Jump to content

TheWorldNewsOrg

This is the nearest galaxy, Andromeda.It is headed toward our Milky Way galaxy at 110 km per second...

Topic Summary

Created

Last Reply

Replies

Views

TheWorldNewsOrg -
TrueTomHarley -
7
137

Top Posters


Recommended Posts


Woaw !  and I am going to be out-of-town that epoch ....

... actually, the "collision" will for the most part be one galaxy passing through another., and deforming both into new shapes by the gravitational pull, as it happens.

There is a LOT of space, in Space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

... actually, the "collision" will for the most part be one galaxy passing through another., and deforming both into new shapes by the gravitational pull, as it happens.

The perfect time to look for another inhabitable planet, jump off and take a ride to, you know, expand our horizons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JW Insider said:

The perfect time to look for another inhabitable planet, jump off and take a ride to, you know, expand our horizons.

Or, just drop over into another Multiverse, in the extremely rare case that two solar systems collide, and disrupt the systems'  planetary orbits. The advantage is that it can be done with ones' transporter belt, and the 'quivalent of a 9 volt transistor radio battery.

uh ... assuming, of course that you HAVE a transporter belt ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Jesus.defender
      In 1889, the WT said " we present PROOFS that the setting up of the kingdom of God has already begun...and that 'the battle of the great day of God almighty' (Revelation16:14),which will end in AD1914 with the complete overthrow of the earth's present rulership, is already commenced.".
      The watchtower presented "proofs".
      These "proofs" were wrong, so what credibility do they have to "proclaim" anything?
       
