,” so “this should be looked into, this must be done.” Although Putin’s references to human rights should be treated with more than a few grains of salt, he appears to respect religion, and these comments are hard to explain other than as an expression of genuine puzzlement over so much effort being expended to eliminate an evidently nonexistent threat.

Russia’s persecution of JWs pales compared with the punishment, including violence, inflicted on religious minorities elsewhere. Consider the horrors that continue to afflict religious minorities in the Middle East. Conflict zones in Iraq and Syria have shrunk, but Christians, Yazidis, and others continue to be at risk. Both sides of the Sunni–Shia divide, represented by Saudi Arabia and Iran, are inhospitable homes for non-Muslims, as well as for the “wrong” Muslims. American client states, such as Afghanistan and Iraq, are little better.

 

Nevertheless, the precarious status of JWs worldwide shows the breadth and reach of the problem of religious persecution. In Russia, thousands of people, largely ignored owing to their small numbers and relative isolation, are being punished for their faith, persecuted for no plausible reason. The arbitrariness of the state is matched only by the hardship inflicted on the affected individuals and families.

The freedom of Jehovah’s Witnesses should be on the religious-liberty agenda. Indeed, given the concern expressed even by Putin, American and European officials should raise the issue when they meet their Russian counterparts. The agenda with Russia is crowded. However, liberty of conscience is always worth defending. Especially when success doesn’t require armed campaigns and regime change.

    Hello guest!

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53 minutes ago, Indiana said:

Although Christensen knew that his faith had been outlawed, explained the prosecutor, the JW unsurprisingly continued to proselytize, hold meetings, and distribute literature

They actually don’t distribute literature there. Their proselytizing consists of only speaking from the Bible itself. They have conformed to all laws, draconian though they may be, and the recent incidences of torture are considered by believers to be efforts to manufacture evidence that they are not.

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Oh, and here from the article is another example of 1984: 

“The law bans the faith, so punishing them for exercising their faith is merely punishing a violation of the law. This argument is perfectly Orwellian. Translating Lebedev: We declared your religious faith to be extremist, and you are not allowed to be extremists. So we are arresting you for being extremists. But feel free to practice your faith and have a good day.”

Does it square with other applications of 1984 that you have seen, @James Thomas Rook Jr.?

 

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1 hour ago, Indiana said:

President Vladimir Putin admitted as much. When asked why his government targeted JWs, Putin dismissed the charge. But, he admitted, “our society does not consist solely of religious sects. Ninety percent of citizens of the Russian Federation or so consider themselves Orthodox Christians. . . . It is also necessary to take into account the country and the society in which we live.” Translation: JW’s are different and don’t fit in. This attitude also may explain attacks

Violence of all sort is unacceptable, intolerable. But, we all participate in it in some way, to some extent. Think about it!!

Now please, go to past and recall how God's chosen people, named Israel, dealt with people who didn't fit in their society. 

Now, go in today reality of another God's chosen people aka Jehovah's Witnesses. In their society the  rules     are based on similar or same "principles". Person from out side, aka "worldly people", or "questionable" member, don't fit in also. Yes, JW members do not put problematic member or ex-JW into prison, Siberia etc, but they also have "violent" methods on how to deal with such one. These methods are shunning, ignoring, conditioning.

Yes, exposing another man, your neighbor, even family member, to such types of church punishments because he/she do not fit to your religious ideas and customs (doctrinal matters) is showing strong violence and cruelty, with same or similar effects as physical violence.  

If some JW people try to look in desired future time, according to his/her hope, then we have another level of possible violence that major group, aka all JW worshipers in New World, will show to all individuals who will not fit to JW picture of life in Paradise under JW Society Condition. And what that will be, how will it look like? Maybe we can found out something from history and present time of all this God's Worshipers! 

 

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57 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

They have conformed to all laws,

What reports, who confirms this claim?

JW literature was always give reports and experience how members obeyed more god aka organizational WT instructions than governments. Secret meetings, secret preaching, secret transport of publications, hiding of all sorts. JW History not supports claim you presented.

I am living Witness, because lived in part of the world where JW activity was cca 2/3 free, 1/3 not tolerated.

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It’s pretty well documented that they may removed literature from their Kingdom Halls and public ministry long ago. Whether some have it squirreled away in other places, I wouldn’t know. I would think it unlikely because nobody is crowing about finding it. When police did find some at Kingdom Halls, security cameras clearly showed they had planted it there themselves.

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9 hours ago, TrueTomHarley said:

It’s pretty well documented that they may removed literature from their Kingdom Halls

Possible.  Do you know where they removed literature? In recycling paper boxes? Or in basements?  

9 hours ago, TrueTomHarley said:

When police did find some at Kingdom Halls, security cameras clearly showed they had planted it there themselves.

Maybe police playing this game with "theocratic warfare" rules. 

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13 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Maybe police playing this game with "theocratic warfare" rules. 

I think they are finding it a challenge operating in a land where the constitution says they can be Jehovah’s Witnesses but the law says they can be Jehovah’s Witnesses as long as they are not Jehovah’s Witnesses. This may make perfect sense to you, but I think they are finding it a challenge.

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31 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

in a land where the constitution says they can be Jehovah’s Witnesses but the law says they can be Jehovah’s Witnesses as long as they are not Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Sort of Patriot law, or anti-terror legislative as in other countries. Question is, what inspired, motivated Russian government to put JW on list. JW people "preaching"? JW Religious legislative and teachings can be in some aspects recognized as "extremism". And they are. So, why to be so surprised with measures of states? They protect their interests, as WT protects their interests too.

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On 3/1/2019 at 12:41 PM, TrueTomHarley said:

1984

I love that book. With each chapter, with each situation, you start to realize how things of today mirrors that of the book of George Orwell. That being said, it is very tragic as to how no one sees the timeline, and or the truth of the matter with all things Russia, you'd think people vanishing off the streets in some parts of Russia was a red flag, but no.

The irony is, such ones would applaud Russia and side with them on their actions, but in the end, they would be overwhelmed by the one they called and saw as an ally. Reminds me of the Harlot and the beast, and how the beast turned on her.

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@BillyTheKid46 Russian torture is something that not many Russians talk about. Those who commit these acts would claim it is not true until information and or proof of it surfaces, and then suddenly after it surfaces, it as if it does not exist, but the scars it left on the victims and their family persists. Things such as this example: 

    Hello guest!

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By now, news of the vicious anti-LGBT campaign in the Russian republic of Chechnya has made its way around the world. The evidence is clear. Hundreds of men have been detained, beaten, humiliated and tortured — for the sole offense of being who they are. Russian reporters have confirmed at least three extrajudicial killings. Victims continue to share horrific accounts of torture facilities. The Chechen government’s efforts to deny its crimes are less than convincing. “You cannot detain and persecute people who simply do not exist in the republic,” as one spokesman put it. - 

    Hello guest!

Would WTJWorg take stand for rights of these community too? They are also "persecuted" by the King of the North, and their human rights are violated.

Inside WTJWorg comunity rules not allowed this way of living for people who are what they are, who not fit in. WTJworg  bans that this sort of people come to be JW members and live and practice their way of living. Is this religious stand also sort of "extremism", Patriot law based on religious beliefs?  

Also, as another examples for illustration, we can count this - WTJWorg intolerant view; on worldly education, interfaith marriage, some medical treatments, social contacts with unbelievers (only for purpose of preaching). Very, very poor or complete lack of charity work for non JW community (preaching is not charity work).  

So, if WTJWorg are firm and ready to defend their view on who and how can be part of their community, WHY is so problematic for JW people to recognize and accept how similar and same right have Russian community, nation?

Answer is; have, get your own country, territory and Land Law that suits to your Way of living and Beliefs

 

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16 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Question is, what inspired, motivated Russian government to put JW on list. 

There are three factors at work that come together to make ‘the perfect storm.’

1) Misperceptions due to 100years East-West hostility and the fact that Witness HQ is in the West

2) A dominant house church guarding its turf, where 90+ % identify, though few are devout (or even believers)

3) A fanatical group of irreligious ‘anti-cultists’ who exaggerate or manufacture negatives of the faith while (being atheistic) negating the positives.

#3 is at work everywhere, ever ready to strike the match. In Russia it finds perfect kindling, but it holds out the match everywhere.

 I wrote of it here:

    Hello guest!

6 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Would WTJWorg take stand for rights of these [LGBT] community too? 

They do take a stand. They have categorically renounced violence for any reason throughout their existence. 

What is wrong with you? How can you not know this? 

In my opinion, someone who has been a Witness should not ask a question as stupid as the day is long. It is a perfectly fine question for a non-Witness to ask. But not someone who knows better.

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1 hour ago, TrueTomHarley said:

They do take a stand. They have categorically renounced violence

Sorry, but i can not resist to make little fun on this, with question: Do they (JW) sending Letters to some government, political group or major of town where people and structures not protecting LGBT community enough  or not protecting at all? 

1 hour ago, TrueTomHarley said:

What is wrong with you?

1 hour ago, TrueTomHarley said:

In my opinion, someone who has been a Witness should not ask a question as stupid as the day is long.

Mine stupidity is great :))))) because, as i know, JW members, congregations or WT-HQ, Betel's,  NOT sending Letters pro, in behalf of non -JW people who suffer under some system.

Answer why,is in WTJWorg publications. 

But Letters to Politicians about JW in Russia is ok to send.

It is not about my wrongs, but ....:))))

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1 hour ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Mine stupidity is great :))))) because, as i know, JW members, congregations or WT-HQ, Betel's,  NOT sending Letters pro, in behalf of non -JW people who suffer under some system.

Sigh...how can people be so ridiculous? NOBODY floods the field with letters for every cause under the sun. EVERYONE does it for the cause they hold most dear.

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6 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

Here is an opinion that doesn’t agree with yours, @Srecko Sostar:

    Hello guest!

There is the obligatory jab at POTUS & VP, disliked politically. But the opinion is spot on. And yes, it WOULD be fine if they weighed in, even with many many wrongs to choose from. 

 

I am not sure is it "torture", of any kind, in police/military investigations, legal or illegal by the Law of particular country. Believe it is not. But, if police went over, above permitted methods in investigations of those JW people, than they must be  called for accountability about violence, for sure !!   

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8 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

NOBODY floods the field with letters for every cause under the sun. EVERYONE does it for the cause they hold most dear.

This quote you provide can be more clearly put in this one substitute sentence, and thus reveals  YOUR (or JW view in general ?) secret wishes of heart and state of mind:

JW members are less concerned about suffer of people who are not JW. 

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2 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

JW members are less concerned about suffer of people who are not JW. 

Each of us, no matter who we are, only have a limited number of mental, emotional, physical, and financial resources.  And only so many hours of our lives, which as time goes on, becomes painfully shorter, and filled with concerns of the day.

2 hours ago, Srecko Sostar said:

JW members are less concerned about suffer of people who are not JW. 

OF COURSE THIS IS THE CASE !

Sreko Sostar,  I feel a certain affinity for you because we have seen and experienced many similar things, and have certain common awarenesses ... but will allocate what total resources I have to "Blood or Brotherhood" .... FIRST.

The quickest way to go totally insane is to grieve over things you cannot change ... and as Clint Eastwood, in the Harry Callahan series of movies once said, (paraphrased) ....

" .. A man has got to know his own limitations."

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48 minutes ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

Each of us, no matter who we are, only have a limited number of mental, emotional, physical, and financial resources.  And only so many hours of our lives, which as time goes on, becomes painfully shorter, and filled with concerns of the day.

OF COURSE THIS IS THE CASE !

Sreko Sostar,  I feel a certain affinity for you because we have seen and experienced many similar things, and have certain common awarenesses ... but will allocate what total resources I have to "Blood or Brotherhood" .... FIRST.

The quickest way to go totally insane is to grieve over things you cannot change ... and as Clint Eastwood, in the Harry Callahan series of movies once said, (paraphrased) ....

" .. A man has got to know his own limitations."

Thanks James, same feelings from my side too.

Words, birds of a feather flock together, well says how things are. In ornithology aspects, human have loves for all or almost for all birds. But in aspects of "human birds", human "bird" making choice/choices about other sort of human birds. In common, general aspects that usually ending in prejudice, rejecting, "flocking" in separate societies, groups and similar. Such things around us are "normal". We all were borne in this "normal" life conditions and accepting these ideas as ours too. People of Earth "dreaming" one global, the same "dream". No, matter of the "flock" they temporary belongs, they have common "dream" as heritage from past generations. And in global terms, they all, almost all, are so deep in this dream, but so effective in so called awaken state, that they think they are awake. Dream so deep that make you thinking, feeling you are awake :)))

In that sense, thoughts i am talking about, how your suffer, your tears, your pain, your happiness, your doubts and many other things, it should mean something to me too.

