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10 Month Old Baby with a Photographic Brain!

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This baby is only ten months old. No science can explain how n when she has learnt this 😱

 

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Only the top half of the second line showed up.

I copied what showed and the bottom half was included when I pasted it, here:

" Posted by Farzana Akhlaq on Thursday, February 7, 2019 "

But the URL link from the blue text does not "go anywhere".

?????

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The video opens in my Safari browser. Maybe it is one of your settings?

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