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Jehovah’s Witness sexual abuse report can stay online, judge rules


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August 5th 2020  Old news revisited, but this must be costing the CCJW a bit of money. 

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A report into the handling of sexual abuse among Jehovah’s Witnesses does not have be removed from a government site, a court in Arnhem has decided. It is the second time the Dutch branch of the church has gone to court over the report. In January it tried to stop publication but at the time judges ruled it should be published in the public interest.

Just 25% of victims said they were satisfied at the way their complaints against the community had been handled and only 27% of cases were ever passed on to the police or other officials. Most of the reports related to abuse in the past, with just 32 covering the past 10 years.





 

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August 5th 2020  Old news revisited, but this must be costing the CCJW a bit of money.  Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. A report into the handling of sexual abuse among Jehovah’s Witnesses does not have be removed from a government site, a court in Arnhem has decided. It is the second time the Dutch branch of the church has gone to court over the report. In January it tried to stop publication but at the time judges ruled it should be publ

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       Rather than challenge their authority, we truly appreciate our hardworking elders!  W02/8/1 pp 9-14”
       With representation of God’s priests, comes apparent authority.  It is interesting that God would bless this non-biblical position, since nowhere in the Bible does scripture say God would allow His priests to be represented or replaced.
      But then, do JWs care what God thinks?  I wonder.
      “The Lord said to Aaron, “You, your sons and your family are to bear the responsibility for offenses connected with the sanctuary, and you and your sons alone are to bear the responsibility for offenses connected with the priesthood.
      You are to be responsible for the care of the sanctuary and the altar, so that my wrath will not fall on the Israelites again. 6 I myself have selected your fellow Levites from among the Israelites as a gift to you, dedicated to the Lord to do the work at the tent of meeting. 7 But only you and your sons may serve as priests in connection with everything at the altar and inside the curtain. I am giving you the service of the priesthood as a gift. Anyone else who comes near the sanctuary is to be put to death.”  Num 18:1,5-7
      Since the anointed are the sanctuary Temple/House of God, the GB has allowed others  (“Gentiles”) to come “near the sanctuary”, and act as God’s priests.  Elders “sit” – rule with authority – over/in,  the Temple of God.  2 Thess 2:3,4; 1 Cor 3:16,17; 1 Pet 2:5,9; Eph 2:20-22; Rev 13:5-7
      The Lord said to Moses, 6 “Bring the tribe of Levi and present them to Aaron the priest to assist him. 7 They are to perform duties for him and for the whole community at the tent of meeting by doing the work of the tabernacle. 
      “Appoint Aaron and his sons to serve as priests; anyone else who approaches the sanctuary is to be put to death.” Num 3:6,10
       
      Will Queensland challenge the authority of the elder body? Should we let Queensland know who are the acting priests of the WT?
      Will the elder body back down and refuse to be called “priests” when they are confronted by their actions of not reporting child abuse, and the promise of jail time looms before them?  Or, for “Jehovah’s organization” will they do their time in jail, instead of obeying the laws? 
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      “His armed forces will rise up to desecrate the temple fortress and will abolish the daily sacrifice. Then they will set up the abomination that causes desolation. 32 With flattery he will corrupt those who have violated the covenant, but the people who know their God will firmly resist him.” Dan 11:31,32
       
         
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      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. . Earlier this year, Brisbane Catholic Archbishop Mark Coleridge told the ABC he believed breaking the confessional seal would "not make a difference to the safety of young people".
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      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. . The passing of the law also coincides with Queensland child protection week.

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    • By Srecko Sostar
      part of text:
      Collaboration between Church and state
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    • By Witness
      Grand jury investigators are ‘dead serious’ about revealing sexual abuse cover-ups among Jehovah’s Witnesses
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. , Updated: February 14, 2020- 5:00 AM           TIM TAI / FILE PHOTOGRAPH Brian Chase listened carefully from his Tucson, Ariz., home last July as an investigator from the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office introduced himself over the phone.
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      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  last year that focused on O’Donnell’s efforts, and a recent Oxygen documentary, Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  which highlights ongoing reporting from Trey Bundy, a reporter at Reveal, from The Center for Investigative Reporting. For years, many ex-Witnesses had little choice but to grapple with their trauma silently. Survivors eventually began forming communities on social media — Reddit, YouTube, Facebook — and hoped that the religion’s leaders would be held accountable, either in a news story or a courtroom, for enabling abusers.
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    • By Witness
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    • By 4Jah2me
      Jehovah’s Witnesses go to court to block sex abuse report publication

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    • By Shiwiii
      Why does it take the Inquisition into the CSA by governments around the world, lawsuits in many countries and  the threat of non-profit status in a few countries to FORCE the wt/gb to amend the CSA policy?  The article is in the May 2019 WT and the title of the article is "Love and Justice in the Face of Wickedness". 
       
       
      "13 Do elders comply with secular laws about reporting an allegation of child abuse to the secular authorities? Yes. In places where such laws exist, elders endeavor to comply with secular laws about reporting allegations of abuse....So when they learn of an allegation, elders immediately seek direction on how they can comply with laws about reporting it."
       
      I can see that they still won't enforce reporting to the police each and every CSA case only if required by law.  Key word is "REQUIRED" .
       
      "14 Elders assure victims and their parents and others with knowledge of the  matter that they are free to report an allegation of abuse to the secular authorities. But what if the report is about someone who is a part of the congregation and the matter then becomes known in the community? Should the Christian who reported it feel that he has brought reproach on God’s name? No. The abuser is the one who brings reproach on God’s name."
       
      Finally, they finally get it that it is the wrong doer who is the bad guy and not the reporter.......but, I'm sure this is just lip service. And here's why:
       
       
      16 When they learn that someone in the congregation is accused of child abuse, elders endeavor to comply with any secular laws about reporting the matter, and then they conduct a Scriptural investigation. If the individual denies the accusation, the elders consider the testimony of witnesses. If at least two people—the one making the accusation and someone else who can verify this act or other acts of child abuse by the accused—establish the charge, a judicial committee is formed. 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  
      And there you have it, two witness rule still in effect and no mandatory reporting of CSA unless mandated by law.
      However, what is the true gain here? Not much, but some is better than nothing, the fact that whoever reports is not the bad guy, the abuser is.  What a wonderful provision made by the loving Jehoverning body. I hope that one day the gb/wt will be on par with humanity in reporting ALL accusations of CSA or any abuse for that matter. 




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