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Angry people versus Loving people

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    • Guest Indiana
      By Guest Indiana
      WASHINGTON -- Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
      "As most people age, they simply cannot do the activities they once did, or they may experience the loss of a spouse or a decline in their physical mobility and they can become angry," said Meaghan A. Barlow, MA, of Concordia University, lead author of the study, which was published in Psychology and Aging. "Our study showed that anger can lead to the development of chronic illnesses, whereas sadness did not."
      Barlow and her co-authors examined whether anger and sadness contributed to inflammation, an immune response by the body to perceived threats, such as infection or tissue damage. While inflammation in general helps protect the body and assists in healing, long-lasting inflammation can lead to chronic illnesses in old age, according to the authors.
      The researchers collected and analyzed data from 226 older adults ages 59 to 93 from Montreal. They grouped participants as being in early old age, 59 to 79 years old, or advanced old age, 80 years old and older.
      Over one week, participants completed short questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt. The authors also measured inflammation from blood samples and asked participants if they had any age-related chronic illnesses.
      "We found that experiencing anger daily was related to higher levels of inflammation and chronic illness for people 80 years old and older, but not for younger seniors," said study co-author Carsten Wrosch, PhD, also of Concordia University. "Sadness, on the other hand, was not related to inflammation or chronic illness."
      Read more: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/apa-amh050219.php
    • By Bible Speaks
      Love 💗 is Everywhere You Just Have to Show it! It Will Return Back to You!
      Jehovah God Teaches Us to Love One Another and Summer Did His Son Jesus Christ Follow His Footsteps? 👣 👣 👣
      #Repost @earthpix
      ・・・
      Feel the love 💕 Photo by @david_hemmings_photo_tours

    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      People make more efforts to obtain the object that is associated with angry faces.
    • Guest
      By Guest
      Lyrics There was a time
      We thought our dream was over
      When you and I
      Had surely reached the end
      Still here we are
      The flame as strong as ever
      All because we both kept holding on
      We know we can weather any storm
      Baby, that's what love is all about
      Two hearts that find a way, somehow
      To keep the fire burning
      It's something we could never live without
      It it takes forever
      We can work it out
      Beyond a shadow of a doubt
      Baby, that's what love is all about
      As time goes by
      We've learned to rediscover
      The reason why
      This dream of our survives
      Through thick and thin
      We're destined for each other
      Knowing we can reach the other side
      Far beyond the mountains of our pride
      Ridin' the good times is easy
      The hard times can tear you apart
      There'll be times in your heart
      When the feelin' is gone
      But ya keep on believing
      And ya keep holdin' on
      Baby, that's what love is all about
      Two hearts that find a way, somehow
      To keep the dream from dying
      It's something we could never live without
      If it takes forever
      We can work it out
      Beyond a shadow of a doubt
      Baby, that's what love is all about
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      HereÂ’s what they are:
      1. Be together for the right reasons
      DonÂ’t ever be with someone because someone else pressured you to. I got married the first time because I was raised Catholic and thatÂ’s what you were supposed to do. Wrong. I got married the second time because I was miserable and lonely and thought having a loving wife would fix everything for me. Also wrong. Took me three tries to figure out what should have been obvious from the beginning, the only reason you should ever be with the person youÂ’re with is because you simply love being around them. It really is that simple.
      – Greg
      Before we even get into what you should do in your relationship, letÂ’s start with what not to do.
      When I sent out my request to readers for advice, I added a caveat that turned out to be illuminating. I asked people who were on their second or third (or fourth) marriages what they did wrong. Where did they mess up?
      By far, the most common answer was “being with the person for the wrong reasons.”
      Some of these wrong reasons included:
      Pressure from friends and family Feeling like a “loser” because they were single and settling for the first person that came along Being together for image—because the relationship looked good on paper (or in photos), not because the two people actually admired each other Being young and naive and hopelessly in love and thinking that love would solve everything As we’ll see throughout the rest of this article, everything that makes a relationship “work” (and by work, I mean that it is happy and sustainable for both people involved) requires a genuine, deep-level admiration for each other. Without that mutual admiration, everything else will unravel.
