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"A (cigarette) pack a day keeps lung cancer away"

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"A pack a day keeps lung cancer away" quoted Dr Ian McDonald prominent cancer surgeon. Dr Henry Garland said it was a "harmless pastime". Both men were enlisted by the FDA to do tests on Laetrile (B17) stating "No satisfactory evidence has been produced to indicate any significant cytotoxic effect of Laetrile on the cancer cell". Dr Ian McDonald died when his cigarette set his bed on fire, Dr Garland died of lung cancer.

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"They" say the same thing about "gun control", which in my mind is being able to hit what you shoot at .... but I digress.

Of those who want all guns banned, a good compromise solution can be made ... HALF of the total problem .... can be solved by banning guns for all Democrats.

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