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  • Similar Content

    • By Jack Ryan
      Quote from a recent Watchtower....
      Erm no...
      The fact that millions of people KILL THEMSELVES every year shows us this cannot possibly be true.
      People commit suicide BECAUSE they can't cope with the stress anymore.
      Well they could argue "well they didn't ask for God's help..."
      Yea, well you know countless numbers of JWs sadly commit suicide too right...?
      So where was God when HIS people needed him eh?
      Just annoys me that they are adamant and blindly believe that God will be the "cure-all" but mostly that it trivialises suicide, which is a serious issue.
      I am so glad I'm not involved anymore!
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Date:
      March 12, 2018
      Source:
      University of British Columbia
      Summary:
      Therapy dog sessions for stressed-out students are an increasingly popular offering at North American universities. Now, new research confirms that some doggy one-on-one time really can do the trick of boosting student wellness.
      Therapy dog sessions for stressed-out students are an increasingly popular offering at North American universities. Now, new research from the University of British Columbia confirms that some doggy one-on-one time really can do the trick of boosting student wellness.
      "Therapy dog sessions are becoming more popular on university campuses, but there has been surprisingly little research on how much attending a single drop-in therapy dog session actually helps students," said Emma Ward-Griffin, the study's lead author and research assistant in the UBC department of psychology. "Our findings suggest that therapy dog sessions have a measurable, positive effect on the wellbeing of university students, particularly on stress reduction and feelings of negativity."
      In research published today in Stress and Health, researchers surveyed 246 students before and after they spent time in a drop-in therapy dog session. Students were free to pet, cuddle and chat with seven to 12 canine companions during the sessions. They also filled out questionnaires immediately before and after the session, and again about 10 hours later.
      The researchers found that participants reported significant reductions in stress as well as increased happiness and energy immediately following the session, compared to a control group of students who did not spend time at a therapy dog session. While feelings of happiness and life satisfaction did not appear to last, some effects did.
      Read more: 
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    • By The Librarian
      Allen Malcolm - Do Not Be Anxious Over Anything.mp3
      Agape!
      @The Librarian
    • By The Librarian
      Aljian Edward - Have No Anxiety.mp3
      Original
      Aljian Edward - Have No Anxiety Ver 2.mp3
      Version 2
      Aljian Edward - Have No Anxiety Ver 3.mp3
      Version 3
       
      Agape!
      @The Librarian
    • By Bible Speaks
      Can't sleep? It's called "over thinking." What is bothering you? Worries, pain, sadness, stress?
      ???
      "The peace of God that surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and your mental powers by means of Christ Jesus." (Phil.4:7)
      ???
      So many sad things happen to people, humans need comfort and relief. During the Thousand Year Reign of Christ, God “will wipe out every tear from their eyes, and death will be no more, neither will mourning nor outcry nor pain be anymore.” (Revelation 21:4) 
      ???
      It is wonderful to think that there will be no more pain and suffering. It is even more wonderful that God promises to take away death. 
      ???
      Try thinking about this when under stress and can't sleep? We are very close to this fulfillment of this wonderful prophecy and you can see this before your eyes come true. Now, get some sleep let go of anxiety and just "look ahead" miracles do come true. ???