"The sign", no matter of what origin, that others put on our forehead, or we have chosen it by ourselves, is an obstacle, not a blessing.

   

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@Srecko Sostar Ramzan Kadyrov has nothing to do with the ban of JWs. He is part of the Kremlin however his dealings with homosexuals is focused on Chechnya.

That being said, there is a complete timeline of the events and thanks to sources and those who brought down the jesuismadian website, it is evident of what actually took place for the public eye to see.

Lastly, most letters from the faith in question, as is all proclaimed message from anti-corruption folks, Russian folks who lost their homes was pushed to Mevedev, rather than Putin, I would speak of the State Duma, but that is a whole other beast on its own. Evidently, protest erupted in Russia during this, and ironically enough all of this unfolded after Cyrill got his spiritual energy from the south, and the Kremlin was paving the path for Putin to win an election.

If you do not know who this is, it is this guy below:

Ramzan Kadyrov

Related image

 

The middle guy with the and assault rifle and the radio in hand

Image result for chechnya russia leader

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On 3/3/2019 at 9:55 AM, Srecko Sostar said:

JW members are less concerned about suffer of people who are not JW. 

Well...probably...who isn’t? What! Are you going to tell me that you are as concerned about MY suffering as you would be that of a family member?

And just because I acknowledge you will be MOST concerned with the suffering of family, that does not mean that you are UNCONCERNED with the suffering of everyone else. Why would you try to spin it that way with Jehovah’s Witnesses?

 It is no more than Galatians 6:10

Really, then, as long as we have time favorable for it, let us work what is good toward all, but especially toward those related to [us] in the faith.”

What’s wrong with that?

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10 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

Well...probably...who isn’t? What! Are you going to tell me that you are as concerned about MY suffering as you would be that of a family member?

Dear Tom, you over reacted, i expected more balanced understanding of my quote, from you after all at the end. But on other hand you revealed i am on good track with my observations on subject.

15 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

And just because I acknowledge you will be MOST concerned with the suffering of family, that does not mean that you are UNCONCERNED with the suffering of everyone else. Why would you try to spin it that way with Jehovah’s Witnesses?

I understand your worry, but you find my question stupid before, when i asked; Why JW not sending Letters for non-JW  people,  or would JW sending Letters not only on behalf other JW, but on behalf of other who not belong to JW community.

Well now; Presentation of Galatians 6:10 as argument on standpoint you like to highlight with tendency to justify JW passivity about other social, religious, etc. groups falls down with more important moral lesson, given not by Paul, but by Jesus himself. Please, let me remind all of us here, on:  

29 But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?

30 In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32 So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii[c] and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

36 “Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

37 The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

 

30 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

let us work what is good toward all, but especially toward those related to [us] in the faith.”

What’s wrong with that?

Jesus answered on your question what is wrong with that.

You don't need stupid boy like me to answer on your questions :)))     

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16 minutes ago, Srecko Sostar said:

Dear Tom, you over reacted, i expected more balanced understanding of my quote,

I didn’t overreact even a little bit. The person making accusations always pleads for more “balance” when his accusations are rejected.

There is nothing wrong with writing Russia with regard to the primary cause and not writing Russia with regard to every other cause.

 

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@Srecko Sostar We are passive. And we don't get any love letters from anyone I suppose, tends to be the complete opposite, other times just total disruption that results in a congregation meeting to temporarily be suspended for a short time or for the day. Yes we do send letters to people who are not one of Jehovah's Witnesses, an example would be greeting someone as well as doing so to preach the good news, othertimes letters to comfort someone. 

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5 hours ago, Equivocation said:

@Srecko Sostar We are passive. And we don't get any love letters from anyone I suppose, tends to be the complete opposite, other times just total disruption that results in a congregation meeting to temporarily be suspended for a short time or for the day. Yes we do send letters to people who are not one of Jehovah's Witnesses, an example would be greeting someone as well as doing so to preach the good news, othertimes letters to comfort someone. 

..... publishing time service recorded on monthly report... i guess.

I am talking about other reasons that should motivate you and other JW member in writing letters to governmental structures in behalf of suppressed individuals or groups that are not JW members.

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11 hours ago, Equivocation said:

Yes we do send letters to people who are not one of Jehovah's Witnesses, an example would be greeting someone as well as doing so to preach the good news, othertimes letters to comfort someone. 