      The other “wrong” reason to enter into a relationship is, like Greg said, to “fix” yourself. This desire to use the love of someone else to soothe your own emotional problems inevitably leads to codependence, an unhealthy and damaging dynamic between two people where they tacitly agree to use each other’s love as a distraction from their own self-loathing. We’ll get more into codependence later in this article, but for now, it’s useful to point out that love, itself, is neutral. It is something that can be both healthy or unhealthy, helpful or harmful, depending on why and how you love someone else and are loved by someone else. By itself, love is never enough to sustain a relationship.
      Read more: https://qz.com/884448/every-successful-relationship-is-successful-for-the-same-exact-reasons/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Here are five tips to help you let go of your exes for good:
      1. Start a self-improvement routine, complete with daily, weekly, and monthly goal setting. 
      2. Meet with someone weekly to discuss your personal growth and your journey.
      This person will help keep you accountable to your goals and lifestyle choices. Can be a friend or an amazing coach.
      3. Stay single for a year—totally single.
      If you can’t be happy with you, you won’t be happy—truly happy—with anyone else. Love that you! Commit to being successfully single for a year. That means happy, connected in your community, fulfilled in your work, and in a state of continuous personal growth. (Your daily routines and long-term goals will be critical to this step.)
      4. Surround yourself with positive, uplifting people.
      Join a faith community where people strive to live out the values you identify with. This is where you’ll find the deep connections that you can grow with—and that will prevent you from leaning on your exes as crutches.
      5. Pray or meditate often.
      Use your emotions as mindfulness cues. When you miss someone, pray for them. When you’re lonely, pray for the courage, positivity, and fortitude to make good decisions. When you think you can’t go on—that happens to everyone—pray for what you need. This will help you grow faith in a higher power and yourself, which is an absolute must if you want to be happy alone. 
      And being happy alone? That’s an absolute must for loving someone unconditionally in a relationship that can last a lifetime.
      Read the article: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/the-danger-of-holding-onto-past-relationships-how-to-finally-let-go?utm_term=pos-8&utm_source=mbg&utm_medium=email&utm_content=daily1&utm_campaign=170706
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Mindfulness and Anxiety.pdf
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Relationship issues are inevitable; they are a part of our human experience. And this part of our life, essential to our well-being, can bring us to our knees or make us feel bad about who we are.
      Have you ever heard yourself say these things?
      "I hate the way you make me feel." "What you are doing makes me insecure, and when you stop doing that, I will be happy." "I can't deal with the way this relationship makes me feel anymore." We are all affected by our relationships in some way. However, no matter what you are experiencing, there is one thing you can always do that will immediately affect how you feel and, in addition, will empower you and make you feel good about who you are instead of leaving you feeling depleted, exhausted, or lost. So what can you do in the moment that you are at your wit's end, feeling hurt, upset, or confused?
      Simply reconnect to yourself and use this very challenge, issue, or difficulty to become stronger and more of who you are meant to be. Use this challenge to become stronger and more powerful instead of allowing it to break you down or make you feel like a victim.
      Here are three ways to take back the reins of your life and immediately change how you feel about yourself and your relationship:
      1. Let go of the concept of "right and wrong."
      Very simply, instead of focusing on what the other person did or didn't do, observe how you're feeling and identify what you need. By doing this, you are turning your attention back to yourself instead of being paralyzed and disempowered by pointing the finger at the other person.
      If you've ever said, "If you would just change, everything would be OK," you know how easy it is to focus your attention on what the other person has said or done. The next time you find yourself doing this, ask yourself, "If this is the perfect person to help me become who I'm meant to be, what am I supposed to be learning from this relationship?"
      2. Give up trying to change the other person.
      Although this isn't easy, make a commitment to yourself to work on accepting the other person as they are. Each person brings their own "stuff" to a relationship—we all have our own history with our own issues, wounds, and challenges to overcome.
      The next time you feel yourself taking on the other person's issue or trying to "fix" them, remind yourself that the only person you can change is you. And affirm for yourself, "I will focus on how I'm being affected and what I need to work through and will allow the other person space to work through their issues as well." By declaring this, you will be better equipped to not take on the other person's issues or take their actions personally.
      3. Learn how to stop basing your worth on the condition of your relationship.
      Give yourself the gift of diving deeper into your own inner exploration and development. By doing this, you will become more at peace with who you are and will know at a deep level that you are OK—even when your relationship isn't perfect or when things are happening that are hurtful or upsetting.
      Begin by making a commitment to your growth. Affirm that reconnecting to yourself is the most important journey you will ever take. Then take one simple action this week: Start reading a self-help book, research a personal development course, or take 10 minutes each day to check in with yourself and identify what you need by asking, "What can I do in this moment to reconnect to who I am and what I need?" A few examples could be writing down three things that make you feel good about yourself, looking at some photos that bring a smile to your face, or spending some time in nature today.
      Relationships are in a constant state of flux and bring a level of complexity to our lives that is out of our control. The one thing we always control is whether we will use our challenges to grow, expand, and become more of who we are meant to be or, instead, allow them to hold us back and limit our potential.
      Today, make a declaration that you will use even the most difficult relationship in your life for a monumental purpose—your life's purpose—to grow and evolve into the person you are meant to be. And then do just that.
      https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29951/the-one-shift-that-will-immediately-change-how-you-feel-in-your-relationship.html?utm_source=mbg&utm_medium=email&utm_content=daily&utm_campaign=170424
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      I have been asked, “Can anger be addictive?” After working with individuals one-on-one in counseling and in groups, I have to say it absolutely can be. It is important to know what type of anger you tend to experience—the the types those around you may experience—in order to deal with anger efficiently and, dare I say, wisely.
      The twelve types of anger are very distinct, but some do have overlapping commonalities and qualities that make them appear similar. To break them down into their common components, here is a look at each anger type.
      1. Resistant and passive anger:
      These individuals believe that all anger is wrong or bad. They avoid conflict like the plague. They were told as children (or taught through actions) that all anger is unacceptable. These people bottle up their emotions and keep everything inside. They are prone to physical and mental illness.
      2. Internet/tech rage:
      Have you ever noticed that some people are especially prone to respond strongly to slow Internet speed or social media interactions? They may even go online seeking quarrels. Interestingly, this is also common in texting addictions which often also lead to anger issues.
      3. Addictive anger:
      Anger becomes addictive when it involves significant adrenaline rushes, which the individual comes to depend upon, psychologically and/or physically. This type of anger provides a sense of strength and courage. Interestingly, individuals who possess this anger type are often interested in—or engage in—violent media (TV, movies, video games and sports).
      4. Petrified anger:
      This anger is largely based on holding grudges and refusing to forgive. Individuals are reluctant to let their anger go. Instead they keep vendettas against others.
      5. Compressive anger:
      Individuals with this type of anger are walking time bombs. They have a hairline trigger, waiting to be ignited and set off. Once angry, it spirals out of control and they cannot contain it.
      6. Jealousy:
      This type of anger stems from childhood. It is largely based on abandonment and loss, often times parental divorce, or feeling a sense of rejection. One’s anger evolves to the need to possess—and even own others—This can lead to "stalking."
      7. Road rage:
      Did you know that one of the main factors in road rage is speeding? It is often caused by traffic congestion and feeling trapped. Interestingly, people who feel "disrespected" while driving (others following too close, cutting one off or making unplanned road changes) can develop this rage.
      8. Conflictual anger:
      Individuals with this anger type continually look to create strife, cause disagreements or argue. They prepare and plan in advance to disagree with others. They often lack self-esteem, and may possess what is called an inflamed ego.
      9. Habitual anger:
      With this type, individuals come to need the feeling of anger as a release. Anger is extremely normal to them and they embrace it! They do not know any other way for feeling and dealing with things. Interestingly, there is a long line of "anger" in their family lineage.
      10. Passive aggression:
      This anger type is largely based on the premise, “I don’t get mad, I get even!” People with this kind of anger are sneaky about it. They lack social skills and problem-solving abilities. They almost never get what they want in life.
      11. Moralistic anger:
      This anger is largely based on extremism and fundamentalism, even a sense of "entitlement." These individuals need to be right and powerful and superior to others. It is a hallmark of racism, prejudice, sexism and hatred.
      12. Manipulative anger:
      These people use their anger to manipulate others. They use childish power plays such as threats, crying, pouting or screaming.
      So, what can you do about it?
      To first understand, identify and work with one’s own anger, or the anger of another, one has to own the feeling, “What are you truly feeling?”
      Next you need to ask, “Why are you feeling this way?” This means uncovering the underlying thoughts that are leading to these feelings.
      There are a host of wonderful methods for changing how you express your own anger, or dealing with others around you who are anger that I discuss in my book. Several of the most accessible methods are these:
      1. Try The Big Adios:
      Learn when and how to walk away from a potentially bad situation. Remember, you could do more harm than good if you choose to remain in your current situation. If you are the explosive or aggressive type, if your anger lands you in trouble with the law, your boss or your family, then “exit stage left” is probably the best option for you.
      2. Create permanent reminders:
      Keep constant reminders, both visual and verbal. I encourage you to write down on one side of paper your fears (in regard to anger), and on the other side something which makes you feel good (a loved one/child), or something spiritually motivating, and have it laminated on a card. Remember, for this to work it has to be something which touches your heart and mind. It has to motivate you.
      3. Shift your perspective:
      Learn how to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. It can change the dynamics of a situation or relationship for the better very quickly. Reflective listening skills are at the heart of perspective and can often de-escalate conflict and confrontations before they get out of hand. This approach works in anger-management because when you focus on the intention of words spoken, your mind no longer has time to dwell on confrontational and aggressive responses
      4. Own your feelings:
      Taking ownership and feeling in control can make a world of difference. If you choose to own your emotions, no one can control you. In fact, you start to gain better control over your own thought process.
      5. Stay present:
      You need to learn that you can only control the here and now. Keeping your emotions in the present state is paramount when you are involved with people who have wronged you in the past. Reliving the affronting situation in your mind only gets the juices flowing, the pulse racing and the angry thoughts recurring all over again. You need to stop this if you are ever going to move on.
      6. Try parroting:
      This is a fun and sneaky way to take a harsh situation and lighten it, even making others laugh instead of getting angrier. Parroting works just as it suggests. You repeat the same thing over and over again until you get what you want. You are not hurting, harming or threatening anyone. In fact, you are basically asserting your intention on the other person and leaving it up to them to respond. This approach works remarkably well if you are a parent having difficulty getting your kids to listen to you.
      The key thing to always remember is that no one can make you angry unless you allow them. You are in control of your emotions—even when it doesn't feel like it.
      https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29493/the-12-types-of-anger-how-to-defuse-each-for-healthier-relationships.html?utm_source=mbg&utm_medium=email&utm_content=daily&utm_campaign=170326
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      We all want to feel understood, respected, and appreciated in our relationships. But life can often get in the way and undermine the connection we used to have with our significant other, leaving our love feeling lackluster. It doesn't take much to feel like you're moving in opposite directions.
      Then there are the couples that appear to have perfect relationships. They light up when they see each other, speak highly of their significant other, and rarely seem to bicker. It's easy to assume that there is a magical connection between them that only a few get blessed with.
      But what if they were doing a few simple things that were responsible for keeping their relationship healthy?
      There are some basic things you can do to foster that sense of deep love and connection, even when you feel like your relationship is already starting on the back foot. These tips have the ability to significantly improve how happy and satisfied you both feel in your relationship. It's these behaviors that keep those happy relationships flourishing.
