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Isabella

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  1. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Patiently waiting for Truth in Jehovah's Witnesses to join redress scheme   
    Authorities are urging the Jehovah's Witnesses to contact them to get the ball rolling on the religious group's decision to join the national redress scheme for child sexual abuse survivors.
    The organisation says it will sign up because of new rules introduced by the federal government, which mean it would lose its charity status - and subsequent tax exemptions - for continuing to hold out.
    "Now that the law requires charities to join the scheme, Jehovah's Witnesses will comply," it said in a statement to AAP on Wednesday.
    "Jehovah's Witnesses believe that it is their responsibility before God to respect and co-operate with the authorities."
    A spokeswoman for Social Services Minister Anne Ruston has welcomed the statement but implored the organisation to contact authorities.
    "(We) encourage them to make urgent contact with the Department of Social Services so they can make good on this commitment," she told AAP.
    "It can take up to six months for institutions to complete the process of joining and the department would hope to work co-operatively and with haste to facilitate the Jehovah's Witnesses joining as quickly as possible.
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  2. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Srecko Sostar in Jehovah's Witnesses to join redress scheme   
    Authorities are urging the Jehovah's Witnesses to contact them to get the ball rolling on the religious group's decision to join the national redress scheme for child sexual abuse survivors.
    The organisation says it will sign up because of new rules introduced by the federal government, which mean it would lose its charity status - and subsequent tax exemptions - for continuing to hold out.
    "Now that the law requires charities to join the scheme, Jehovah's Witnesses will comply," it said in a statement to AAP on Wednesday.
    "Jehovah's Witnesses believe that it is their responsibility before God to respect and co-operate with the authorities."
    A spokeswoman for Social Services Minister Anne Ruston has welcomed the statement but implored the organisation to contact authorities.
    "(We) encourage them to make urgent contact with the Department of Social Services so they can make good on this commitment," she told AAP.
    "It can take up to six months for institutions to complete the process of joining and the department would hope to work co-operatively and with haste to facilitate the Jehovah's Witnesses joining as quickly as possible.
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  3. Upvote
    Isabella reacted to admin in Vancouver Mall, Vancouver, WA 2021   
    It wasn't "dead" like some malls out there.... I went in for Visionworks..... but I did notice the food court and theatre's appeared dead compared to previous decades.
    Seeing the demise of malls in general causes a certain sadness considering how important a part of everyday life it was back in the 80's and 90's
  4. Upvote
    Isabella reacted to The Librarian in Abel: How old when killed?   
    Interesting concept I haven't thought of before. 
    And also the wondering of how many other subsequent? brothers and sisters were interbreeding for the next couple of centuries. 
  5. Haha
    Isabella reacted to admin in Nine Important Facts   
  6. Like
    Isabella reacted to The Librarian in Dear Librarian: What Type of Wine is Appropriate for the Memorial?   
    Answer: The Memorial wine  is a plain red wine , without any additives, or fortifications. Fermented red grape juice ONLY

