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"I ain't never had my nose done!" Prince announced at a March 2004 concert, while Jackson was on trial. Some in the crowd took it as a shot at Jackson, who was later found not guilty of the criminal accusations.


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    • Guest Indiana
      By Guest Indiana
      While Prince was not necessarily a political artist, he often talked about race, poverty and faith in his music. He was not associated with a particular political party, and he was also open about never voting.
      “Well, I don’t vote,” Prince famously told Tavis Smiley while discussing  Barack Obama in 2009. “I’ve don’t have nothing to do with it. I’ve got no dog in that race.”
      Prince cited his faith for not participating in any elections.
      “The reason why is that I’m one of the Jehovah’s Witnesses and we’ve never voted,” he continued. “That’s not to say I don’t think … President Obama is a very smart individual and he seems like he means well. Prophecy is what we all have to go by now.”
      https://newsone.com/3889647/prince-estate-trump-rally-music/
    • By LNN
      I never meant to cause you any sorrow
      I never meant to cause you any pain
      I only wanted to one time to see you laughing
      I only wanted to see you Laughing in the purple rain
       
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
       
      I only wanted to see you Bathing in the purple rain
      I never wanted to be your weekend lover
      I only wanted to be some kind of friend
      Baby, I could never steal you from another
      It's such a shame our friendship had to end
       
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
       
      I only wanted to see you Underneath the purple rain
      Honey, I know, I know I know times are changing
      It's time we all reach out For something new, that means you too
      You say you want a leader
      But you can't seem to make up your mind
      I think you better close it And let me guide you to the purple rain
       
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
       
      If you know what I'm singing about up here C'mon, raise your hand
       
      Purple rain, purple rain
       
      I only want to see you
      Only want to see you In the purple rain
    • By The Librarian
      “Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
      Purple rain, purple rain
      I only wanted to see you
      Underneath the purple rain” (Prince) ➖➖
      #jw #tj #jwbrasil #jwfriends #jwonly #jworg #jehovah #jwfamily #bestlifeever #jehovahswitnesses #jwbrazil #jwmexico #jehova #jehovahswitness #jwlove #jwsisters #jwlife #jehovahscreation #jwphotography #jw_photographers #jwphoto #jwphotographer #jwcreation #jwnature #jw_snapshots #ig_mexico #mexico_maravilloso #vive_mexico #loves_mexico #passionxmexico ➖➖
      View the full article
    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      Sony’s Michael Jackson Bet Gets Complicated
      Michael Jackson had been one of Sony Music Entertainment’s brightest stars before his 2009 death. And the seven-year, $250 million deal it struck with Jackson’s estate in 2018 to continue distributing his recordings was one of the biggest the industry had seen in some time.
      But now, following the HBO documentary Leaving Neverland, Sony’s Jackson bet is looking like a risky play, the WSJ reports.
      The two-part film (which was the third-largest premiere of any HBO doc in a decade) details the claims of two men alleging Jackson sexually abused them as boys. And in the era of #MeToo and #MuteRKelly, sales, streaming, and commercial use of Jackson’s music could fall...
      Which means lost business for Sony. Several radio stations in Canada and New Zealand have stopped playing Jackson, and (believe it or not) radio is still a big moneymaker for music companies—Deloitte estimates global radio revenue will climb to $40 billion this year, with more than 85% of adults listening to radio once a week.
       