      Here are 3 ways you can start fostering positivity in your relationship:
      1. Start with your personal happiness.
      Happy people create positive relationships. If you are waiting for someone else to make you happy, you will always feel let down. When you're happy within yourself, you reflect that back into your relationship. Start with recognizing how you would rate your level of happiness currently. If you're not as happy as you'd like to be, ask yourself, "What can I do to support myself to feel happier?" The answer could include restarting a hobby, beginning a new health routine, connecting more with friends, or taking steps to follow a passion that is deep within your heart. The crucial element is that you need to step up and take responsibility for your own well-being. By taking action, you will feel more empowered and recognize that happiness ultimately has to be an inside job. This change in energy will move into your relationship.
      2. Look for the good.
      We're all happier when we feel appreciated. It's therefore hardly a surprise that relationships need more positive interactions than negative ones if they are going to thrive. Dr. Gottman's famous research found that you need to have five positive interactions for every negative interaction if your relationship is going to stay happy. Begin with consciously watching for what your partner is doing right, rather than consistently focusing on what they are doing wrong. Look for opportunities to voice your appreciation and aim to add as many positive interactions into your shared experience as you can. Feeling positive emotions is a precursor to a happy relationship. You have the ability to focus your attention so that you look for and appreciate the good in your partner. This simple action ultimately helps to remedy the balance of positive-to-negative interactions and set a relationship back on a healthy track.
      3. Make space to nurture your connection.
      Positive relationships are sustained by a foundation of strong connection. Just like a small child needs attention to feel truly happy, a relationship needs nurturing if it is going to continue to stay healthy. It is important to put time aside exclusively to connect with your significant other. Rather than assuming it will just happen, create it. It may be a monthly date night (where, thankfully, there is no TV to distract you), taking a walk together, scheduling a vacation, or choosing to fall asleep while cuddling on the couch rather than going to bed alone. Remember that time and energy dedicated to fostering your union is essential. Where your energy goes your attention flows. Attention is the fuel that will help your partner feel important and valued in your life, which will likely lead to the reciprocating of care and kindness.
      Even when your relationship isn't as happy as you'd like it to be, there are things you can do to improve it. When you take care of yourself and resolve to show up positively for your partner, things begin to flourish. The result—you'll feel both happier in yourselves and in your coupling.
      http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29027/3-ways-to-improve-your-relationship-that-have-nothing-to-do-with-your-partner.html?utm_source=mbg&utm_medium=email&utm_content=daily&utm_campaign=170316
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Opposites attract, so date someone who's nothing like you. But, wait a minute—isn't it important to find someone who has a similar background, values, and goals? There's so much conflicting dating advice out there, how can you possibly figure out how to find love?
      While it's true that finding a partner with qualities that differ from yours can add balance and excitement to a relationship, problems can arise when there are too many differences. The more compatible you are with your partner, the more successful your relationship will likely be.
      Here are seven areas of compatibility to examine when choosing a partner. They don't all have to line up perfectly, but the more aligned you two are, the better the relationship will be.
      1. Temperament
      Do you get along well most of the time or find that he/she irritates you on a regular basis? Do you find yourself saying, "If only she'd think before she spoke" or "I wish he'd be less lazy"? Is he overly anxious? Does her alphabetized music collection make your skin crawl? What you see is what you get; so if you don't like your partner's temperament, don't try to fix it. Find someone whose personality is more compatible with yours.
      2. Communication style
      Are you direct or indirect in communicating what's important to you? Are you passive while she's assertive? Do you hold things in until you explode or speak your mind clearly and directly? If you can both communicate clearly and in a similar fashion, you'll have a much higher chance for a successful relationship.
      3. Friends and family
      Do you like and get along with each other's friends and family? Do you agree about how much time to devote to both? And if you're both single parents thinking about tying the knot, are you clear about how you'll parent? If friends and family issues become too stressful, they will have a very negative effect on your relationship.
      4. Nutrition and fitness
      Are you a gluten-free vegan while he is a Big Mac addict? Do you surf the waves on the weekend, while she's home surfing the web? This may seem like a minor point, but think about how many meals you will share with each other. How do your partner's food choices and attention to fitness align with your lifestyle and values? If you're not a good match in this area, you will probably have big challenges in your relationship.
