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Money & Finance

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  1. Amazon's HQ2 plans came into focus (aka there will be two HQ2s). Per a NYT report, which two cities are the leading contenders? Must be specific for full credit.
  2. Netflix (-2.93%) and Warner Bros. are being sued by The Satanic Temple for $150 million for using a statue of a satanic god in "The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina."
  3. Volkswagen reportedly plans to sell its own electric car for less than $23,000, per Reuters.
  4. Turns out, YouTube is used for more than just watching Zion Williamson mixtapes. A new study from Pew digs into the habits and motivations of YouTube users, with fascinating conclusions. Here are some takeaways... DIY: 51% of U.S. adults who use YouTube say the videos are "very important" for figuring out how to do things they've never done before (like pouring beer the right way). The recommendation algorithm: 81% of YouTube users watch videos that YouTube's mysterious algorithm recommends to them. So, Pew thought it was worthwhile to conduct over 170,000 "random walks" through the YouTube universe to see if it could crack the code. It found that YouTube suggests its users watch "progressively longer and more popular content." While the first videos encountered averaged a runtime of 9:31, videos in the fifth and final step of the "walk" averaged almost 15 minutes long. A hotbed of misinformation: Almost two-thirds of users say they sometimes see videos on YouTube that are "obviously false or untrue."
  5. ...literally. U.S. crude oil fell into bear market territory yesterday, down more than 20% from what was a four-year high set last month. It also happened to be the ninth consecutive day of losses. Crude prices have been slumping for the last five weeks. Wondering why? 1. Key producers are ramping up output. U.S. output hit an all-time high of 11.6 million barrels/day last week, per the Energy Information Administration (EIA). It estimates the U.S. is now the world's No.1 crude oil producer. Plus, Saudi Arabia and Russia (the other top producers) have also been boosting production since the summer. 2. Is demand deteriorating? The EIA reported U.S. crude stockpiles increased for the seventh-straight week. When those stockpiles grow, some oil traders get spooked about demand at current prices and sell their positions...leading to a price decline. 3. Geopolitics are shaking things up. The Trump administration reimposed sanctions on Iran earlier this week...but announced waivers for eight countries, allowing them to keep importing Iranian crude for the next 180 days. You can put your fears of a supply squeeze to rest.
  6. Will the collapse of Deutsche Bank cause Wells Fargo to collapse causing a worldwide banking crisis AGAIN? How many TOO LARGE TO FAIL banks actually failing does it take to cause another credit freeze?
  7. Between 13,250 people and 26,500 people could be out of a job So said the third-largest bank in the U.S. yesterday. The what: The bank said it'll cut 5% to 10% of its employee headcount over the next three years. Wells Fargo (+0.60%) currently has about 265,000 employees, meaning between 13,250 people and 26,500 people could be out of a job. The why: It's part of Wells Fargo's ongoing turnaround plan. Remember, Wells (which has $1.9 trillion in assets) is still recovering from a series of scandals in the past two years. In just one example, branch employees opened millions of fake accounts in customers' names to meet sales targets. + While we're here: It's been a tough week all around for Wells CEO Tim Sloan. His team had to deny rumors that former Goldman Sachs exec (and former member of the Trump admin) Gary Cohn would be replacing Sloan atop Wells Fargo.
  8. Today, Starbucks (+0.78%) is opening its first location in Italy—a "Reserve Roastery" in Milan—as an homage to the very country that inspired its espresso-fueled vision (and ~28,000 stores worldwide). But this isn't your corner coffeehouse Look back at the picture. That's what the very upscale, 25,000-square-foot Milan Roastery looks like. Plus, it offers locally roasted coffee from 30 countries alongside freshly baked pizzas and pastries...and alcoholic drinks so you won't miss your after-work aperitivo. There's a backstory: Starbucks Chairman Emeritus Howard Schultz first traveled to Milan in 1983...when there were only four Starbucks locations, all of them in Seattle. Italy's cafe culture inspired him to "build a company with the same nucleus of warmth, community, and human connection," Starbucks wrote in a release literally called, "Starbucks comes to Italy: An opera verismo in seven acts." Italy worked its magic Now, Starbucks opens a coffee shop chock full of human connection (if someone writing your name on a cup counts) every four hours on average, and it clocked in $22.4 billion in net revenue last year. This is just its third Roastery (after Seattle and Shanghai). But Starbucks plans to open Roasteries in New York, Tokyo, and Chicago this year and next. FWIW: The Milan Roastery might not be an easy sell for the proud Italian coffee-lover. Starbucks will charge more than 3x the going price for espresso and cappuccino in Milan (at least visitors from NYC will be used to overpaying). Already, one consumer group has filed a complaint over prices. Plus, Italians are deeply protective of their coffee culture. Good luck defending why your "grande" size is only a medium. So why open the Roastery? Starbucks is trying to expand abroad as U.S. sales stagnate (and force store closures). In China, for example, Starbucks opens a new location every 15 hours. And expanding its global footprint is as important as ever—$13 billion of Starbucks's $73 billion valuation is tied to opening stores over the next few years, per Forbes. h/t Daily Roast
  9. Stock repurchases by U.S. companies are leading to a “self-cannibalization” of the equity market, Pavilion Global Markets Ltd. wrote in a report Tuesday. The firm cited the S&P 500 IndexÂ’s divisor, which falls when companies reduce the number of shares outstanding and vice versa, as an indicator of this trend. The divisor dropped in July to its lowest level since March 2000, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, and was just above the low this week. - David Wilson / Bloomberg
  10. If your cabinets are looking a little bare these days, you might want to stock up soon. Consumer goods leader P&G (+0.82%) is raising prices on some of its major brands. The price of Pampers diapers in North America will increase 4% on average. Charmin toilet paper, Bounty paper towels, and Puffs tissues will all see an average price increase of 5%. And surprise! Tariffs aren't contributing to higher costs. Instead, P&G is hoping to ride a wave of rising consumer confidence to give its thinning margins a little room to breathe. Want another reason prices are going up? Here's one answer: pulp. No, not the kind that ruins an otherwise refreshing glass of orange juice...but the wood-based raw material that's used to make products from tissues to diapers. Since late 2016, hardwood pulp prices have jumped around 60%. Did you know? You can make 1,000 rolls of toilet paper from the pulp of just one eucalyptus tree. Become a pulp expert.
  11. Consumer prices edged up 0.1%, according to new CPI data. That effectively cancels out the wage growth from June. But you already knew this.....
  12. Investors would have done much better keeping an eye on Tandem Diabetes Care, a small, promising -- yet still risky -- medical products company that is growing sales, but also losing money. In the first quarter, it sold a few thousand of its next-generation insulin pump, the t:slim X2, and says it needs an installed base of 80,000 pumps to break even on a cash flow basis, though it believes it can hit that milestone some time next year. Because diabetes is a huge growth market, with the incidence of the disease expected to grow 165% in the U.S. by 2050, Tandem has a promising technology that analysts believe, if successful, could challenge Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) for industry leadership. Medtronic offers a competing technology called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that tracks a patient's blood sugar over time to let them better manage their disease. As diabetics seek alternatives to insulin injections to regulate their condition, Tandem has partnered with DexCom to bring its insulin pump system (that works with DexCom's monitoring system) to market early next year. The artificial pancreas monitors patients' blood glucose levels and uses an algorithm to know when to deliver an appropriate dose of insulin. At least one analyst thinks highly of Tandem's prospects for being able to grab market share when its system is commercialized. He upgraded the stock, which sent shares soaring. Although Medtronic is many times larger than Tandem, its CGM device is also much larger than Tandem's t:slim X2, and thus more cumbersome. And DexCom's monitors, which work with both systems, can be used for longer periods of time with Tandem's pump, making them more convenient. Also, the need for finger pricks for dosing decisions isn't needed with the t:slim X2 whereas they're still necessary with Medtronic's MiniMed system. While the potential for Tandem Diabetes Care may be more promising than for NII Holdings, it also is a risky proposition. Even though the FDA just approved Tandem's pump with its newest technology that predicts where insulin level needs and adjusts production accordingly, Medtronic also received regulatory approval for its own enhanced CGM system that now allows for treating patients between ages seven and 13. It removes a competitive advantage Tandem had with its pump being able to be used on those as young as six. Tandem's finances are probably not going to look pretty either for awhile yet. Still, by the t:slim X2 getting approved for use with DexCom's more feature-rich monitoring technology, a development that wasn't expected, there's good reason why Tandem Diabetes Care shares are soaring.
  13. The Global Diabetes Care Devices Market is expected to exceed more than US$ 30.25 Billion by 2022 at a CAGR of 5.9% in the given forecast period Browse Full Report:
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    The Global Diabetes Care Devices Market is segmented on the lines of its glucose monitoring devices, insulin delivery device, type and regional. Based on glucose monitoring device segmentation it covers blood glucose meters, blood glucose test strips, lancing devices, continuous glucose monitoring devices, HbA1c testing kits. Based on insulin delivery device segmentation it covers insulin pumps, insulin syringes and insulin pens. Based on type segmentation it covers therapy type, inject able, oral drugs. The major driving factors of Global Diabetes Care Devices Market are as follows: Increasing prevalence of diabetes care patients Development of technologies for diabetes Rising minimum or non-invasive products Growing awareness of diabetes care devices Development need for faster, safer and effective method of diagnosis and treatment of diabetes The restraining factors of Global Diabetes Care Devices Market are as follows: Expensive related with diagnosis and treatment Compensation issues and patent expiry This report provides: 1) An overview of the global market for Global Diabetes Care Devices Market and related technologies. 2) Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2013, estimates for 2014 and 2015, and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2022. 3) Identifications of new market opportunities and targeted promotional plans for Global Diabetes Care Devices Market. 4) Discussion of research and development, and the demand for new products and new applications. 5) Comprehensive company profiles of major players in the industry. The Global Diabetes Care Devices Market has been segmented as below: By Glucose Monitoring Devices Analysis: Blood Glucose Meters Blood Glucose Test Strips Lancing Devices Continuous Glucose Monitoring Devices HbA1c Testing Kits By Insulin Delivery Devices Analysis: Insulin Pumps Insulin Syringes Insulin Pens By Type Analysis: Therapy Type Injectable Oral Drugs By Regional Analysis: North America Europe Asia-Pacific Rest of the World Reasons to Buy this Report: 1) Obtain the most up to date information available on all Global Diabetes Care Devices Market. 2) Identify growth segments and opportunities in the industry. 3) Facilitate decision making on the basis of strong historic and forecast of Global Diabetes Care Devices Market data. 4) Assess your competitor's refining portfolio and its evolution.
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