     
    Often winemakers are not transparent about what they add to their wine. Most people don't realize that their fancy Cabernet Sauvignon has actually been treated with all kinds of chemicals.
    FYI: @JW Insider actually made an interesting comment last year concerning our buying only Passover or Kosher wines here
    Agape!
    @The Librarian
  7. Like
    Isabella reacted to admin in Burgerim in Camas, WA   
  8. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Joan Kennedy in Another Jehovah's Witness Placed Under House Arrest In Russia After Search Of Homes   
    Russian authorities have detained and placed under house arrest a Jehovah’s Witness in Siberia amid a continued crackdown on the religious group, which was labeled as extremist and banned in the country in 2017.
    The Investigative Committee said in a statement on February 17 that a 53-year-old resident of the town of Belovo in the Kemerovo region was placed under house arrest on suspicion of organizing a Jehovah’s Witnesses "cell."
    The man, whose identity was not disclosed, refused to cooperate with investigators citing Article 51 of the Russian Constitution, the statement said, adding that the suspect had been apprehended after the homes of several alleged members of the banned group were searched in the region.
    Article 51 states that no one shall be obliged to give incriminating evidence.
    The announcement came a week after a court in Russia's Krasnodar region sentenced a 63-year-old Jehovah's Witness, Aleksandr Ivshin, to 7 1/2 years in prison, the harshest sentence since authorities launched the campaign against the religious group.
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  9. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Joan Kennedy in How the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ American Sign Language Bible is ‘touching hearts’ in Utah   
    Robert Faircourt has been deaf since childhood, and American Sign Language is his primary language.
    While he learned English in school, reading and understanding the Bible has always been a challenge for the 74-year-old from West Valley City, who was baptized as a Jehovah’s Witness in 1969. Over the years, he has longed for a deeper connection with teachings of the Bible.
    Faircourt’s prayers were answered one year ago as the Jehovah’s Witnesses released what the church believes is the first complete Bible in American Sign Language, a text-to-video translation project that took more than 15 years to complete.
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  10. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Joan Kennedy in RUSSIA: Early release applications denied   
    Six Jehovah's Witnesses jailed on "extremism"-related charges applied for early release after serving half their jail terms, but have been unsuccessful. Prison administrations opposed the applications with what Jehovah's Witnesses describe as "fabricated evidence" of violations of prison rules. Four of the prisoners were accused of smoking in the wrong place, but Jehovah's Witnesses do not smoke. Another Jehovah's Witness jailed since 2018 and a Muslim reader of Nursi's works jailed since 2017 should both become eligible to apply in summer 2021.
    Six Jehovah's Witnesses jailed on "extremism"-related charges for exercising their right to freedom of religion or belief have so far failed in their applications for early release. On the fourth attempt, a court commuted the rest of Dennis Christensen's jail term to a fine, but this was overturned after prosecutors appealed and he remains in jail. Four jailed Jehovah's Witnesses from Saratov have similarly failed in their appeals for early release, while a fifth is still awaiting a hearing. Read more: Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
  11. Upvote
    Isabella got a reaction from Kick_Faceinator in Child abuse survivor slams government’s 8-year extension of national redress scheme deadline   
    The federal government has given institutions named and shamed in the royal commission into child sexual abuse an extra eight years to sign up to the national redress scheme.
    It is the second time the deadline has been extended, this time until 2028, a transcript of the parliamentary inquiry into the operation of the scheme shows.
    An independent review of the scheme is due to be finished by the end of February which should canvass issues that include further ways to ensure institutions join the scheme.
    Of the 158 institutions mentioned at the royal commission, three have not flagged their intention to join.
    A further 16 have said they are intending to join but have not yet signed up, and there are 11 institutions that have been assessed as “unable to meet the legislative requirements”.
    The Jehovah’s Witnesses is the only national organisation to declare they will not be joining.
    Jehovah’s Witnesses abuse survivor and advocate Lara Kaput said it felt like the government was “buying themselves time” while they decide how to handle institutions who have not signed up.
    “There is no clear government strategy to make the Jehovah’s Witness leaders accountable that has been shared with survivors,” she said.
    Full article: 
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  12. Like
    Isabella got a reaction from Joan Kennedy in Faith overcame fear for these grateful new parents of twins   
    After 12 years of marriage, pregnancy was a surprise. Friends and family have helped in the midst of the pandemic.
    Hadassah and Tabitha were born at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle on June 24. They arrived three weeks early, delivered by cesarean, both weighing 5 pounds, 13 ounces. Today, the Flores home in the Lowell neighborhood is filled with all the joys and coos, hungry cries and wakeful nights that not one but two babies bring.
    Flores, 35, said that in sharing their story she hopes to let others know what helped them through fears of the virus, a higher-than-average-risk pregnancy and economic uncertainty.
    Both she and her husband are Jehovah’s Witnesses, and members of a Spanish-speaking congregation that meets at the Kingdom Hall on Everett’s Madison Street. Before coronavirus restrictions, they met every Sunday and Wednesday. Together, they also shared their faith through door-to-door visits, going out weekly.
    All that had stopped by late February 2020, after the governing body of Jehovah’s Witnesses closed assembly halls and halted in-contact preaching. “We quickly understood this was very serious,” she wrote. And by the time she was 6 months pregnant, she had also stopped in-person visits with friends and family.
    Hector Flores, now back on the job with a window and door company, was furloughed for three months starting last March. And Marisol, who had worked cleaning apartments in Seattle, was no longer able to do that. Savings they had for their growing family dwindled.
    With money tight and their spiritual routine interrupted, they turned even more to faith.
    Soon, they were joining weekly meetings of their congregation online via Zoom. Rather than going door to door, they preached biblical messages through letter writing and by phone.
    “Although our situation seemed dire, I was happy to have my husband at home keeping me company and helping me with the many, many things I could no longer do,” she said. “I was happy to see our friends from the Kingdom Hall online and felt their support.”
    Reading and sharing Scripture “made me feel uplifted and courageous,” said Flores, whose family came to the United States from Mexico when she was 6.
    In these worrisome times, she believes others may find comfort where she finds it, in the Bible — especially the Book of James, 4:8. It says, “Draw close to God, and he will draw close to you.”
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  13. Upvote
    Isabella got a reaction from Patiently waiting for Truth in Child abuse survivor slams government’s 8-year extension of national redress scheme deadline   
    The federal government has given institutions named and shamed in the royal commission into child sexual abuse an extra eight years to sign up to the national redress scheme.
    It is the second time the deadline has been extended, this time until 2028, a transcript of the parliamentary inquiry into the operation of the scheme shows.
    An independent review of the scheme is due to be finished by the end of February which should canvass issues that include further ways to ensure institutions join the scheme.
    Of the 158 institutions mentioned at the royal commission, three have not flagged their intention to join.
    A further 16 have said they are intending to join but have not yet signed up, and there are 11 institutions that have been assessed as “unable to meet the legislative requirements”.
    The Jehovah’s Witnesses is the only national organisation to declare they will not be joining.
    Jehovah’s Witnesses abuse survivor and advocate Lara Kaput said it felt like the government was “buying themselves time” while they decide how to handle institutions who have not signed up.
    “There is no clear government strategy to make the Jehovah’s Witness leaders accountable that has been shared with survivors,” she said.
    Full article: 
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  14. Downvote
    Isabella got a reaction from César Chávez in As A Kid I Was Told Armageddon Was Near, So I Wouldn’t Need A Job. Now I’m A BDSM Model.   
    “I was told I’d stop aging and I’d be a teenager forever. I didn’t think I’d ever earn money for myself, have a bank account, own a home, fall in love, get married.”