If I come across someone in the ministry, church person or not, who does some kind of good works - say, running a soup kitchen, I do nothing but say good things about it. It is undeniably a good work, and we are not doing it.

I don’t say anything about painting the Titanic. I don’t say anything about Jesus instructing his disciples to put first the kingdom proclaiming work. I’ll get to those things, but only later. It is a matter of prioritizing and of building connections with the one I am speaking with.

Would he advise helping people, @Srecko Sostar? The side he has chosen doesn’t even know how to do it. In the US, there are two political parties. Both say they want to help people. Neither says that they want to hurt them. Yet they incessantly squabble and between them nothing gets done. 

Google the one about the Red Cross raising half a billion dollars in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake and then squandering almost all of it:

    Hello guest!

How is that world he has chosen doing in its goal to fight injustice and suffering? Does he almost have it snuffed out?

Jehovah’s Witnesses direct their blows where they will do the most good - publicizing what is the permanent solution. He shouldn’t go patronizing them as though he’s found a better way. If anthing, his is the course that comes up short. Our people are not so naive as to think that human rulership will remedy suffering and injustice. If anything, it is the cause of it.

Paul says it. You do good towards all & especially those related to you in the faith.

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On 3/5/2019 at 3:17 AM, Srecko Sostar said:

..... publishing time service recorded on monthly report... i guess.

I am talking about other reasons that should motivate you and other JW member in writing letters to governmental structures in behalf of suppressed individuals or groups that are not JW members.

Did you not read what I said, Frida?

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11 hours ago, Equivocation said:

Did you not read what I said, Frida?

Please behave yourself !! My name is Srecko Sostar. If you not change your arrogance and stop calling me with name/s that is/are not mine i will report you to people who run this forum! OK?

Perhaps larger font and different color helps more ....)))) 

Please behave yourself !! My name is Srecko Sostar. If you not change your arrogance and stop calling me with name/s that is/are not mine i will report you to people who run this forum! OK?

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      Illustrative photo

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      On the morning of 5 March, the District Court in the northern Crimean town of Dzhankoi is expected to issue its verdict in the "extremism"-related criminal case of another Crimean Jehovah's Witness, Sergei Filatov. Closed hearings on 25 and 28 February heard the final speeches in the case. The prosecutor has demanded a strict regime jail term of seven years (see below).

      If either Gerasimov or Filatov is convicted, they would be the first Jehovah's Witnesses convicted in Russian-occupied Crimea to punish them for exercising freedom of religion or belief (see below).

      Two other Jehovah's Witnesses in Russian-occupied Crimea face "extremism"-related criminal charges. Russian security forces again raided the home of one of them on 13 February. An FSB security service present during the raid put the phone down as soon as Forum 18 asked why it had been launched (see below).

      Meanwhile, the FSB security service Investigator has three times refused to grant permission for Oleg Prikhodko to receive a pastoral visit in Simferopol Investigation Prison from Archbishop Kliment, of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine. The Investigator initially refused because the Church does not have Russian registration. His third refusal claimed such a pastoral visit might harm the investigation (see below).
       
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    • By Isabella
      WASHINGTON (RNS) — Russia’s human rights record, including its history of mistreating religious minorities, is worsening, according to testimony at a hearing on Capitol Hill Thursday (Feb. 27).  
      “Unfortunately, the human rights situation in Russia continues to deteriorate, and just when you think things can’t get any worse, they do,” said Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., co-chair of the Tom Lantos Commission on Human Rights, at the hearing in the Rayburn House Office Building.
      Elizabeth Cassidy, director of research and policy at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, said Russia’s “malign activities around the globe are clearly evident, yet its systematic, ongoing, egregious repression of religious freedom is less well known.”
      “The Russian government maintains, frequently updates and enforces an array of laws that restrict religious freedom,” Cassidy added.  
      She said Jehovah’s Witnesses, who were banned as “extremist” by the Russian government in 2017, are “among the groups most brutally targeted under these laws in recent years,” as praying, preaching and dissemination of materials outside designated places of worship are often prohibited.
      As of the day of the hearing, the Jehovah’s Witnesses report that 35 of their members are in prison, 25 are under house arrest and 29 have been convicted in Russia.
      “These violations are escalating, spreading through the country and even across its borders,” Cassidy said.

