Nicole

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Nicole last won the day on January 17

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  1. Nos quedamos solos como cada noche hoy te siento triste y se muy bien por qué. tu querrás decirme que he cambiado mucho que el amor se acaba y quiero terminar. Yo que ni un momento puedo estar lejos de ti. cómo soportar la vida entera ya sin ti te quiero, te quiero, te juro que yo no puedo vivir sin tu amor. Ven aquí, abrázame, yo te amo tanto y te pido por favor que creas más en mi. Yo que ni un momento puedo estar lejos de ti, cómo soportar la vida entera ya sin ti. te quiero, te quiero yo que ni un momento puedo estar lejos de ti, cómo soportar la vida entera ya sin ti. te quiero, te quiero, te quiero, te quiero.
  2. Suicide Bomber in Manchester Arena, UK

    Manchester Arena attack: Eyewitnesses describe blast horror Twenty-two people were killed in the explosion, including an eight-year-old girl. A further 59 people, including 12 under the age of 16, were injured and taken to hospital. Nick Haywood said finding his daughter Caitlin was 'like the best moment' of his life Nick Haywood, 46, from Nottingham was waiting for his 16-year-old daughter Caitlin and her friend, also 16, when the explosion happened. He said: "You could feel it, you could feel the noise. It was incredibly loud. My first thought was to find my daughter. "People were already starting to filter out. You could tell something was wrong, no-one was laughing or chatting. Some people were running, a bit of mild panic. "I was trying to get hold of them on the phone but the network was down so I made my way into the arena. Seeing her on the stairs was a huge relief. "It was like she was almost born again. It was the best moment of my life all over again." Caitlin had planned and saved up for the trip for months. She said: "We were so excited when the day came and we were listening to her music on the train. We were so excited, but it turned out to be be a bad experience. "When people said [the noise] was a balloon or a speaker, in the back of my head I knew it was a bomb and we needed to get out. "I thought the next minute people with guns were going to start coming in." She said she and her friend were near the front of the stage when the blast took place and she said people were getting crushed as they panicked and ran for the exit. "As soon as Ariana Grande left [the stage] the lights went out and the bomb went off. That made me think that this person planned it so well." Read more: Caitlin had planned and saved up for the trip for months. She said: "We were so excited when the day came and we were listening to her music on the train. We were so excited, but it turned out to be be a bad experience. "When people said [the noise] was a balloon or a speaker, in the back of my head I knew it was a bomb and we needed to get out. "I thought the next minute people with guns were going to start coming in." She said she and her friend were near the front of the stage when the blast took place and she said people were getting crushed as they panicked and ran for the exit. "As soon as Ariana Grande left [the stage] the lights went out and the bomb went off. That made me think that this person planned it so well." Read more:
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  3. The U.S. Commission in International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) sounded the alarm about the "worsening" state of affairs for religious freedom across the globe in its report for this year, the Christian News Network reported. The report, released on Wednesday last week, urges the U.S. Department of State to designate 16 more nations as Countries of Particular Concern (CPC), citing particular instances in those countries that merited their inclusion in the list. "Overall, the Commission has concluded that the state of affairs for international religious freedom is worsening in both the depth and breadth of violations," said USCIRF Chairman Thomas Reese in a statement. "The blatant assaults have become so frightening—attempted genocide, the slaughter of innocents, and wholesale destruction of places of worship—that less egregious abuses go unnoticed or at least unappreciated," he pointed out. Kristina Arriaga de Bucholz, a USCIRF member, said during a panel discussion on Wednesday in Washington D.C. that the commission "specifically name names so that those stories are lifted and people gain the strength that they need in order to continue fighting for their faith," CBN News reported. The commission urged the State Department to designate six nations—Russia, Central African Republic, Nigeria, Pakistan, Syria, and Vietnam as countries of concern. The commission blew the whistle on Russia due to worsening religious freedoms in that country, which became even more evident with the recent ban of Jehovah's Witnesses. Once again, North Korea topped the USCIRF list of countries with the most repressive regimes, noting that freedom of religion is non-existent in that communist nation. North Korea is also Number 1 on Open Doors USA's World Watch list of the top 50 Christian-persecuting countries in the world. The Commission urged both Congress and the Trump administration to continually speak up about religious freedom abuses around the world, both in public and in private meetings. "You cannot have religious freedom without the freedom of worship, the freedom of association, the freedom of expression and opinion, the freedom of assembly, protection from arbitrary arrest and detention, [and] protection from interference in home and family," the report states. Read more at
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  4. Two arrested driving SUV of missing Charlotte Uber driver. His fate is a mystery What has become of missing Charlotte Uber driver Marlo Johnis Medina-Chevez? It’s a question his family, the police and many other Charlotteans are asking as detectives continue to interrogate the two men who were arrested Monday night, using his credit card and driving his car. They were caught in Maryland. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police said at a news conference Tuesday that the fate of Medina-Chevez, 44, remains a mystery, though they believe he’s in “grave danger.” Medina-Chevez left his Charlotte home Saturday night to pick up a passenger and never returned. The case is being investigated as a homicide, though police have not said they believe he’s dead. Arrested in connection with the case are Diontray Divan Adams, 24, and James Aaron Stevens, 20, but the two are not charged with homicide. Instead, detectives have charged Adams with financial credit card fraud and outstanding Maryland warrants, and Stevens has been charged with possession of a stolen vehicle. It was not immediately clear where the two men live. The duo were arrested in Maryland, after police there began investigating a fraudulent use of Medina-Chavez’s credit card. At 11:50 p.m. Monday, CMPD detectives were notified that Maryland State Police received a license plate reader hit on Medina-Chevez’s 2008 Nissan Pathfinder. It had been spotted near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. The Maryland Transportation Authority Police then stopped the Pathfinder and detained the four occupants. Adams and Stevens were taken to the Maryland Transportation Authority Police Department in Annapolis, where they were being interviewed by CMPD homicide detectives. The other occupants were released and not charged. Court records show James Stevens lived in Fayetteville until 2014, then moved to Mecklenburg County. He has been charged twice with offenses, including an October 2016 case of communicating threats in Mecklenburg County. The outcome was not clear in court records. Court records show Diontray Adams was a Charlotte resident when he was arrested in 2105 for an offense in Rowan County. Details of that offense are not included in court records. Medina-Chevez’ family spoke at a Tuesday CMPD news conference, and said they have not given up hope. In fact, they were worried that he might be wandering around disoriented, which would explain why no one has heard from him. His daughter, Debra Medina, said finding the SUV put them a step closer to finding her father. “A car gives us hope, even if it’s just a car," she said. In an interview with the Spanish language newspaper Hola La Noticia, Elisa Urbina said her husband began working for Uber in December to raise money for a rare family vacation. It was a job he fit around his full-time work at a company making windows and doors, she told the newspaper. On Saturday evening, he left their house about 9:45 p.m. to pick up a passenger, expecting to be gone only an hour or two. “I told him not to go to work, but he insisted,” his wife told Hola La Noticia. “He told me he would only go to work for a couple of hours. He promised. He just left to pick up a passenger and, as he had not worked in the last few days, he did not want to lose his place. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police were initially handling it as a missing persons case, but it became a homicide investigation Monday afternoon. Police said the switch was in part because that unit has more resources. Medina-Chevez, a devout Jehovah’s Witnesses, was last seen in the Steele Creek area of south Charlotte. Police say they are working with Uber, but it was unclear if they knew who Medina-Chevez was picking up Saturday night. His wife told Hola La Noticia that they had been a couple since middle school, and married for more than 20 years. The two had a pledge, she said, that if one ever got lost, the other would not stop looking. “And that’s what I’ll do,” she told Hola La Noticia. “I feel like I’m not doing enough. Maybe he’s had an accident and is fighting for his life. Last night I had to leave the search because it started to rain very hard and it darkened. Today, together with some relatives we are going to go out and look for him. I will not abandon it.” Driver safety One Charlotte Uber driver said the case has made him think about his own safety. “I’ve had a couple of situations where I don’t know if ‘scary’ is the right word but ‘sketchy’ might be,” said Adam Sharkey, 25, who’s driven for Uber and competitor Lyft for three months. Weekend driving pays for his car and insurance. Two drunks headed to a strip club this past weekend passed out in his back