    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Being mistreated at work can make people take out their frustrations on loved ones at home. But a new study suggests that getting more exercise and sleep may help people better cope with those negative emotions by leaving them at work, where they belong.
      People who burned more calories on a daily basis—by doing the equivalent of a long walk or swim—were less likely to take out their anger about work issues on people they lived with, the researchers found in the new study, which was published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.
      The researchers used activity trackers to record sleep patterns and physical activity of 118 graduate students with full-time jobs. Each participant, and one person he or she lived with, also completed surveys about sleep, exercise and feelings of mistreatment at home or work.
      Previous research shows that employees who are belittled or insulted by colleagues are likely to vent their frustrations and behave angrily toward people outside of work, says study co-author Shannon Taylor, a management professor at the University of Central Florida's College of Business.
      The new study backs up this idea, but offers a bit of good news, as well: Employees who averaged more than 10,500 steps a day or burned at least 2,100 calories were less likely to mistreat their cohabitants than those who averaged fewer steps or burned fewer calories.
      The researchers even calculated the exact energy expenditure needed to protect against work-to-home emotional spillover. Burning an additional 587 calories, the equivalent of a 90-minute brisk walk or an hour-long swim for a 195-pound male, can “substantially reduce the harmful effects of workplace undermining,” they wrote.
      The findings also revealed that when employees felt they had a bad night’s sleep because of work issues, they were more likely to be grouchy at home. “When you’re tired, you’re either less able or less motivated to regulate yourself,” says co-author Larissa Barber, professor of psychology at Northern Illinois University.
      Physical activity seems to counterbalance poor sleep, Barber says, because it promotes healthy brain functions needed to properly regulate emotions and behavior. “This study suggests that high amounts of exercise can be at least one way to compensate for sleep troubles that lead to negative behaviors at home,” she says.
      Barber acknowledges that finding time to work out and get a full night’s sleep can be difficult when work pressures are mounting—and that often, job stress can directly relate to sleep quality. (Her previous research suggests that not only can a bad day at the office keep us up at night, but that poor sleep can also affect how we interpret events at work.)
      But, she says, making the effort to burn some extra calories—and blow off some steam—can be worth it. It’s not only good for you, says Taylor, but it can benefit the people you live with as well.
      “I would advise people to think of sleep and exercise from an investment perspective rather than another task on the to-do list,” Barber says. “It may seem like more work upfront, but the boost in motivation and energy can help you avoid sinking deeper into workplace stress and productivity problems.”

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    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Sabrina here and I'm going to share a few insights that will
      actually change your life.

      Few things are inevitable in life: death, taxes.... and dealing
      with difficult people. From work to friendships to romantic
      relationships, difficult interactions can hit us from all angles
      and can take a heavy toll on us.

      A few days ago, I was doing some much needed
      reorganizing and I found this packet from a class I went to

      many moons ago.

       

      I can't remember who taught it, but
      the packet was filled with amazing and humorous "rules" for
      dealing with difficult people.

      Within these humorous insights are pearls of wisdom that can
      help you keep your cool during an argument or any other
      trying exchange.

      I really wish I could give you the source, but no names were
      written on the sheet so all I have is the information. I couldn't
      keep it all to myself though, so here are some amazing (and
      I'd even say life-changing) rules.


      The 24 Hour Rule
      It is imperative to wait 24 hours before reacting when we feel
      angry. This is because:
      - natural consequences will take care of the problem
      - you can calm down and come up with a different
      perspective
      - the issue is no longer important


      The Elephant Rule
      Picture that a huge, fat elephant is coming your way. What
      do you do? You move away and let the elephant go by. The
      same is true when someone negative, angry or bitter is
      coming your way. Instead of getting in his way, just move
      and let him go by. Don't provoke or try to argue with him
      because he might stamp you.

      The Madhouse Rule 
      While walking, you see a sign on a building that says
      "Madhouse" and for some reason you hear a man shouting
      from one of the windows saying: "HEY!! You man, are so
      crazy!"

      Do you really believe him? Do you take it personally? Do you
      let it bother your? Or do you ignore him and think: "Poor guy,
      he is locked in the madhouse and yet he thinks that I'm the
      crazy one."

      You might find it humorous or might even feel compassion,
      right?

      Well, you could have the same attitude towards other
      people, especially with strangers, people that hardly know
      you, or people in the street. For examples: why bother to
      react when another driver insults you? Or when a coworker
      is trying to push your buttons and you know it? This would be
      a good rule to apply.


      The Hospital Rule
      Imagine a very sick person that is lying on a  hospital bed,
      hooked up with so many tubes that it's almost impossible for
      him to move. You are sitting on the other side of the room
      feeling very thirsty. You notice that there is a glass of water
      right next to the sick person.

      What do you do? Do you ask him to pass you the glass?
      After all it is just a small glass, no big deal, right? It is
      obvious that you would not bother him; you know better than
      that because he's so sick! You don't expect him to pass the
      glass to you and you don't get angry or take it personally.

      And that is exactly what you should do when you are with
      people that cannot understand what you need, or are
      incapable of doing, saying, or giving what you would want. It
      is much better if you do not ask them, and do not expect
      them to do something for you.

      Trust me, you will definitely live better and you will have less stress in
      your life.

       
       Sabrina Alexis

      A New Mode 
       
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Here's how to strike that "Goldilocks" balance between too much stress and too little.