    • By LNN
      One of Mercury’s longtime idols was the King of Pop himself, Michael Jackson. Mercury had admired Jackson all the way back to his Jackson 5 days, and in 1983, barely a year after Jackson’s Thriller had become the biggest album in the world, Mercury got the chance to collaborate with Jackson. They began recording three demos that were, sadly, never completed. Asked in 1987 why things didn’t work out, Mercury evasively blamed the fact that the two stars were never being in the same country long enough and commented that Jackson had “retreated into his own little world.” Another story emerged wherein Jackson had allegedly picked a fight with Mercury after catching him using substances during the recording session. A third explanation, from Queen manager Jim Beach, stated that Jackson brought his pet llama into the studio, which astonished and frustrated Mercury’s attempts to record. Turns out you shouldn’t ever meet your heroes.
    • Guest Indiana
      By Guest Indiana
      In the new HBO documentary Leaving Neverland, both men accuse the late singer of sexual abuse.
      On Sunday, HBO will debut its two-part documentary Leaving Neverland, featuring interviews with two of Michael Jackson's former child companions.
      The documentary focuses on James Safechuck and Wade Robson, who filed lawsuits claiming they were sexually abused as boys at the Neverland Ranch. It also follows their families, who speak at length about their entanglement with Jackson, in the aftermath of the scandal. 
      According to Slate, Safechuck and Robson both say in the film that Jackson promised them jewelry in exchange for sexual favors. The men also allege that Jackson, who died in 2009, told them they could go to jail if they spoke out.
       
      These accusations weren't new. On two other occasions, Jackson was hit with lawsuits alleging abuse. But in 2005, Jackson was acquitted of criminal molestation charges, which did not involve Robson or Safechuck. Robson testified at the trial, saying he had slept in Jackson’s room many times and nothing happened. Safechuck gave a similar statement to investigators when he was young.
      https://www.elle.com/culture/movies-tv/a26594085/michael-jackson-accusers-wade-robson-james-safechuck-lawsuit/
    • Guest Indiana
      By Guest Indiana
      Robson was only 5 years old when he met Jackson after being called up on stage at a concert in Brisbane, Australia. The boy was a fan of Jackson and impressed the crowds with his spot-on “Smooth Criminal” dance performance.
      Jackson invited Robson and his mom up to his hotel room after the concert. Nothing happened that night, but Jackson told the Robsons to get in touch if they ever came to America. In January 1990, when Wade was 7, the Robsons went to the U.S. for the first time to visit Disneyland. Wade’s mom, Janet, found the number for Jackson’s personal assistant, who said Jackson remembered Wade and invited them to his recording studio in Sherman Oaks. Jackson then invited the family to Neverland for the weekend. Wade stayed at the residence with Jackson while the rest of his family left to tour the Grand Canyon. Robson says that’s when the sexual contact began—and it continued for four years.
      Read more: https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/tv/a26588491/wade-robson-michael-jackson-leaving-neverland/


    • Guest
      By Guest
      Michael Jackson - Earth Song
      Lyrics below.
      What about sunrise What about rain What about all the things that you said We were to gain What about killing fields Is there a time What about all the things That you said were yours and mine Did you ever stop to notice All the blood we've shed before Did you ever stop to notice This crying Earth, these weeping shores Aah, ooh What have we done to the world Look what we've done What about all the peace That you pledge your only son What about flowering fields Is there a time What about all the dreams That you said was yours and mine Did you ever stop to notice All the children dead from war Did you ever stop to notice This crying earth, these weeping shores Aah, ooh Aah, ooh I used to dream I used to glance beyond the stars Now I don't know where we are Although I know we've drifted far Aah, ooh Aah, ooh Aah, ooh Aah, ooh Hey, what about yesterday? (What about us?) What about the seas? (What about us?) The heavens are falling down (What about us?) I can't even breathe (What about us) What about everything (What about us?) I didn't do? (What about us?) What about nature's worth? (Ooh) It's our planet's womb (What about us?) What about animals? (What about it?) Turned kingdoms to dust (What about us?) What about elephants? (What about us?) Have we lost their trust? (What about us?) What about crying whales (What about us?) Ravaging the seas? (What about us?) What about forest trails? (Ooh) Burnt, despite our pleas (What about us?) What about the holy land? (What about it?) Torn apart by creed? (What about us?) What about the common man? (What about us?) Can't we set him free? (What about us?) What about children dying? (What about us?) Can't you hear them cry? (What about us?) Where did we go wrong? (Ooh) Someone tell me why (What about us?) What about baby boy? (What about it?) What about the days? (What about us?) What about all their joy? (What about us?) What about the man? (What about us?) What about the crying man? (What about us?) What about Abraham? (What about us?) What about death again? (Ooh) Do we give a damn?
    • By Kurt
      Nestled into the rolling landscape of the Santa Ynez Valley, with its dramatic mountain ranges, flaxen-colored fields, and century-old live oaks, this irreplaceable estate exudes the ambience of a grand European manor while remaining an inviting, comfortable, livable oasis.
      Formerly known as Neverland Ranch, the estate consists of approximately 2,700 acres and blends effortlessly with the natural surroundings. The land borders the Los Padres National Forest, providing the property with utmost privacy and serenity as well as an inspiring uninterrupted view. Meticulous landscaping — which includes lush formal gardens with seasonally changed plantings — provides vibrant color for much of the year.