seat, then got belligerent when Sharkey tried to get them out of the car. Another passenger started yelling accusations when Sharkey, blocked by traffic, took an alternate route. “I’ve thought about getting a knife in the name of personal defense to keep in my pocket, and seeing that (Medina-Chevez) story has made me say, maybe I’ll pick up that knife this week,” Sharkey said. “It does seem pretty unusual, but everything is unusual until it happens.” Uber said it has been working with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police investigation of the Medina-Chevez case but would not discuss specific information. Uber touts the measures the ride-hailing app takes to keep drivers safe. Among them: no anonymous passengers. Riders have to create an account and provide their name, email address and home phone number before they can request a ride. Uber also logs GPS data, so it knows who drivers are transporting and where they’re going, and both drivers and passengers can rate each other. Drivers can end rides at any time. “Our technology makes it possible to focus on the safety of drivers and passengers,” a spokeswoman said. Uber recently posted safety tips for drivers, developed with feedback from drivers and law enforcement. The online forum UberPeople.net is full of conversations among Charlotte rideshare drivers on company practices, fares and passengers. Relatively few threads discuss safety. In April, before Medina-Chevez went missing, a driver on the site compared Charlotte to “Chiraq,” a play on the war-torn Middle East, and alluded to murders, stolen guns and “doped up heartless teens and young adults.” “I feel being a Uber driver is a very vulnerable job to have right now,” he wrote. Responded a cab driver: “No, you are absolutely correct to be scared as hell. THIS cab driver got a gun pulled on him a month ago … in broad daylight over a fare discrepancy. “If (you) can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.” A third writer added: “There are risks in any job. Very few people get killed or robbed doing this job, at least not that I have heard. However, by all means stop driving if it scares you. I could use the extra passengers and surge fares.” Mark Price: 704-358-5245, @markprice_obs
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  5. Hattie Greene Watts

    Hattie Greene Watts, 88, of Wilkes County, passed away on Tuesday, May 23, 2017. She was born on Wednesday, May 15, 1929, daughter of Chilo and Martha Hamby Greene. She was a member at North Wilkesboro Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses. Those left to cherish her memory include a sister, Marie Parker of Wilkesboro; and two half-sisters, Virginia and Carol. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, May 28, 2017, at 4:00 p.m., at North Wilkesboro Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses with the Elder Christopher Absher. Visitation will follow the memorial service. Burial will be held at Scenic Memorial Garden at a later date. Condolences may be sent to www.alexfuneralservice.com.
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  6. Judicial Commitee Procedures

    What procedure does a Judicial Committee have to follow when someone confesses to a sin? Must they get it in writing? Can the person retract?
  7. Why did the elders report this crime yet have refrained in countless other child molestation crimes?
  8. Police: Missing NC Uber driver is in ‘grave danger’ CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) – An Uber driver from Charlotte, who has been missing since Saturday night, is believed to be in grave danger by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department. Investigators held a press conference Monday afternoon saying they are still investigating and “still very concerned” about 44-year-old Marlo Johnis Medina-Chevez. Based on information obtained during the investigation, officials say the case has been moved from the police department’s missing persons unit to the homicide unit. Do investigators believe the driver is dead? “I hope for the best,” said Major Cam Selvey. “I have no way of knowing what his condition is now but I go back to my statement earlier that we are gravely concerned for his well being and safety.” Police didn’t give specifics but said they’re working with Uber and cell phone providers to gather information. Medina-Chevez left for work around 9:45 p.m. Saturday and has not returned home, according to police. Investigators and his family say this is very unlike his nature. Medina-Chevez works as an Uber driver and left home to pick up a client. Medina-Chevez left home driving a 2008 dark blue Nissan Pathfinder with North Carolina tag PDV-4382, according to CMPD. He was last seen wearing a gray short sleeve shirt, jeans and sandals, police said. Medina-Chevez is described to be 5-foot-5, weighs 108 pounds and has black hair with brown eyes. Medina-Chevez’s wife of 22 years, Elsa Medina, says the family is desperate for answers. “Saturday night we come back from Kingdom Hall, because we are Jehovah’s Witnesses and our meeting is 6:30 to 8:30, and we come back and we sit on the sofa and eat together,” Elsa Medina said. “And he said, ‘let me make Uber for two hours,’ and I say, ‘don’t go. I don’t want to stay alone home.’ My daughter was doing something with friends and I didn’t want to stay home alone.” She said Medina-Chevez said it would only be two hours and she finally agreed. She said her husband left at 9:30 p.m. and she texted him 15 minutes later, but she never got a response. Elsa Medina said her husband normally drives near their home, but texts when he has to go further away. She said her daughter, Debora Medina, has tried to contact Uber for information. “They say the information is private, and my daughter says, ‘It’s my dad is missing. He make Uber last night.” And they say, ‘I call you back, or do you have a paper from the police report?’ We don’t have anything.” A spokesperson for Uber told WBTV that the company takes “very seriously” reports of drivers’ safety. She said Uber is working with police, and that there’s a legal process investigators have to complete and then give it to Uber. Customers book trips using the Uber App. The company said trips are GPS tracked. Elsa Medina said police have told her they have a lot of people working to find her husband, but don’t have much information. “I’m feeling die, I’m feeling sad, I’m feeling terrible,” she said while crying. “I say to people, ‘please help me to find my husband, he’s a good guy. He helps people. He’s very nice.'” She added that her husband has told her in the past he likes driving for Uber, and feels safe doing it. Debora Medina, the driver’s daughter, said they have gone out looking for her father or even his vehicle. “Yesterday night we were going everywhere – NoDa, Plaza Midwood, uptown – anywhere you can think of, just the popular area that would be Uber, that pick up people, the area he would say would go red just to say a lot of Ubering happening there, where bars are, the clubs – he would pick them up,” the daughter said. She said it’s very unusual for him to not come home, and that the family just wants her father home. “I think it’s unusual because he’s not the person to just leave. If he does come late to the house, he calls or text messages, send out something to let us know why he’s not home,” she said. “He’s a person based on family, he loves his family and his friends. I mean he wouldn’t just leave, you know?” She said a group is going out to hang up fliers in hopes someone with information will come forward. She is asking the community to help. “I’d like the community to come together and try to find my dad,” Debora Medina said. “I mean, he’s a loving man, he tells a lot of jokes and he gives back to his community. He helps out a lot of people. He likes to bring a lot of people into the house and help them get on their feet. I want my dad home.” If you have any information regarding Medina-Chevez’s whereabouts, you’re asked to call 9-1-1 immediately or Crime Stoppers at 704-334-1600. Copyright 2017 WBTV. All rights reserved.
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  9. CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) - An Uber driver from Charlotte, who has been missing since Saturday night, is believed to be in grave danger by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department. Investigators held a press conference Monday afternoon saying they are still investigating and "still very concerned" about 44-year-old Marlo Johnis Medina-Chevez. Based on information obtained during the investigation, officials say the case has been moved from the police department's missing persons unit to the homicide unit. Do investigators believe the driver is dead? "I hope for the best," said Major Cam Selvey. "I have no way of knowing what his condition is now but I go back to my statement earlier that we are gravely concerned for his well being and safety.” Police didn't give specifics but said they're working with Uber and cell phone providers to gather information. Medina-Chevez left for work around 9:45 p.m. Saturday and has not returned home, according to police. Investigators and his family say this is very unlike his nature. Medina-Chevez works as an Uber driver and left home to pick up a client. Medina-Chevez left home driving a 2008 dark blue Nissan Pathfinder with North Carolina tag PDV-4382, according to CMPD. He was last seen wearing a gray short sleeve shirt, jeans and sandals, police said. Medina-Chevez is described to be 5-foot-five, weighs 108 pounds and has black hair with black eyes. Medina-Chevez's wife of 22 years, Elsa Medina, says the family is desperate for answers. "Saturday night we come back from Kingdom Hall, because we are Jehovah's Witnesses and our meeting is 6:30 to 8:30, and we come back and we sit on the sofa and eat together," Elsa Medina said. "And he said, 'let me make Uber for two hours,' and I say, 'don’t go. I don’t want to stay alone home.' My daughter was doing something with friends and I didn’t want to stay home alone." She said Medina-Chevez said it would only be two hours and she finally agreed. She said her husband left at 9:30 p.m. and she texted him 15 minutes later, but she never got a response. Elsa Medina said her husband normally drives near their home, but texts when he has to go further away. She said her daughter, Debora Medina, has tried