    The author at age 11 in a 1988 school photo. “I was expecting the world to end in five years maximum,” she says.
    My teacher, having asked everyone who got 10 out of 10 right on the spelling test to put their hand up, went on to ask who got 9 out of 10. She proceeded from there, down to 4 out of 10. I put my hand up. I actually got 1 out of 10, but didn’t want to admit I didn’t study for the test. She wouldn’t have understood why.
    I was 9 years old and I wasn’t going to grow up. I didn’t need to learn to spell because I’d never need a job. It was 1986, my family were Jehovah’s Witnesses, and the JW governing body was confidently predicting that Armageddon would arrive by the mid-1990s. Everyone who survived that would live forever in Paradise on earth. We were promised this at each of the thrice-weekly meetings we attended. In Paradise, we’d build log cabins, make friends with wild animals and spend our time picking fruit with other Jehovah’s Witnesses. This was all lovingly illustrated for us in the Jehovah’s Witness literature.
    I tried to suppress the panic I felt whenever I perused the pictures. To me, it looked boring ― because it was going to last forever. I had many opportunities to consider forever, sitting on a plastic chair under fluorescent lights, during the interminable Jehovah’s Witness meetings. Forever meant that eventually, the whole world would be so familiar to me that there would be no wonders left. One day I would have had every possible conversation with every single person still alive on the planet. It gave me a feeling like vertigo. So I told myself to trust what I was learning because if everyone else wanted to live forever, it would surely somehow be marvelous, and a more-than-ample reward for all the activities we missed out on in the present-day world.
    There were plenty of those. No Christmas, no birthdays, no Easter. Technically, Jehovah’s Witnesses were allowed televisions, but we were warned frequently about “worldly influences” and my parents had elected not to have one. Higher education was frowned upon ― it was considered selfish not to use all your available time and energy trying to convert nonbelievers, so as to save their lives during Armageddon. Many young JWs left school as soon as legally allowed, took low-paying jobs, and spent all of their spare time and energy evangelizing, or “storing up treasures in heaven.” I banked on Armageddon coming quickly enough to save me from having to become a window cleaner. I was keen for it to arrive before I turned 16. This, the JW literature assured me, was almost certain.
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  15. Thanks
    Isabella got a reaction from Joan Kennedy in Eritrea: Seventy Christians released from three prisons   
    Christian Solidarity Worldwide has been informed that 70 Christians from evangelical and orthodox backgrounds were recently released from three prisons in Eritrea.
    On 1 February, 21 female and 43 male prisoners were released from Mai Serwa and Adi Abeito prisons, close to the capital city, Asmara. The prisoners had been held without charge or trial for periods of between two and 12 years.
    On 27 January, six female prisoners who were detained in September 2020 in Dekemhare, south-east of Asmara, were also released. The women were arrested after worshipping in public as they were walking down a street, an event which was caught on camera and circulated via social media.
    While the releases have been warmly welcomed, there is also speculation that they mark the latest effort by the Eritrean regime to distract international attention from the country's active role in the ongoing war in Ethiopia's Tigray region, where Eritrean troops have been accused of violence which may amount to crimes against humanity, war crimes and possibly genocide.
    On 4 December 2020, the government released 24 Jehovah's Witnesses, including the high-profile conscientious objectors Paulos Eyasu, Isaac Mogos and Negede Teklemariam, who had been held for 26 years, and whose cases were highlighted by the former UN Special Rapporteur on Eritrea in her final statement to the UN Third Committee in New York in October 2020.
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  16. Upvote
    Isabella got a reaction from Patiently waiting for Truth in As A Kid I Was Told Armageddon Was Near, So I Wouldn’t Need A Job. Now I’m A BDSM Model.   
    “I was told I’d stop aging and I’d be a teenager forever. I didn’t think I’d ever earn money for myself, have a bank account, own a home, fall in love, get married.”

    The author at age 11 in a 1988 school photo. “I was expecting the world to end in five years maximum,” she says.
    My teacher, having asked everyone who got 10 out of 10 right on the spelling test to put their hand up, went on to ask who got 9 out of 10. She proceeded from there, down to 4 out of 10. I put my hand up. I actually got 1 out of 10, but didn’t want to admit I didn’t study for the test. She wouldn’t have understood why.
    I was 9 years old and I wasn’t going to grow up. I didn’t need to learn to spell because I’d never need a job. It was 1986, my family were Jehovah’s Witnesses, and the JW governing body was confidently predicting that Armageddon would arrive by the mid-1990s. Everyone who survived that would live forever in Paradise on earth. We were promised this at each of the thrice-weekly meetings we attended. In Paradise, we’d build log cabins, make friends with wild animals and spend our time picking fruit with other Jehovah’s Witnesses. This was all lovingly illustrated for us in the Jehovah’s Witness literature.
    I tried to suppress the panic I felt whenever I perused the pictures. To me, it looked boring ― because it was going to last forever. I had many opportunities to consider forever, sitting on a plastic chair under fluorescent lights, during the interminable Jehovah’s Witness meetings. Forever meant that eventually, the whole world would be so familiar to me that there would be no wonders left. One day I would have had every possible conversation with every single person still alive on the planet. It gave me a feeling like vertigo. So I told myself to trust what I was learning because if everyone else wanted to live forever, it would surely somehow be marvelous, and a more-than-ample reward for all the activities we missed out on in the present-day world.
    There were plenty of those. No Christmas, no birthdays, no Easter. Technically, Jehovah’s Witnesses were allowed televisions, but we were warned frequently about “worldly influences” and my parents had elected not to have one. Higher education was frowned upon ― it was considered selfish not to use all your available time and energy trying to convert nonbelievers, so as to save their lives during Armageddon. Many young JWs left school as soon as legally allowed, took low-paying jobs, and spent all of their spare time and energy evangelizing, or “storing up treasures in heaven.” I banked on Armageddon coming quickly enough to save me from having to become a window cleaner. I was keen for it to arrive before I turned 16. This, the JW literature assured me, was almost certain.
    Read more: 
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  17. Upvote
    Isabella got a reaction from Kick_Faceinator in As A Kid I Was Told Armageddon Was Near, So I Wouldn’t Need A Job. Now I’m A BDSM Model.   
    “I was told I’d stop aging and I’d be a teenager forever. I didn’t think I’d ever earn money for myself, have a bank account, own a home, fall in love, get married.”