      The centerpiece of the ranch is a truly impressive 12,000-square-foot main residence, fashioned after the majestic manors that line the coast of Normandy. Tucked between two lakes and standing in the shade of towering trees, it is accessed via a stone bridge and circular motor court paved with indigenous stone.
      Splendid in its architectural planning, it features a magnificent formal living room; a handsomely proportioned dining room capable of accommodating two tables; a kitchen with distinctive Old World and copper accents as well as commercial-grade appliances; a relaxed, rustic family room with a Bouquet Canyon stone fireplace; a breakfast room with a garden and lake view; a luxurious master wing with two lavish baths and a library or study; upper-level guest suites affording consummate privacy; and a delightful recreation room.
      The interiors boast extensive use of high ceilings, indigenous stone, warm oak, patterned and exposed brick, dark lacquered beams, elegant marble, Portuguese tile, rough-hewn timber, and floor-to-ceiling and mullioned windows.
      The vistas — over patio areas and lush formal gardens toward grassy fields and mountains — create a feeling of being embraced by the land.

      A breezeway connects the main residence to the office, conference, and four-bay garage complex. Stone pathways meander through the spectacular grounds, linking the home with lakes, a meadow, and the outdoor entertaining areas —among them a barbecue and kitchen pavilion, a swimming pool with undulating French grey bottom, and a spa set amid stalwart stone boulders.
      An inviting guesthouse offers four luxuriously sized and distinctively designed guest suites, and the European-style hunting lodge features a subterranean wine cellar and overlooks the estate’s championship tennis court. A leisurely walk from the main residence is the 50-seat movie theater and dance studio.

      The property also includes multipurpose barns, a petting zoo, staff housing, an additional two-bedroom guesthouse, an administration building, and a paved helipad. All water needs are sourced through multiple private on-site wells.
      source
       
       
    • By Jack Ryan
      Prince's estate released a statement.
      At a rally in Mississippi, Trump bizarrely played Prince‘s iconic 1984 song “Purple Rain.” PrinceÂ’s estate was not here for it.
      “The Prince Estate has never given permission to President Trump or The White House to use Prince’s songs and have requested that they cease all use immediately,” Prince’s estate said in a statement via Jeremiah Freed, also known as Dr. Funkenberry.
      Here is a video below of the song being played at the Trump rally:
      While Prince was certainly a political artist, he often talked about race, poverty and faith in his music. He was not associated with a particular political party, and he was also open about never voting. In 2009, Prince told Tavis Smiley about President Barack Obama, “Well, I don’t vote. I’ve don’t have nothing to do with it. I’ve got no dog in that race.”
      He continued, “The reason why is that I’m one of the Jehovah’s Witnesses and we’ve never voted. That’s not to say I don’t think … President Obama is a very smart individual and he seems like he means well. Prophecy is what we all have to go by now.”
      https://newsone.com/3831500/princes-trump-purple-rain/
    • By TrueTomHarley
      Early tweets I saw were unusually vicious, as in "Welcome to hell, Joe"
      SOB though he was said to be, though, nobody would have heard of Michael Jackson without him. Raising eight kids in gritty Gary Indiana, where many men walk away; it is not nothing.
      One wonders whether his son would have been happier had Joe followed another course. It is one of those "which is better off, a live dog or a dead lion?" deals of Bible verse.
      I wrote something of this long ago:
      http://www.tomsheepandgoats.com/2009/07/the-pundits-michael-jackson-and-joe.html
    • By TrueTomHarley
      I beat CBS to the punch by two years in what they said about the Oxycotin pharma fraud. It is in the Prince chapter of Tom Irregardless and Me, there because Prince died a victim of that fraud. Since the Prince chapter is Chapter 1, it is even in the free preview section.   I didn’t mention the company or the drug by name. I followed the lead of Watchtower publications, which I have come to understand their reasons mostly through imitating them. You do not name a villain, for as soon as you name one, you create the impression that removing that villain will fix things. Instead, if you should succeed in taking him out, another villain immediately steps into his shoes and the play continues with barely a hiccup.   It is the play we are watching, not the heroes and villains in it. You do not have to know the names of the actors to follow the play – it can even be a distraction if you do. The names don’t matter. If one actor doesn’t show up for curtain call, they simply plug in a substitute, and the play continues.   'Tom Irregardless and Me', in the Prince chapter, quotes a Dr. Johnson, who wrote to say he was   “forced to paint an unflattering picture of the industry that I have been a part of for the last 15 years. I wish I could tell you that this epidemic was due to an honest mistake. That the science was unclear or had mixed results that only later became evident. But I can’t. I also wish I could tell you that the only reason the problem persists is a ‘lack of physician awareness.’ But I won’t. The reason this opioid problem started and the reason it continues is sadly for the most American reason there is - business.”   At one time, Dr. Johnson points out, American doctors prescribed opioids as did doctors everywhere: for pain relief from cancer or acute injury. He then tells of a drug company, introducing a new opioid product in 1996, that swung for the fences. It didn’t want to target just cancer patients. It wanted to target everyone experiencing everyday pain: joint pain and back pain, for example:   “To do this, they recruited and paid experts in the field of pain medicine to spread the message that these medicines were not as addictive as previously thought...As a physician in training, I remember being told that the risk of addiction for patients taking opioids for pain was ‘less than one percent.’ What I was not told was that there was no good science to suggest rates of addiction were really that low. That ‘less than one percent’ statistic came from a five-sentence paragraph in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1980. It has come to be known as the Porter and Jick study. However, it was not really a study. It was a letter to the editor; more like a tweet. You can read the whole thing in 90 seconds.”   The CBS story of 5 days ago reveals a former drug rep of the company who spills for them.. I had it all two years ago, and it is even more damning. I didn’t put it in the book because illuminating Prince’s JW life was the object of the chapter, not crusading against pharma.   In fact, not only was the drug far more addictive than doctors and reps were led to believe, but the pain relief it delivered only lasted a few hours, not the 12 that was advertised. Yet, when complaints of such were received, the company would not permit reps to advise patients take it more often, since that exposed the fact that the much more expensive drug was no better than what was already being used for pain. Instead, the advice was to increase the dosage, and that obviously served to intensify the addictive quality. Prince and millions like him got hooked on a drug that the doctor prescribed, and when doctors started to get squirrelly, withholding supply for fear of what they were unleashing, these ones were driven to the black market to find substitutes.   Trying to trash anything organizationally related, @James Thomas Rook Jr.threw in my face that Prince died an addicted druggie. I never truly forgave him for that, but I am ready to now, as I assume he did not know the whole story, just as ones do not know the whole story about abuse allegations.   It is here in the first chapter, Prince, which, to my knowledge, is the most complete, and perhaps only, published collection of the artist's JW experiences and interactions. And it is in the free section.   https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/686882
    • By Jack Ryan