      5. Financial
      Many people say that they are seeking a partner who is financially secure. In today's volatile financial market, financial security is not something you can count on. A few more appropriate questions are, "Are you responsible with finances? Are you generous? Do you contribute to charities?" Money is one of the things couples fight about most often. It is helpful if you share similar financial goals and habits.
      6. Education
      I don't believe you have to be with someone who has the exact same level of education. In fact, there are many brilliant people who never graduated college (Steve Jobs, Rachael Ray). However, couples who share similar backgrounds in education (and that includes self-study), life, and professional experience are usually better suited for each other. They have more in common and can relate to each other in a deeper way. They are on the same wavelength and truly "get" each other.
      7. Intimacy
      There are many things that come under the category of intimacy, including romance and public display of affection. Some couples have different sexual needs, which can lead to anger and resentment. An essential component of a lasting loving relationship includes having similar ideas about frequency and style of intimacy. So if you're more Mr. Fifty Shades and she's Ms. Low Libido, you will have issues in your relationship.
      What can you do if you are not compatible?
      It doesn't have to mean things can never work, but these are your options:
      Accept things as they are. Work on yourself and the relationship. Leave the relationship. Remember that the only person you can change is yourself. You partner will only change if he/she wants to.
      If you are dating to find a lasting, loving relationship, it is far more effective to choose a compatible partner from the start than to try to fix a relationship with a weak foundation. Don't be afraid to walk away if your basic needs are not met. There are millions of singles in the world. Move on and find a better fit. And make sure to use the most powerful four-letter word in dating—"Next!"
      http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-29324/7-signs-youre-dating-the-right-person.html?utm_source=mbg&utm_medium=email&utm_content=daily&utm_campaign=170315
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      I received the below question from someone recently, and it reminded me how difficult it can be to distinguish the things that truly matter in a relationship from the things that we have been told "should" matter.
      Question: I've been dating Josh for about three months. He's a great guy, good-looking, smart, and most importantly, he treats me with respect. However, I've had a tough dating and relationship history. I was engaged to a guy who never followed through with his promises and broke off the engagement. I was married to a man who cheated. As you can imagine, trust has been difficult for me.
      I've been working on myself, and I now love and respect myself so much more. Because of that, I've been able to slowly develop this wonderful relationship. I don't want things to go wrong.
      Here's the problem: Josh has never said, "I love you." I feel that he really cares, but I'd feel so much better if I heard those words. Am I being silly or insecure? Or should I be concerned if he doesn't say those three magic words?
      Here's what I told her. I hope it helps you, too.
      Josh sounds like he's a good partner for you. He respects and cherishes you, which is fundamental to a lasting relationship. He honors and values you because you've learned to love yourself and to stop tolerating liars and cheaters.
      It sounds like this is a much healthier relationship than you've ever experienced. Let's celebrate that!
      You ask about those three little words; when is the right time to say, "I love you"? It sounds like you're ready to profess your love, and he might not be there yet. Here's how to know where you stand.
      Watch his actions, not his words.
      If he's showing you that he cares for you, that's what matters most. As you probably know, words are not as important as follow-through and consistency.
      I would be more concerned if he said "I love you" after only four dates, and his actions didn't match up. How do you know if his actions mean that he loves you? I have created an assessment to help you figure out if someone loves you, whether they've said it or not:
      Is this person calling and texting consistently?
      Do you get together on a regular basis?
      Is the relationship escalating and growing?
      Do you feel valued and cherished by this person?
      Do you feel safe with them (emotionally and physically)?
      Are they considerate, kind, and thoughtful?
      Do you feel good about the relationship when you're with them AND when you're not?
      Is this person open to talking things out when you disagree?
      If you can answer "yes" to all of the questions above, that person cares deeply about you and prioritizes you in their life.
      It's helpful to know that people express their love in many different ways, and it's not always in the way that we expect. In the wonderful book, The Five Love Languages, author Gary Chapman lists the five ways of expressing love as follows:
      Words of Affirmation
      Quality Time Giving Gifts Acts of Service Physical Touch I suggest you take the love languages assessment to find out what your preferred language of expression is. I highly recommend that you ask Josh to do the same so you can learn his love language too.
      Understanding the way you each express love is one of the keys to accepting and embracing your partner. It can lessen the anxiety you feel when you aren't getting what you need in a relationship.
      So, is it really important to hear the words "I love you"?
      I believe those three words are highly overrated. They can be meaningful if they're said in the right context and with sincerity. But they can mean different things to different people. To one partner, "I love you" means "I think you might be the ONE I've been searching for my whole life." To the other, "I love you" means "I like you a lot, and I want to sleep with you."
      There are many other ways to express your love. So, remember to watch what he does more than what he says. Understand each other's love languages. And once you've done that, you'll be able to take a deep breath and stop worrying so much about whether or not someone says I love you. Do you feel loved? That's all that matters.
      By Sandy Weiner/MBG
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Would you continue communicating with a brother/sister you like/have feelings but he/she has not showed romantic interest in you, maybe even clearly has said not to your intentions? 
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      (CNN)Together for 74 years, even death couldn't keep Leonard Cherry and his wife Hazel apart.
      The Cherrys were high school sweethearts, married in January 1942 in Muldoon, Texas. Last week they died, just a few hours apart. Their only grandson, Craig Cherry, said their love was the strongest love that he had ever seen.
      "The two were always smiling and always deeply in love," Cherry told CNN affiliate KWTX.
      Although family members are mourning their loss, the couple's 72-year-old son, David Cherry, is grateful that his mother and father can be together forever.
      "I feel blessed that Daddy's suffering is over, and I feel blessed that Mom is with him and that she didn't have to live alone."
      Leonard Cherry, 95, had been in hospice care only days before his death at the St. Catherine Center in Waco, while Hazel Cherry, 93, who was in good health, moved into The Village at Providence Park, a nursing home, just next door.
      "Mother had been driving around town and still going to the grocery store as recently as two weeks ago, but Dad's health had been failing for some years," David Cherry told the affiliate.
      Leonard Cherry died at 1 p.m. on Thursday. His wife passed at 11 p.m. It was not immediately clear what caused her death.
      David Cherry said his parents would be missed.
      "It's kind of hard you know, you can't pick up the phone and call them anymore, or call mother and can't go by and see Dad," he said. "The more I began to think about it, I began to smile because of how much they loved each other."
      Leonard Cherry became a B-24 bomber pilot after enlisting in the Army Air Corps at the start of World War II. Stationed at Carswell Army Air Corps Base in Fort Worth, he trained others to fly the plane.
      Once the war was over, Leonard stayed in Fort Worth and went to work as an auto body repair man. He later owned his own auto repair business that he and his wife operated until 1980, but the couple of almost 40 years wanted to be closer to their grandchild and son.
      Leonard sold his auto repair business and the couple moved to Woodway to spend the rest of their lives together.
      A memorial service is scheduled for the two Friday.
      http://edition.cnn.com/2016/11/02/health/couple-dies-same-day-trnd/index.html
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      It took 5 years after my divorce for me to start meeting people again.
      For many years I couldn’t imagine ever meeting anyone new because I was still stuck on my past relationship. I enjoyed marinating in the past, feeling sorry for myself, guilty for what had happened, and fearful of what could happen in another relationship.
      I had no desire to meet someone new. As time passed and I did the work of grieving and healing, things changed. In a more grounded and healed space, I am open to meeting new people in my life.
      Having met a few women of late, I’m beginning to wonder if another relationship is even possible. Is the “one” person out there for me? Will I find love again? Will I find another relationship?
      I know that if you’re divorced, broken up, or single for a long time, it can feel like you’ll never meet someone again. You might feel like you’ve done everything you can to meet that special someone but it doesn’t seem to be working.
      Here are 7 things to keep in mind if you feel like you will never be with someone again.
       
      You are enough by yourself.