      This may come as unpleasant news, but all stress isn’t bad. That doesn't mean that feeling overwhelmed and exhausted at work isn't a problem—it is. But some stress, in short bursts, can actually drive your performance on the job if you know how to use it.
      And that's a bit of a balancing act. You don't need to be told that too much stress can hurt your health and productivity. But many people don't quite grasp how to use a certain degree of work-related stress to help them. Here's a look at the different kinds of stress you're likely to experience and how to strike that delicate balance.
      PUTTING ACUTE STRESS TO WORK
      Research from the University of California–Berkeley hints at how some stress can actually be helpful. In the 2013 study, researchers subjected stem cells in the brains of rats to significant but brief periods of stress (in other words, "acute" stress), which caused them to generate new cells. Two weeks later, after these new cells had matured, the rats’ alertness, learning, and memory had improved.
      The researchers inferred that acute stress may help keep the brain alert, and that better alertness equals better performance. From an evolutionary standpoint, this makes sense: Stress is what helps animals adapt and survive, and that's no less true for modern humans. Inanother study, scientists at UC San Francisco analyzed this effect on a cellular level in humans. The results indicated that while chronic stress is damaging, small bouts of acute stress keep our brains resilient and can condition us to persevere under pressure.
      So what does this research mean for the workplace? Simply that stress isn’t inherently bad and that some of it can actually be good. It can push employees forward and help them perform at their best. Think about delivering a presentation, landing a big account, or meeting a tight deadline. During each of these stressful events—which are limited in length and can feel intense but not life-threatening—employees kick into high gear and push themselves to get results.
      WHERE CHRONIC STRESS TAKES OVER
      Just because some stress is good doesn’t mean it all is, though. We’ve heard over and over again that stress can have a negative impact on our health and well-being. And that’s exactly what chronic stress does.
      As the Mayo Clinic explains, when we feel stress, hormones including adrenaline and cortisol are released. Once the stressful event is over, our hormone levels go back to normal. But when we constantly feel stressed, our response system stays active, which means our hormones remain at unhealthy levels for extended periods of time. This type of chronic stress impacts every system of the body, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. That can lead to changes in appetite, loss of sleep, panic and asthma attacks, heart disease, weight gain, and more, according to the American Psychological Association.
      Unfortunately, many professionals experience chronic stress on an daily basis. And when it takes a toll on the employees' health, it can hurt the health of a business as a whole. A 2015 study published inManagement Science found that workplace stress causes additional expenditures of anywhere from $125 to $190 billion dollars a year.
      So if occasional stress helps employees grow, but too much stunts them, the challenge is finding the right balance. Here are a few ways to do that.
      SET TOUGH BUT ACHIEVABLE CHALLENGE
      When employees get comfortable with their regular tasks, it’s time to push them outside their comfort zones with new responsibilities. Those unfamiliar tasks can introduce the right amount of stress that pushes them to take on new challenges and learn new things.
      If you’re going to give employees new tasks, though, you first need to remove some of the older responsibilities they’ve already mastered. Otherwise they’ll feel overloaded, which can lead to chronic stress. Many professionals feel they have an unrealistic amount of work to do already, so if you aren't careful to keep your team members' workloads in check, assigning that "stretch" assignment can lead to burnout, not growth.
      ASSIGN ONE BIG TASK AT A TIME
      Give employees a large task, like delivering a presentation, leading a meeting, spearheading an initiative, or taking the lead on a major project. Whatever the project is, only assign one at a time. That way, employees are clear on what their priorities are and what they need to focus on.
      Unclear expectations can be a huge stressor. Focusing on one project at a time will help clear up what needs to get done and allow employees to set realistic goals to complete them. At the same time, each new project will introduce small amounts of stress to steadily improve employees' performance and skill sets.
      GIVE YOUR TEAM MEMBERS CONTROL
      Many professionals feel they don't have enough control over the timelines for completing their work, a feeling that chronic stress tends to exacerbate. And when their managers constantly change their priorities, team members are left scrambling to stay on track—and chronically stressed out.
      Instead, work with employees to set realistic goals and deadlines. That doesn't mean getting rid of deadlines altogether—timetables can still help apply small amounts of acute stress, which can be useful. But it's important to give your team members some say over what deadlines make sense. That will help control stress levels to ensure that the pressure remains productive, not overwhelming.
      Chronic stress is rampant among employees, and employers need to do their part to help create healthier work environments. At the same time, they should challenge employees to reach their potential. So banishing stress from the workplace probably isn't a feasible solution any more than a desirable one. The right balance is tough to strike, but it's achievable. In fact, that's a pretty good target for work itself—tough but achievable.

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