    • By Jack Ryan
      The trio of 'signs' have all emerged in the past few months
      Three unusual happenings have sparked claims that Biblical prophecies about the end of the world and the coming of the Messiah may be coming true. 
      The first occurrence was the birth of the first 'red heifer in 2,000 years' in Israel - a creature that features in 'end of times' tales in both Christianity and Judaism.
      The news of the birth, which emerged in September, was followed by claims last month that fish and other forms of life are quickly filling up Dead Sea sinkholes. 
      Hebrew prophet EzekielÂ’s end-of-days prophecy foresees the sea - a hypersaline environment, with a reported 37 per cent salinity - flourishing into life.
      And a photojournalist with the Dead Sea Revival Project said that coming to the body of water, "the lowest point on earth, you see prophecy coming true".
      The first occurrence was the birth of the first 'red heifer in 2,000 years' in Israel Fish have reportedly been spotted in Dead Sea sinkholes The third strange occurrence took place this week, when a snake was filmed slithering out of Israel's Western Wall, unexpectedly interrupting prayers.
      Footage showed the reptile scaring away a pigeon - with some Internet users deeming it a sign that a prophecy about the Messiah's coming will soon be fulfilled. 
      While countless 'end of the world' conspiracy theories have fallen flat over the decades, some claim that the beginning of the 'end' will actually begin in 2021. 
      The trio of 'signs' have all emerged in the past few months.
      Below are the happenings that have sparked prophecy fulfilment claims
      Click to play
      Snake emerges from Western Wall cracks fulfilling Bible prophecy and signaling 'end of days' Birth of 'first red heifer in 2000 years' 
      Two months ago, it emerged that a 'red heifer' had been born in Israel. 
      The Temple Institute announced the birth via YouTube, and said the calf and her mother would undergo "extensive examination" to determine if she's "blemish free".
      It said the red calf "brings the promise of reinstating Biblical purity to the world".
      Red heifers feature in "end of times" tales, with the birth and sacrifice of the red cow said to precede the construction of the Third Temple in Jerusalem.
      In mainstream Orthodox Judaism, the rebuilding of the Temple will happen before the coming of the Jewish Messiah. The two previous temples have been destroyed.
      The Temple Institute announced the birth of the red calf via YouTube Rabbinical experts reportedly confirmed the calf is a “viable candidate for the Biblical red heifer” The Temple Institute and other organisations have been established with the goal of building the Third Temple on Mount Moriah or the Temple Mount.
      However, some theologians believe the construction of the Third Temple is linked to 'Judgement Day' or the 'end of times'.
      After “extensive examination" of the calf, rabbinical experts are said to have confirmed she is a “viable candidate for the Biblical red heifer”.
      Breaking Israel News reported a board of rabbis verified she fulfilled the requirements of the prophecy - which says the cow must be red "without blemish". 
      A board of rabbis verified the creature fulfilled the requirements of the prophecy Fish spotted in the Dead Sea
      It is said that the Dead Sea's high salinity prevents fish from living in it. 
      However, marine life has reportedly been spotted in the sea's sinkholes. 
      Scientists are said to have been shocked to discover the sinkholes rapidly filling up with fish and other forms of life that never used to be sighted. 
      Israeli photojournalist Noam Bedein said the body of water is "anything but dead", telling Breaking Israel News that it is the “eighth wonder of the world.”
      Scientists are said to have been shocked to discover Dead Sea sinkholes rapidly filling up with fish and other forms of life Old Testament prophet Ezekiel foresaw the Dead Sea flourishing into life in his end of times prophecy He has reportedly seen fish in the sinkholes - and witnessed growing vegetation.
      Ezekiel, a priest and prophet who appears in the Old Testament, foresaw the Dead Sea flourishing into life in his end-of-times prophecy. 
      According to Ezekiel 47: 8-9, "there shall be a very great multitude of fish".
      And Mr Bedein said: "A place that was once cursed in Biblical times, now you can come here to the Dead Sea, explore the sinkholes and see fish where the water has receded – fulfilling prophecies from Ezekiel who talked about the land flourishing and blooming when the Jews return."
      Snake wriggles out of the Western Wall
      A snake was spotted crawling out of the stones of Israel's Western Wall on Wednesday night, causing some "panic" among worshippers.
      The Western Wall Heritage Foundation released video footage of the reptile emerging from one of Judaism's holiest sites, the Times of Israel reports. 
      During the incident, the snake reportedly scared away a pigeon - which some bloggers have claimed is a symbol that we are living in "dangerous times". 
      They say these times lead up to the coming of the Messiah.
      A snake was spotted crawling out of the stones of Israel's Western Wall on Wednesday night Video footage has emerged of the incident at one of Judaism's holiest sites Some Internet users have also drawn connections to the serpent that tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, according to the Bible. 