    The author at age 11 in a 1988 school photo. “I was expecting the world to end in five years maximum,” she says.
    My teacher, having asked everyone who got 10 out of 10 right on the spelling test to put their hand up, went on to ask who got 9 out of 10. She proceeded from there, down to 4 out of 10. I put my hand up. I actually got 1 out of 10, but didn’t want to admit I didn’t study for the test. She wouldn’t have understood why.
    I was 9 years old and I wasn’t going to grow up. I didn’t need to learn to spell because I’d never need a job. It was 1986, my family were Jehovah’s Witnesses, and the JW governing body was confidently predicting that Armageddon would arrive by the mid-1990s. Everyone who survived that would live forever in Paradise on earth. We were promised this at each of the thrice-weekly meetings we attended. In Paradise, we’d build log cabins, make friends with wild animals and spend our time picking fruit with other Jehovah’s Witnesses. This was all lovingly illustrated for us in the Jehovah’s Witness literature.
    I tried to suppress the panic I felt whenever I perused the pictures. To me, it looked boring ― because it was going to last forever. I had many opportunities to consider forever, sitting on a plastic chair under fluorescent lights, during the interminable Jehovah’s Witness meetings. Forever meant that eventually, the whole world would be so familiar to me that there would be no wonders left. One day I would have had every possible conversation with every single person still alive on the planet. It gave me a feeling like vertigo. So I told myself to trust what I was learning because if everyone else wanted to live forever, it would surely somehow be marvelous, and a more-than-ample reward for all the activities we missed out on in the present-day world.
    There were plenty of those. No Christmas, no birthdays, no Easter. Technically, Jehovah’s Witnesses were allowed televisions, but we were warned frequently about “worldly influences” and my parents had elected not to have one. Higher education was frowned upon ― it was considered selfish not to use all your available time and energy trying to convert nonbelievers, so as to save their lives during Armageddon. Many young JWs left school as soon as legally allowed, took low-paying jobs, and spent all of their spare time and energy evangelizing, or “storing up treasures in heaven.” I banked on Armageddon coming quickly enough to save me from having to become a window cleaner. I was keen for it to arrive before I turned 16. This, the JW literature assured me, was almost certain.
    Read more: 
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  18. Confused
    Isabella got a reaction from The Librarian in As A Kid I Was Told Armageddon Was Near, So I Wouldn’t Need A Job. Now I’m A BDSM Model.   
    “I was told I’d stop aging and I’d be a teenager forever. I didn’t think I’d ever earn money for myself, have a bank account, own a home, fall in love, get married.”

