Jump to content

David Normand

Member
  • Content Count

    205
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

193 Excellent

1 Follower

About David Normand

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. According to Strongs Concordance: G3552 νοσέω noseō nos-eh'-o From G3554; to be sick, that is, (by implication of a diseased appetite) to hanker after (figuratively to harp upon): - dote. Total KJV occurrences: 1 G3554 νόσος nosos nos'-os Of uncertain affinity; a malady (rarely figurative of moral disability): - disease, infirmity, sickness. Total KJV occurrences: 12 Basically, referring to them as diseased is allowable: at least according to Strong's Concordance.
  2. https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/religious-groups-can-decide-own-membership-rules-supreme-court-says-1.3953336 Hopefully the link worked. Here is the text. OTTAWA -- A Jehovah's Witness who was expelled from a Calgary congregation cannot take his case to a judge, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled in a decision that affirms the general right of religious organizations to govern their own affairs. In a 9-0 decision Thursday, the high court said the Alberta Court of Queen's Bench has no jurisdiction to review the congregation's decision to shun Randy Wall over alleged drunkenness and verbal abuse. "In the end, religious groups are free to determine their own membership and rules," Justice Malcolm Rowe wrote in the decision, adding that courts will not intervene in such matters unless it is necessary to resolve an underlying legal dispute. Religious and civil liberties organizations took an active interest in the case, given questions about the degree to which the courts can scrutinize decisions by faith-based bodies. Wall, an independent real estate agent, was summoned in 2014 to appear before the judicial committee of the Highwood Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, a four-person panel of elders. He admitted to two episodes of drunkenness and, on one of those occasions, verbally abusing his wife -- wrongdoing he attributed to family stress over the earlier expulsion of his 15-year old daughter from the congregation. The judicial committee told Wall, a congregation member since 1980, that he, too, would be expelled because he was not sufficiently repentant. Members who are "disfellowshipped" may still attend congregational meetings, but they are permitted to speak only to immediate family members about non-spiritual matters. An appeal committee upheld the decision, prompting Wall to pursue the matter in provincial court. He alleged the congregational judicial committee did not give him proper notice, an adequate opportunity to be heard or reasons for its decision. The congregation argued that Wall's application for review should be tossed out because a secular court had no jurisdiction to review a religious tribunal's decision. In a submission to the Court of Queen's Bench, Wall said that his real estate clients -- about half of whom belonged to Jehovah's Witness congregations -- refused to conduct business with him any longer. A judge concluded the court had jurisdiction to hear the case on the grounds that being shunned had an economic impact on Wall. The provincial Court of Appeal upheld the decision, and the congregation then took its arguments to the Supreme Court. In its decision, the high court said the purpose of judicial review is to ensure the legality of state decision-making. However, in this case, the congregational committee was not exercising statutory authority. "Private parties cannot seek judicial review to solve disputes that may arise between them." Courts may only interfere to address procedural fairness concerns about the decisions of religious groups or other voluntary associations if legal rights are at stake, Rowe wrote. Yet there was no evidence that Wall and the congregation had a contractual relationship. Finally, the decision said, it is not appropriate for the courts to make decisions about religious tenets. Wall's lawyer, Michael Feder, called the ruling disappointing because it gives religious groups and other voluntary associations "a very wide berth even though their decisions can and often do profoundly affect their members' lives." "No matter how grave the effect of the group's decision, and no matter how unfair the procedure followed, the courts cannot ordinarily interfere." David Gnam, a lawyer for the congregation, welcomed the decision, saying the Supreme Court "swept aside years of uncertainty and conflicting court decisions" on a fundamental matter.
  3. Prophecies are rarely appreciated when they are being fulfilled and is is usually after fulfillment that people recognize that a prophecy has been fulfilled. Nothing wrong with keeping on the watch, but better to not get in to debt thinking that you won't have to pay it back. We don't know the day or hour, but we can certainly discern the season. Cheers.
  4. I saw this article yesterday. Very sad. The individual attacked first had just gotten out of the automobile and was attacked at the car. The other three got out and attempted to help the first victim. Lesson to watch out. Life comes at you fast.
  5. I see nothing wrong with learning about other religions. It serves a useful purpose in helping the citizens understand other people. However, I do have a problem if the way they educate is to perform a daily act of worship in that religion. After all, it is possible to learn about a religion without participating. We learn about ancient Aztec religion by reading about it, not performing a human sacrifice.
  6. When you read the entire article you find the answer is yes. Basically, follow the rules, dress appropriately, and have a pleasant demeanor.
  7. So, after reading the source document it appears that she is very active in black lives matter and seems to believe that mankind has the ability to solve our problems. She may be right in that mankind has the ability, what they don't have is the will to facilitate solutions. People from all political stripes seem to be more interested in their pet causes or positions and no path of compromise is available to enact real and lasting change. Only God's kingdom has the ability to enact real and lasting change that will benefit everybody. Even pain and death will be done away with. No political movement by mankind has that ability.
  8. Fore gleam of what the future holds. The whole world in in the power of the wicked one and only Jehovah's king can free us from his evil activities.
  9. She stated that in the past the parents organized the parties.
  10. David Normand

    What Does the Bible Say About Dinosaurs?