to contact Uber for information. "They say the information is private, and my daughter says, 'It’s my dad is missing. He make Uber last night." And they say, 'I call you back, or do you have a paper from the police report?' We don’t have anything." A spokesperson for Uber told WBTV that the company takes "very seriously" reports of drivers' safety. She said Uber is working with police, and that there's a legal process investigators have to complete and then give it to Uber. Customers book trips using the Uber App. The company said trips are GPS tracked. Elsa Medina said police have told her they have a lot of people working to find her husband, but don't have much information. "I’m feeling die, I’m feeling sad, I’m feeling terrible," she said while crying. "I say to people, 'please help me to find my husband, he’s a good guy. He helps people. He’s very nice.'" She added that her husband has told her in the past he likes driving for Uber, and feels safe doing it. Debora Medina, the driver's daughter, said they have gone out looking for her father or even his vehicle. "Yesterday night we were going everywhere – NoDa, Plaza Midwood, uptown – anywhere you can think of, just the popular area that would be Uber, that pick up people, the area he would say would go red just to say a lot of Ubering happening there, where bars are, the clubs – he would pick them up," the daughter said. She said it's very unusual for him to not come home, and that the family just wants her father home. "I think it’s unusual because he’s not the person to just leave. If he does come late to the house, he calls or text messages, send out something to let us know why he’s not home," she said. "He’s a person based on family, he loves his family and his friends. I mean he wouldn’t just leave, you know?" She said a group is going out to hang up fliers in hopes someone with information will come forward. She is asking the community to help. "I’d like the community to come together and try to find my dad," Debora Medina said. "I mean, he’s a loving man, he tells a lot of jokes and he gives back to his community. He helps out a lot of people. He likes to bring a lot of people into the house and help them get on their feet. I want my dad home." If you have any information regarding Medina-Chevez's whereabouts, you're asked to call 9-1-1 immediately or Crime Stoppers at 704-334-1600.
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  10. SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. - Warrants claim a North Georgia nurse accused of inappropriately touching women under anesthesia injected at least one of them with a potent drug to keep her under sedation for a longer than necessary period of time. Sandy Springs Police arrested Michael Morgan, 33, after they said he admitted to touching the women while they were unconscious at the gastroenterology practice where he worked earlier this year. Police said Morgan confided in his pastors at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, and they turned him into detectives. According to warrants obtained by Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik, "Mr. Morgan admitted to taking a used plunger of Propofol from a medical trash pile that had not been used all the way. He then took a saline flush and added it to the used Propofol plunge so he could keep her under sedation."
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  11. Tetragrammaton

    This looks like an amulet
  12. Was Jesus a minimalist?

    Was Jesus a minimalist?
  13. Gemme spirituali Geremia 44-48 Ger 48:13 — Perché i moabiti ‘si sarebbero vergognati di Chemos’? (it-1 468) CHEMOS (Chèmos). Principale divinità dei moabiti, che sono chiamati “il popolo di Chemos”. (Nu 21:29; Ger 48:46) Alcuni studiosi identificano questa divinità col Baal di Peor per via della relazione di quest’ultimo con i moabiti. (Nu 25:1-3) Anche se non era una consuetudine, è probabile che almeno in casi di estrema tensione bambini fossero immolati a Chemos. — 2Re 3:26, 27…….. ……. A quanto pare l’adorazione di Chemos fu introdotta in Israele durante il regno di Salomone. Senza dubbio sotto l’influenza delle mogli moabite, Salomone edificò un alto luogo a Chemos “sul monte che era di fronte a Gerusalemme”. (1Re 11:1, 7, 8, 33) Durante l’estesa riforma religiosa di Giosia, oltre tre secoli più tardi, questo alto luogo fu reso non idoneo all’adorazione. — 2Re 23:13. Nel predire la calamità di Moab, il profeta Geremia indicò che Chemos, il dio principale di quella nazione, come pure i suoi sacerdoti e principi sarebbero andati in esilio. I moabiti si sarebbero vergognati del loro dio a motivo della sua impotenza, come gli israeliti del regno delle dieci tribù si erano vergognati di Betel, probabilmente a motivo dell’adorazione del vitello. — Ger 48:7, 13, 46. Ger 48:42 — Perché la dichiarazione di Geova contro Moab rafforza la nostra fede? (it-2 305 par. 4) Non si può negare l’accurato adempimento delle profezie relative a Moab. Molti secoli fa i moabiti cessarono di esistere come popolo. (Ger 48:42) Oggi quelle che si pensa fossero città moabite come Nebo, Esbon, Aroer, Bet-Gamul e Baal-Meon non sono che rovine. Molti altri luoghi sono ora sconosciuti. Geremia 44-48.pdf