      According to Ynet news site, the snake that slithered out of the wall's stones was likely trying to fatten itself up for the winter months.
      The incident came just months after a 220-pound boulder dislodged and fell from the Western Wall, nearly crushing a female worshipper below.
      https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/three-signs-biblical-prophecies-end-13526987
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Short answer — no.
      But David Meade, a Christian and self-published author of end-of-the-world survival guides, predicts doomsday is near — very near, as in this Saturday.
      Meade’s ideology, laid out in his book “Planet X — The 2017 Arrival,” is described by the author as “a compendium of information from every sphere—astronomical, scientific, the Book of Revelation and geopolitics.” There’s some astrology in there, too.
      Meade is the latest in a very long line of American self-proclaimed prophets who claim they know when — sometimes to the hour — the biblically predicted “end times” will arrive. And while it’s fun to laugh at his belief that the “Planet Nibiru” will collide with the Earth this week, the failed prophesies of some of his predecessors have, at times, led to important religious movements or illuminating ways of thinking about faith. Let us explain: 
      How common are predictions the end is at hand?
      Very common. Wikipedia lists over 170 different religiously motivated predictions of the end of the world. The first recorded one dates back to the year 66 and ancient Judea. Since then, doomsday predictions have jumped continents, cultures and religions, but they do seem to be a mostly Protestant pastime. The first American-born doomsday dude was Cotton Mather. This son of Puritans, teenage Harvard graduate and popular New England preacher publicly proclaimed the world would end three different times, in 1697, 1716 and 1736.
      If their predictions were wrong, why remember them?
      Because some of the people or groups who made these failed predictions led to other important things in American religious history. Consider the Millerites, a band of 19th-century Americans who left their fields unplanted and sold their worldly goods in anticipation of their expiration date — Oct. 22, 1844. After their “Great Disappointment,” they  eventually became the Seventh-day Adventists. (Fun fact: The Millerites inspired HBO’s “The Leftovers” and even made an appearance in a couple of episodes.)
      Then there were the followers of Charles Taze Russell, a 19th-century preacher who looked for Jesus’ return and the resurrection of the dead (Christians only, please) in 1878 (and again in 1914). They became Jehovah’s Witnesses, who now ring doorbells around the world (and are persecuted for it in some places — looking at you, Russia). Even John Wesley, co-founder of Methodism, dabbled in predictions, once writing that Jesus would return between 1058 and 1836 (rather a large spread as predictions go).
      Some failed predictions bring unexpected insights into religion. In 1955, most people laughed when Dorothy Martin, a Chicago housewife, said aliens from Planet Clarion informed her the world would end for all but her and her small band of followers, who would be “lifted up.” No end, no lift. But social psychologist Leon Festinger developed his “theory of cognitive dissonance” from his firsthand study of Martin, and he went on to write a 1957 book that explained how rational people come to believe irrational things that is still used to explain everything from religious beliefs to real estate bubbles.
      And to flat-out ignore some predictions can be perilous. Florence Houteff, considered a prophetess by the Branch Davidians, predicted April 22, 1959, as the rollout date of the Book of Revelation’s fire and brimstone. Wrong, and her group splintered in the aftermath.
      One of the splinters wound up in a compound in Waco, Texas, surrounded by federal agents demanding their surrender on firearms charges. Their leader, David Koresh, was another self-proclaimed prophet who made doomsday predictions involving the deaths of his followers. Some critics felt the federal agents failed to fully understand Koresh as a religious leader, seeing him only as a con man and criminal. By the end of a 51-day siege, after a battery of gunshots and a fast-moving fire, 86 people were killed, including Koresh and several children.
      Why this prediction now? Wasn’t there another big “apocalypse now” prediction a few years ago?
      Scholars say doomsday predictions cluster around certain events — the Great Plague of the Middle Ages, or the “harmonic convergence” of the planets, or the year 2000. Meade has pointed to last month’s solar eclipse as a “sign” of what he says is to come.
      And yes, there has been a long string of predictions in the last two decades. Who can forget Harold Camping, the Christian radio media mogul who picked two dates in 2011, hit the airwaves, put up billboards, solicited money — and nada. He joined some rather famous names — Edgar Cayce, Sun Myung Moon, Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson (at least twice, but before he had access to the White House) and John Hagee among them — of failed futurists. Heck, Sir Isaac Newton himself, great astronomer and mathematician, bet that Jesus would return in the year 2000.
      Even the man who explained gravity was wrong. So relax. Make some weekend plans. See you Monday.
      http://www.9news.com/ext/news/nation-now/will-the-world-end-on-saturday/73/nationnow/7vXEKvfHbiam2mUMC2O8MQ
  • Forum Statistics