    The author at age 11 in a 1988 school photo. “I was expecting the world to end in five years maximum,” she says.
    My teacher, having asked everyone who got 10 out of 10 right on the spelling test to put their hand up, went on to ask who got 9 out of 10. She proceeded from there, down to 4 out of 10. I put my hand up. I actually got 1 out of 10, but didn’t want to admit I didn’t study for the test. She wouldn’t have understood why.
    I was 9 years old and I wasn’t going to grow up. I didn’t need to learn to spell because I’d never need a job. It was 1986, my family were Jehovah’s Witnesses, and the JW governing body was confidently predicting that Armageddon would arrive by the mid-1990s. Everyone who survived that would live forever in Paradise on earth. We were promised this at each of the thrice-weekly meetings we attended. In Paradise, we’d build log cabins, make friends with wild animals and spend our time picking fruit with other Jehovah’s Witnesses. This was all lovingly illustrated for us in the Jehovah’s Witness literature.
    I tried to suppress the panic I felt whenever I perused the pictures. To me, it looked boring ― because it was going to last forever. I had many opportunities to consider forever, sitting on a plastic chair under fluorescent lights, during the interminable Jehovah’s Witness meetings. Forever meant that eventually, the whole world would be so familiar to me that there would be no wonders left. One day I would have had every possible conversation with every single person still alive on the planet. It gave me a feeling like vertigo. So I told myself to trust what I was learning because if everyone else wanted to live forever, it would surely somehow be marvelous, and a more-than-ample reward for all the activities we missed out on in the present-day world.
    There were plenty of those. No Christmas, no birthdays, no Easter. Technically, Jehovah’s Witnesses were allowed televisions, but we were warned frequently about “worldly influences” and my parents had elected not to have one. Higher education was frowned upon ― it was considered selfish not to use all your available time and energy trying to convert nonbelievers, so as to save their lives during Armageddon. Many young JWs left school as soon as legally allowed, took low-paying jobs, and spent all of their spare time and energy evangelizing, or “storing up treasures in heaven.” I banked on Armageddon coming quickly enough to save me from having to become a window cleaner. I was keen for it to arrive before I turned 16. This, the JW literature assured me, was almost certain.
    Read more: 
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  19. Haha
    Isabella reacted to xero in Field Service - YPFO (Young People Freak Out)   
    I remember a young brother who was really into hip/hop. His mother was in my book study that I was conducting and she wanted me to work with him. I knew he was skeptical of having me do my "elder thing" on him, so I didn't. I went to the first door, stood there, prayed a second and then after about a minute, he said "Aren't you gonna knock?" I said "Why? The angels are involved in the preaching work, right? So they need to do their part too. If someone comes, we'll talk, if not, then I guess it's not their time. Remember? "The reapers are angels". He said "You are one weird elder." (w/a grin)
    Later I said I was just messing w/him, but only half-way messing.
  20. Like
    Isabella got a reaction from The Librarian in Friendly February- 2021   
  21. Haha
  22. Like
    Isabella got a reaction from Kick_Faceinator in Jehovah’s Witnesses releases world’s 1st complete sign-language Bible   
    The Jehovah’s Witnesses, the organization that publishes Bible and Bible-based materials in over 1,000 languages, made history in translation when it released the first complete sign language Bible in the world.
    The app that it designed — the JW Sign Language — is downloadable for free, according to Dean Jacek, national spokesperson of Jehovah’s Witnesses.
    The app also contains portions of the Bible in 90 other sign language translations, he added.
    Described by several members of the deaf community as the “best gift during the pandemic,” the New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures contains videos of all the 66 books in American Sign Language (ASL).
     


    Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1388913/jehovahs-witnesses-release-worlds-1st-complete-sign-language-bible#ixzz6kuOxkSrX
    Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

  23. Upvote
    Isabella got a reaction from Jack Ryan in México: Call center de Testigos de Jehová   
    Los testigo de Jehová en México ascienden a casi un millón, ante la pandemia adaptan su misión evangelizadora para evitar contagios. Son reconocidos por su labor permanente de puerta en puerta en los domicilios para predicar la Biblia, no obstente, cambiaron su dinámica evangelizadora y ahora realizan llamadas telefónicas al azar a través de un call center y reparten  cartas “con mensajes de aliento” por debajo de las puertas.
    También suspendieron las congregaciones, donde se reunían más de 150 personas, mínimo dos veces por semana; ahora son a través de Zoom.
    En palabras de Josué Zañudo, representante de la Sección de Información de la Congregación Cristiana de los Testigos de Jehová en México: “Nuestra predicación, que antes hacíamos en los domicilios, ahora la ejercemos mediante llamadas telefónicas y con cartas a través de un mensaje breve, pero a la vez animador, para entregar a nuestros vecinos y así no hay ningún riesgo (…) Hemos sentido que, sobre todo en estos tiempos de pandemia, la gente sí agradece las llamadas, las cartas; algunos han perdido seres queridos y las palabras de la Biblia les han caído muy reconfortantes”.

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  24. Sad
    Isabella got a reaction from Jack Ryan in Un joven de Puerto Rico se quitó la vida y familiares responsabilizan a una iglesia por discriminarlo y hostigarlo Twitter Facebook   
    Un joven de 28 años apareció sin vida en su departamento de Puerto Rico y todo apunta a que se trató de un suicidio. Familiares de la víctima aseguran que el muchacho padecía una persecución por parte de Testigos de Jehová, culto del cual participaba pero que luego decidió apartarse. 

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  25. Sad
    Isabella got a reaction from Money & Finance in Un joven de Puerto Rico se quitó la vida y familiares responsabilizan a una iglesia por discriminarlo y hostigarlo Twitter Facebook   
    Un joven de 28 años apareció sin vida en su departamento de Puerto Rico y todo apunta a que se trató de un suicidio. Familiares de la víctima aseguran que el muchacho padecía una persecución por parte de Testigos de Jehová, culto del cual participaba pero que luego decidió apartarse. 

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