      Sadly, they both died much too young -- Jackson on June 25, 2010, and Prince on April 21, 2016. Rest in peace.
    • By Jack Ryan
      Jackson, the King of Pop, named one of his children Prince, which only fueled speculation about his feelings toward the elder Prince.
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    • And, as I remember, the Colonists thought the British Interpretation of how things should be handled that was an onerous burden to them ... sufficient enough to go to war against the mightiest  army and navy of that time period.
    • Per Wikipedia, The Constitution says: "The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors." When the Constitution was written, the terms "high crime" and "misdemeanor" were both used in senses that are quite different from the way we've come to think of them today. The original sense came from the laws that the framers had themselves been under, the British laws, which had used the term since as far back as 1386. It was originally a phrase to highlight the fact that almost any kind of "maladministration" --even things we might think of as NON-crimes-- could have a magnified effect due to the "high office" of the official, judge, president, etc. Most of the items that were considered "maladministration" would not be considered much of a problem at all if you or I practiced them. But they could become a perverting of justice or subject the populace to the ill effects in a way that only a person in high office had the ability to do. When James Madison discussed the formulation of the "constitution" with Mason, they started out with only Bribery and Treason, but Mason argued that the definition of Treason is too narrowly tied to enemies when at war, and that this would hardly cover situations when a president "attempts to subvert the Constitution." So the British term "maladministration" was suggested and then, after discussion, changed it to the more formal British term "high crimes and misdemeanors." According to the Wikipedia article on "Maladministration"  it means the following in UK law: The definition of maladministration is wide and can include: Delay Incorrect action or failure to take any action Failure to follow procedures or the law Failure to provide information Inadequate record-keeping Failure to investigate Failure to reply Misleading or inaccurate statements Inadequate liaison Inadequate consultation Broken promises That's such a vague definition that Madison said it would be the equivalent of just having a President who served at the pleasure of the Senate. It would "normalize" impeachment, and therefore the phrase "high crimes and misdemeanors" was deemed closer to the idea of "subverting the constitution." The phrase was definitely intended to narrow the reasons that the Senate might try to impeach a President, but was also a way to include things that would not nearly reach up to the definitions of bribery and treason. In Britain the phrase meant abuse of a high office even if the abuse did NOT violate any criminal laws. So this is how legal scholars have also applied it to the US presidency, usually with a focus on any subversion of the Constitution. The Wiki article on "High Crimes and Misdemeanors" includes the following that gives an idea of how the original framers understood it: Benjamin Franklin asserted that the power of impeachment and removal was necessary for those times when the Executive "rendered himself obnoxious," and the Constitution should provide for the "regular punishment of the Executive when his conduct should deserve it, and for his honorable acquittal when he should be unjustly accused." James Madison said that "impeachment... was indispensable" to defend the community against "the incapacity, negligence or perfidy of the chief Magistrate." With a single executive, Madison argued, unlike a legislature whose collective nature provided security, "loss of capacity or corruption was more within the compass of probable events, and either of them might be fatal to the Republic."[10] The process of impeaching someone in the House of Representatives and the Senate is difficult, made so to be the balance against efforts to easily remove people from office for minor reasons that could easily be determined by the standard of "high crimes and misdemeanors". It was George Mason who offered up the term "high crimes and misdemeanors" as one of the criteria to remove public officials who abuse their office. Their original intentions can be gleaned by the phrases and words that were proposed before, such as "high misdemeanor," "maladministration," or "other crime." Edmund Randolph said impeachment should be reserved for those who "misbehave." Charles Cotesworth Pinckney said, It should be reserved "for those who behave amiss, or betray their public trust." As can be seen from all these references to "high crimes and misdemeanors," the definition or its rationale does not relate to specific offences. This gives a lot of freedom of interpretation to the House of Representatives and the Senate. The constitutional law by nature is not concerned with being specific. The courts through precedence and the legislature through lawmaking make constitutional provisions specific. In this case the legislature (the House of Representatives and the Senate) acts as a court and can create a precedent. In Federalist No. 65, Alexander Hamilton said, "those offences which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or, in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated political, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself."[11] The first impeachment conviction by the United States Senate was in 1804 of John Pickering, a judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire, for chronic intoxication. Federal judges have been impeached and removed from office for tax evasion, conspiracy to solicit a bribe, and making false statements to a grand jury.[12]
    • France is in shambles right now. To this day the Yellow Vest still march, and as even stated before, which turns out to be true, protests everywhere, in and outside of France. The Americans will get quite the treat in a few weeks, this I am sure of due to the ongoing chaos we see now.
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