    *** g90 2/8 pp. 3-5 Discovering ‘The Great Reptiles’ of the Past * The Genesis Account and Dinosaurs While the radioactive dating method is innovative, it is still based on speculation and assumption. In contrast, the Bible account in the first chapter of Genesis simply states the general order of creation. It allows for possibly thousands of millions of years for the formation of the earth and many millenniums in six creative eras, or “days,” to prepare the earth for human habitation. Some dinosaurs (and pterosaurs) may indeed have been created in the fifth era listed in Genesis, when the Bible says that God made “flying creatures” and “great sea monsters.” Perhaps other types of dinosaurs were created in the sixth epoch. The vast array of dinosaurs with their huge appetites would have been appropriate considering the abundant vegetation that evidently existed in their time.—Genesis 1:20-24. When the dinosaurs had fulfilled their purpose, God ended their life. But the Bible is silent on how he did that or when. We can be sure that dinosaurs were created by Jehovah for a purpose, even if we do not fully understand that purpose at this time. They were no mistake, no product of evolution. That they suddenly appear in the fossil record unconnected to any fossil ancestors, and also disappear without leaving connecting fossil links, is evidence against the view that such animals gradually evolved over millions of years of time. Thus, the fossil record does not support the evolution theory. Instead, it harmonizes with the Bible’s view of creative acts of God.
  11. What are you talking about? There was no mention that she was teaching them religion nor was she asking them to observe her religious views. If they wanted to have a Valentine Day party they were free to do so as they have done so in the past and it was organized by the student's parents. In this case the principal asked her to organize the party and she refused.
  12. David Normand

    JW's are not "chained" to their religion.

    you might be considered a cult if you punish people for leaving the group. Teaching or trying to persuade members of the group that the information from the faithful and discrete slave is wrong or misleading I can understand, but nobody should be punished for leaving the group of their own volition.
  13. David Normand

    Women Being Used To Do Roving Microphones ?

    This entire position of not using sisters because they might be put in a position to give brothers direction and violate scripture is just silly. When Paul commented about women instructing brothers he was specifically talking about in the meeting where brothers were supposed to take the lead. I mean really, what is wrong with sisters working behind the literature counter, handling microphones, directing traffic, or even directing friends to their seats. Oh well, times are changing.
  14. David Normand

    Poison Tacos?

    " Be Careful Brothers and Sisters " .... Caution !!! Matthew 10:16... Look, I am sending you out as sheep among wolves so prove yourselves cautious as serpents and yet innocent as doves." Love you all Good advice surly. However, this particular story does not ring true. Mainly because of the implication that the angels and by extension Jehovah caused the death of the innocent person perhaps to teach her a lesson. Though there is no doubt that in Bible times Jehovah via the angels directly interacted with his servants on numerous occasions. Not sure Jehovah would do that today without giving clear warning about what he was doing. Second, there are many examples where Jehovah's people in modern were adversely impacted by people because they were witnesses. Think back to the second world war. In most of those instances Jehovah did not step in and thwart the agent of harm in such a way as to cause harm to somebody else. Don't misunderstand me on this point. Jehovah can and I am sure he does interact in our behalf when his act furthers his purpose, but in most cases his purposes is not impacted at all. There is no evidence in the example above that what these sisters were doing was so important and that the poison tacos being eaten by the woman's son was related to Jehovah's purpose. Could be, but based upon the information provided it is doubtful. This really seems like a story contrived by somebody to stir appreciation for Jehovah in some way, but sadly the likely result if it were shared outside of Jehovah's organization would be to heap scorn and ridicule upon Jehovah and his organization due to the fanciful nature of the story.
  15. I can see that. People are generally wary of information gathered about them and want to make sure it is not being used for nefarious purposes. I suspect the word will filter down that taking notes about a visit or not is up to you and if you so decide to take notes about a visit use your own paper. That being said I do recall a pioneer who after return visits would take out a paper and pen and in front of the householder would state that he was taking a brief of the visit and the question he left him with. I do not recall anybody ever objecting to him making notes in that fashion. Of course, that was back in the 80's. Times have changed since then.
×

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation