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Caleb and Sophia video game at Bethel, Madrid
 

Caleb and Sophia video game at Bethel, Madrid

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Yikes .... now I will have to add that to my extensive list of flotsam and jetsam from St. Caleb, and St. Sophia.

(Caleb and Sophia Merchandise, purses, briefcases, pins, buttons, slacks, suspenders and bow ties, and pictures, back car window decals, book covers, wall posters, 3d dolls like GB Bro. Anthony Morris III has in his Bethel Office, Videos, DVDs, coloring books, decorated birthd...er... baptism cakes, stand up displays, literature bags, greeting cards, Sophia colorful tote bags for girls, and Sophia cloth shopping bags for Wal-Mart, etc., book markers, key chains, 3d Printer statues of Caleb, ball point pens, and penlights, pins and brooches for older Sisters, and cartoon wall hangings for the inside of Caleb and Sophia dioramas, or JW.ORG men's ties, lapel pins, wristwatches, aluminum military style dog tags, rings, aluminum pendants for neck chains and charm bracelets, car bumper stickers, car window decals, women's pocket mirrors, flags to tie to radio aerials, put on flagpoles outside Chilean Kingdom Halls ( ... what's a Chilean Kingdom Hall doing with a flagpole, anyway ...?) Swiss Assembly Grounds, and OTHER places where a pale blue flag would look spiffy, and in the absence of a breeze, look like a U.N. Flag hanging limp. Then there is the JW.ORG blue oversized umbrellas, Unisex Hoodie Jackets, neck lanyards, hand lunch boxes with Paradise scenes, and of course Caleb and Sophia., and to contrast, from Peru, a BRIGHT Pink Caleb and Sophia Bible cover entitled New World Translation of the HOLY SCRIPTURES ... over a large picture of guess whom? Of course the refrigerator magnets and motivational jewelry are big sellers, not so much for the Caleb crochetable doll ?)

 

Wherever shall I insert it?

(Disregarding any comments about "where the light don't shine ...".

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Guest Indiana

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Does anyone here know what  that game is about? I am wondering what is the equivalent of King Koopa 😂

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It looks like a version of "Mario Brothers", but instead of having Armenian Plumbers in work clothes jumping gaps and mushroom to mushroom, they have white, Anglo-Saxon Caucasians with suit coats and ties  jump from house to house.

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