      Rep. Chris Smith, R-N.J., left, co-chair of the Tom Lantos Commission on Human Rights, talks with Elizabeth Cassidy, center, and Melissa Hooper after a human rights hearing Feb. 27, 2020, at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. Banks

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    • By Isabella
      On February 21, 2020, in the Republic of Belarus, police officers detained Russian citizen Nikolay Makhalichev, 36. Checking his documents, they declared he was wanted by the Russian authorities since he was professing a banned religion. Three days later the prosecutor sent him to pre-trial detention facility SIZO-2 in Vitebsk, Belarus.

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    • By Isabella
      Authorities in Russia’s Far East have charged eight Jehovah’s Witnesses with extremism earlier this month, bringing the number of worshippers facing criminal prosecution there to 22, the religious organization said Tuesday.
      Birobidzhan, a city in the Jewish autonomous district, was among a handful of cities to label the Jehovah’s Witnesses as an “extremist” group in 2016. A year later, Russia’s Supreme Court declared the religious group to be “extremist” and banned its estimated 400 branches across the country.
       

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    • By Isabella
      On February 6, 2020, in Orenburg, officers of Penal Colony No. 1 beat believers Budenchuk, German, Gridasov, Makhammadiyev, and Miretskiy with clubs and legs. As a result, one of them, Feliks Makhammadiyev, was hospitalized. The rest were falsely charged and sent to a punishment cell.
      Believers were beaten upon admission to a penal colony located in the Krymsky lane, Orenburg. The next day, the doctors examined them. Only after Feliks Makhammadiyev wrote a document stating that he had “hit himself in the toilet” was an ambulance called in. He was hospitalized, underwent surgery, and a drainage tube was inserted into his lung to drain the fluid. Among other things, the tests showed that Makhammadiyev’s body was starving (he suffers from gluten intolerance, and the colony’s staff members had taken away his prescribed special food). The remaining believers were sent to a punishment cell on false accusations, for example, “for smoking in the wrong place.” (Jehovah's Witnesses do not smoke for religious reasons.)

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    • By Isabella
      Late in the evening of February 10, 2020, Vadim Kutsenko, 31, was tortured in the forest, leaving him in pain and weakness. Law enforcement officers repeatedly beat and choked him and applied electric shocks to his stomach and leg.
      They demanded that he give them information about other Jehovah’s Witnesses. When the officers realized that Vadim Kutsenko would not divulge any information, they took him to the investigator’s office for further interrogation. He remains in custody. On February 15, 2020, the Ingodskiy District Court will determine what, if any, restrictions they will impose on him.
      The condition of other detained Jehovah’s Witnesses, Sergey Kirilyuk, and Pavel Mamalimov, is unknown.
      The Trans-Baikal Territory is the territory where during the Stalinist repressions Jehovah's Witnesses were massively exiled to a special settlement. Believers were later rehabilitated and recognized as victims of political repression.
      A year ago, on February 15, 2019, seven peaceful Jehovah's Witnesses in Surgut were tortured with electric shocks, suffocation, and beatings. Under torture, investigators forced them to answer questions about their religion and fellow believers. According to the messages of believers, an investigation is under way.

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    • By Isabella
      MOSCOW, February 11 (RAPSI) – Investigative authorities of Russia’s Zabaikalsky Krai region in Siberia have initiated a criminal case over activities of a chapter of banned Jehovah’s Witnesses, according to a statement of Russia’s Investigative Committee.
      Investigators believe that a local chapter of Jehovah’s Witnesses has been operating in the town of Chita and several districts of the Zabaikalsky Krai for some years; the case was opened on the grounds that this religious society had been banned by a court decision as an extremist organization.
      In April 2017, the Supreme Court of Russia ordered liquidation of the Jehovah's Witnesses managing organization and all its 395 local branches. In August, the Administrative Centre of Jehovah's Witnesses was added to the list of banned extremist organizations.
      Jehovah’s Witnesses religious organization has had many legal problems in Russia. Since 2009, 95 materials distributed by the organization in the country have been declared extremist and 8 Jehovah's Witnesses’ branches have been liquidated, according to the Justice Ministry.
      Jehovah's Witnesses is an international religious organization based in Brooklyn, New York. Since 2004 several branches and chapters of the organization were banned and shut down in various regions of Russia.

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