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Vintage soda cans

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Amazing. The only one that looks perfectly familiar is the A&W Root Beer can design. I'm assuming it's one of the most recent. The Sprite and Dr Pepper seem vaguely familiar. Also, old gas stations in the midwest still used that exact 7up design on tin signs that I remember well into the 70's, but I don't think I ever saw a can quite like that.

"Pearl Harbor" guava drink sounds like a can designed before the name became infamous.

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42 minutes ago, JW Insider said:

Also, old gas stations in the midwest still used that exact 7up design on tin signs that I remember well into the 70's, but I don't think I ever saw a can quite like that.

They never take the signs down out in the backwoods. From last year:

 

59931245-BC0F-481E-87C8-80D532A334DA.jpeg

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I used to really LIKE the old tin plated, steel drink cans of yesteryear ... that you needed a "church key" that would make a triangular hole in the top of the can, and the other end would open a glass soda bottle metal pressed on top. You could always tell who tried to open the soda bottles with their teeth, as they had some missing, and others that they had left, could use to eat corn on the cob through a picket fence.

I was young, and had a blue 454 corvette convertible with  an automatic transmission, and when it was almost dark, I could drive with my right hand on the steering wheel, and with my left hand drag a steel can on the pavement, making a shower of sparks .... and the little kids would look at me ... and marvel!

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On 4/26/2019 at 9:58 PM, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

I was young, and had a blue 454 corvette convertible with  an automatic transmission, and when it was almost dark, I could drive with my right hand on the steering wheel, and with my left hand drag a steel can on the pavement, making a shower of sparks 

Is this the one you bought as the final hurrah before the system was to end but then didn’t?

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On 4/26/2019 at 9:58 PM, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

I used to really LIKE the old tin plated, steel drink cans of yesteryear ...

We would find some of those cans—the kids and me—when we hiked the Allegheny trails and got points for each pop or beer can that we found. Extra points awarded for one of these old-timers. Is the front molar I found in the Miller Lite can yours?

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1 hour ago, TrueTomHarley said:

Is this the one you bought as the final hurrah before the system was to end but then didn’t?

This was in 1976, and it was a 1971 Corvette 454 convertible, but I had been driving a Ford 250 pickup truck with a slide in large Camper in the bed, and as I told the Brothers at the Kingdom Hall, I really needed a good Service Vehicle .... so I traded the pickup truck and camper (which had a small sailboat upside down on the roof) in on the Corvette.

I would pull up to the KIngdom Hall ( .. Roanoke, Virginia) and the Sisters would swoon and wave both arms at me, and hollar "I LOVE YOU!", which was interesting, but it was not a 1975 consolation prize.

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1 hour ago, TrueTomHarley said:

We would find some of those cans—the kids and me—when we hiked the Allegheny trails and got points for each pop or beer can that we found. Extra points awarded for one of these old-timers. Is the front molar I found in the Miller Lite can yours?

No ... at that time I used to drink Miller High Life, the Champagne of bottled beers, and when I could get it Hamm's Beer, in 2-1/2 gallon mini-kegs.  I would find out about a Witness Party ... er... gathering in another city, and show up uninvited and knock on the door with one hand, and with the other hand, holding the keg on the other  shoulder.

They would look at me ... and look at the keg ... and look at me ... and look at the keg ... and I was always enthusiastically welcomed. in.

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4 minutes ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

No ... at that time I used to drink Miller High Life, the Champagne of bottled beers

“We made Miller the number 2 most popular brand in the country and everybody said ‘Nobody will drink that stuff.’” - Mickey Spillane

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