    61,683
    Total Topics
    114,545
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    16,510
    Total Members
    1,592
    Most Online
    Rosjes128
    Newest Member
    Rosjes128
    Joined




  • Topics

  • Posts

    • True, however, testing the spirit does not include drawing one's own conclusions outside scripture. I have not found an insistence where the Watchtower has gone beyond what is written. Do they try to simplify certain things, yes they do. That doesn’t mean they are stepping away from the context. Another thing is with the comparison made. The GB are following the true spirit of God like the apostles. Therefore, they have NOT taken the position of the Jerusalem counsel. If you have, then you sit in Moses seat. Matthew 23:2 If the passion is to correct, as God corrected his people, Then I would suspect there is a resemblance to be equal to Christ as the Pope seems to indicate. The GB do not hold themselves in that high regard as to think, they can question God's motives for humanity. I would recommend studying the issue further. There are areas that haven’t been included with many presentations here. Since you claim the Watchtower is misrepresenting an issue that has become an obstacle to your personal faith, then I would make light of JTR and TTH comments about contacting the Watchtower directly. Feeding an assumption only emboldens the God of this world, no one else. Correct. There is only one way to view scripture. Anyone deviating from that is causing personal harm to the spirit of others. It doesn’t matter if those individuals hate the Watchtower, it’s by their own spoken words and actions of clear and concise misinterpretation of scripture, and misapplication of the Watchtower literature where they fail to see the difference. Removing themselves from the context of scripture to argue with the strength of hate and discourse is the sole definition of scripture when Christ clearly stated not to and to stay away from. Those are the dangers when we engage in an open forum. We like to think it is to discuss issues. However, the ever present danger will always be, the influence of the devil. It is one thing to defend the truth, but quite another thing to defend the truth when one’s heart is conflicted. Merely following that conduct disqualifies anyone from stating they are Christian. That is the kind of Christian Jesus spoke of as a danger. The confusion would lie with how the public perceives the Watchtower under the direction of the bible Student association. The word “association” should give anyone, pause to rethink, Russell and Rutherford belonged to the International Bible Student Association. A reason, Rutherford dismissed the edger pyramid scheme straight up. Russell, used it as a comparison, nothing more. Another thing that witnesses should consider, those works were made by not allowing Christendom’s view of scripture. Therefore, Russell essentially started from scratch. There are far more reasons why those dates were accepted. Mainly, by events of that time. Bible Students still believe, the Jewish nation has a pivotal role in the last days. According to Christ everyone became relative in the last days including the Jews. They are not the sole reason for the last days as Christendom exerts. Remember, even the most conservative view which is Bishop Ussher, his calculation referenced 586BC as the 3rd instance of judgment by Nebuchadnezzar. The third, not the first nor the second as historians and scholars claim, but the third. This is why history itself is flawed, since they continue to insist, there were only 2 campaigns against Judea and Jerusalem. Mainly 597-587BC. I will not beat on the bush with this one. I am confident we both know what limitations are imposed and previous actions taken.  
    • An interesting take with a lot to say for it. When Jude mentions these "rocks beneath the surface" for example, it always reminds me of the first time I read "Paul and Thecla" while at Bethel, but at the NYPL, via a book about Christian widows of the 2nd century. Paul and Thecla is an early Christian short story or novella with Thecla, not Paul, as the hero. It's one of a few stories of this type, probably written by and for women in the early Christian congregations. The antagonists of some of these stories are the 2nd century "circuit overseers" who would go from congregation to congregation saying all the right things from the "platform" but then they would also quietly worm their way into the houses of well-meaning sisters and widows, and try to take advantage of them sexually. I was quite surprised when the Watchtower last year mentioned Paul and Thecla for the second time in nearly 100 years, and was again surprisingly supportive of the work as containing possible reflections of true traditions believed in the 2nd century: *** w18 March p. 13 par. 3 Questions From Readers *** The Acts of Paul and Thecla was highly regarded in early centuries, as confirmed by the fact that 80 Greek manuscripts of it exist, as well as versions in other languages. Thus, our artistic presentations are in line with some ancient indications of what the apostle looked like. I personally have never experienced a "bad" circuit overseer. All of them have been exemplary and I have always looked forward to their visits, especially when hearing a new one for the first time. But I think all of us old-timers have had experience with congregational drifters, and we often look at them with the same kinds of suspicions. Sometimes it's a young brother who is very vague about his last congregation and who quickly latches on to an association with another eligible sister. Sometimes it's a more elderly brother, perhaps even a special pioneer, looking for an alternate congregation, hoping the trouble he caused in the last congregation won't get reported in too much detail. (Speaking from a real example, this elderly brother also latched onto a "relationship," and place to stay, with a family of sisters: a sister with an unbelieving and ailing husband, and a couple of daughters. It was a recipe for disaster.) The younger brother caused some heart-ache by getting engaged to a sister, and the engagement was later broken off.  It's hard for me not to imagine such cases when I read Jude. So, at first, it was hard for me to see them as drifters into forums like this one to cause other kinds of trouble, but I can definitely see a similarity now.  
    • I’m not really sure what “worshipful” means.  When celebrities come into town, they are mobbed by fans. Are those fans worshipful? I might say yes, but the fans themselves will just say they they are flocking to them out of respect for their accomplishments. If brothers pose for selfies with the GB members (much to the latter’s annoyance, I am consistently told, someone said with the possible exception of Lett) are they “worshipful?” It’s in the eye of the beholder, I think. Though I have a great many faults, admiring personalities is not one of them. I would love to have a GB member stay at my house so I could ignore him. “There’s your room—make yourself at home. If you’d like to visit, that works fine, but you have many things to do and if you ignore us completely that also works fine with us,”  Probably there are few words they could hear that would please them more. And no, @James Thomas Rook Jr., I wouldn’t present them with a list of my QUESTIONS that, as MEN of HONOR, they are obligated to answer,
    • Just for interest, here is an interview with prince Andrew. It's acutely embarrassing the excuses  he makes and the denials.... Read comments, they are entertaining  
  • Popular Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.