      Before you can meet someone and find a relationship, you must do inner work. Some of us have a lot of inner work to do. You might not know how to love yourself. Others might have a bad relationship with themselves. You might not feel complete or enough. Before seeking a relationship, you have to learn to be enough by just being you. This means accepting yourself for who you are. It’s realizing that you don’t need anyone but yourself. It’s realizing that you are complete. To realize that you are enough, look for ways to honor and appreciate yourself. Think about your loving and generous nature. Affirm daily that you are enough, you are loving and you are complete.
      How you treat yourself is more important than any relationship.
      You want a relationship filled with kisses, kind words, shared memories, and support, but can you receive love from someone else if you can’t accept it from yourself? Before trying to love someone else, love yourself. Do for yourself what you would do for someone else. Be considerate to yourself. Be patient to yourself. Be positive to yourself. Be gentle with yourself in the words you use and the way you treat yourself. Treat yourself to what you would enjoy. Splurge on yourself so you feel pampered and taken care of. Get enough sleep, rest, exercise, nutritious food and self-care. Treat yourself as you would treat your most devoted and passionate lover. If you’re seeking more ideas, check out my self-romance book here.
      Visualize the relationship you want in your life.
      It is important to know what kind of person you want in your life, so visualize them. Think of the person’s characteristics, values and world perspective. I try to focus on the internal qualities that I am looking for instead of the external ones. I’m not as preoccupied with someone’s career, looks or credentials. I’m not hiring someone to work for me or someone to show off to others. I’m looking for someone who is compatible with me, someone I can live with for the long term. So, visualize this person, but focus on what matters. What qualities in a partner do you desire? How would those qualities make you feel? Imagine the sensations and feelings of being with the person you adore and who fits the picture you’re looking for.
      Let go of your attachment to having a relationship.
      While it is good to have a picture of the person you want, you have to balance that with the need to let go of that picture as well. Don’t obsessively focus on that person in your visions. Worst of all, don’t focus on the fact that this person is not yet in your life. Engage in moments of visualization daily, but then let go. Learn to be comfortable with yourself and without that person in your life. Let go of the “needy” or “lack” energy in your life. Don’t focus on what you don’t have. Focus on the fact that the universe is doing its work to bring you that person. You do your part (living your life) and surrender to the rest.
      Your beliefs rule your life.
      Your beliefs affect your thoughts. Your thoughts affect your actions and your words. All of this ultimately affects your reality. Your belief system rules your life more than anything else, yet it’s the one thing you can’t see. If you feel hopeless about love or frustrated that you won’t ever meet anyone, you’re likely right. You cannot have self-sabotaging beliefs and expect life to give you something better than what you’re thinking about all the time. If you want a relationship, it’s essential that you shift your belief to a more empowering one. Visualize that person coming into your life. Affirm that you’ll meet someone. Trust that you’ll do it at the right time. Continue to see a picture of what’s possible and believe that you’ll meet the right person. Affirm and commit yourself to a positive picture of love each day. No matter what the past has held, believe your time for love is right around the corner.
      Live your life to the fullest.
      Regardless of what’s happening in your love life, the way to propel it forward is to live your best life every day. Many people are waiting to live until they meet their partner. You don’t need a partner to live the life you want to have. Sitting at home, refusing to go out with friends and being allergic to doing those things that bring you joy are not helping you find love. If you’re doing those things you’re passionate about and enjoying life every day, you’re more likely to see love coming your way. Raise the vibrations in your life to what it is you want to experience. If you fill yourself with happiness, joy, friendship and companionship each day, even without a partner, you will draw more of that into your life.
      Be open to meeting people.
      You have to mentally be open to meeting people wherever you are. You also have to open your heart to meeting people. Are your mind and heart open to relationships or closed like a castle door? If you’re avoiding social events, staying away from group activities and refusing to engage with bigger groups of people, you’re preventing yourself from finding the person you’re looking for. Instead of hiding in your cubicle or in your tiny space in the world, take small steps to come out of your shell. Get comfortable being around a couple of people and build yourself up to being in bigger groups. You may not like to be in bigger crowds, but challenge yourself each time. Your best life (and your dream partner) are waiting for you outside of your comfort zone.
      https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/youre-afraid-love-will-never-show-dg/
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