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Bible Speaks

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Bible Speaks last won the day on June 4 2018

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  1. Thank you for posting. I missed them.

  2. Panda Hug 🤗 🐼🤗 In the aftermath of the (Archives) Great East Japan Earthquake, a large collection of photographs and videos surfaced on the Internet. Many tragic images of the tsunami do exist, but this is not one of them. The picture shows a giant panda holding the leg of its feeder at the Chinese Panda Protection Center in Wolong, southwest China’s Sichuan Province. - Jehovah will Save all the animals and man that seek His will and this Earth! - Bible Speaks - 🐼🌍🐼🌍🐼🌏🐼
  3. The entire National Geographic August 2018 is about sleep. One third of us will experience diagnosable sleep disorder. Animals will sooner die from lack of sleep than hunger. An upset in a substance called beta-amyloid is closely related to Alzheimer's. About 60% of the residents at our frail care home are sufferers.

  4. Beautiful Footage of Iceland Thank you Jehovah for your Creative Works, they many! ??? Icelandic moods ⛅️ | Photography by Arnar Kristjansson (@arnarkristjans_photography) #iceland #earthescope. FACTS ON ICELAND .A majority of Icelanders believe in elves. At about 39,000 square miles, Iceland is small – close to the size of Ohio. There is a volcanic eruption every 4 years on average. There are no forests in Iceland. Beer remained illegal in Iceland until 1989. At 43.5 hours per week, they have the longest work week in Europe. The Icelandic language remains unchanged from ancient Norse. That means 1,000-year-old texts are still easily read. Babies in Iceland are routinely left outside to nap. There are no surnames or family names in Iceland – Icelanders use the traditional Nordic naming system, which includes a last name that is comprised from their father’s (or mother’s) first name with the addition of -dóttir (-daughter) or -son. 60% of the Icelandic population lives in Reykjavík.Stykkishólmur Iceland Iceland’s revenue from whale watching exceeds any income from whaling. Usually a temperate country, not too hot or cold, the highest temperature recorded was 30.5 °C (86.9 °F) at the Eastern fjords in 1939. Iceland had the first democratically elected female and openly gay Prime Ministers. Consumption of Coca–Cola per capita is higher than in any other country. But there aren’t any McDonald’s Restaurants anywhere in Iceland. In 2010 Iceland banned strip clubs. Roughly 85 percent of Iceland’s energy is from renewable resources, and well over half of that is geothermal alone. Icelandic horses display two additional gaits as compared to all other breeds. First names not previously used in Iceland must be approved by the Icelandic Naming Committee. Iceland was one of the last places on earth to be settled by humans.Blue Lagoon Iceland Icelanders watch more movies than any other nation. Iceland is home to one of the world’s oldest democracies; established in 930. In Iceland owning a pet snake, lizard or turtle is against the law. The country’s national sport is handball. Iceland does not have an army, navy or air force. Mosquitoes do not exist in Iceland. The Icelandic police don’t carry guns. Crime in Iceland is very low and violent crime is practically nonexistent. Per capita Iceland has the highest number of book and magazine publications and 10% of the country’s population will publish a book in their lifetimes. Icelandic telephone directories list Icelanders by first name alphabetically. In 2010, 97.6% of Icelandic population had Internet connection. Raw puffin heart is considered a delicacy.
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  5. Devastating Hawaii! Pray for Hawaii! Volcano ?. Tap on Video Link mp4 __________ ???? . #Repost @miguelsaravia89 B93B54E8-ABC2-4EA4-B5A8-B923F0AE979A.MP4
  6. @admin Rhododendrum Beautiful is it not? ?????
  7. Hawaii volcano poses a new threat: Acid from Kilauea's lava, called 'laze,' pouring into the ocean Chris Woodyard | USA TODAYUpdated 11:21 a.m. EDT May 21, 2018
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  8. The Implacable Power of Volcanic Lava In 1935, lava from an eruption of the volcano Mauna Loa, on the Big Island of Hawai’i, started oozing toward the Wailuku River, main source of water for the city of Hilo. This danger to the more than 15,000 residents of Hilo was exactly the opportunity that Thomas Jaggar, founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, had been waiting for: to blow up a volcano. This isn’t as crazy as it sounds. Actually, no, it was crazy. Jaggar thought, based on the state of the science, that explosives would collapse and plug the channels and underground tubes through which lava flows. He approached the Army Air Corps, which had an airbase on the island of Oahu. There, a young lieutenant colonel named George Patton (yes, that Patton) planned a mission to deploy three Keystone B-3A bombers and two Keystone B-6As—biplanes!—to the slopes of Mauna Loa, where they’d drop 20 600-pound bombs on the lava. Five dropped onto red-hot flows, splashing lava 200 feet into the air upon detonation (which then punched holes through one of the bombers’ wings). Most of the other bombs hit the solidified sides of the flows. A US Geological Survey geologist on board one of the planes, Harold Stearns, reported that most of the bombs merely impacted on the surface. So did it work? Well, the lava diverted and stopped flowing before it reached the river. It remains … controversial as to whether the bombs or the cessation of the eruption did it. (Jaggar thought the explosions released enough pressure to stop the lava; no one else does.) Volcanoes have a lot of ways to kill people—caustic ash, superheated hurricane-like pyroclastic flows, incandescent mudslides called lahars...and, of course, lava. As the world watches the ongoing eruption of the volcano Kilauea, Mauna Loa’s neighbor to the east, you can see why Jaggar would resort to explosives, and why people have been trying to build lava barriers, unsuccessfully, since 1881. Lava’s appearance is rarely a surprise—but where it flows and how fast remain unpredictable. And it is, as researchers say, binary. Wherever it goes, it incinerates or buries everything in its path. There’s not much anyone can do about it except watch. “A lot of cultures around the world have come to the conclusion that it’s a bad idea to live too close to a volcano,” says Natalia Deligne, a volcanic hazard and risk modeler at GNS Science, the New Zealand equivalent of the USGS. That’s why lots of volcanoes are magically inside national parks. “If you look at indigenous traditions, often the vent area is a taboo area,” Deligne says. “That’s just another form of land use planning.” Unlike the ostentatious, once-in-a-blew-moon eruptors like the stratovolcanoes of the Cascades and the Andes, Hawaiian volcanoes are “shield volcanoes,” slow and steady pumps of relatively runny, low-silica lava. Volcanoes in general aren’t as murderous as other natural disasters—since 1900 volcanoes have killed about 280,000 humans, but in that same time earthquakes have killed more than 2 million. Lava comes in three types (highly viscous, deep “blocky” lava; chunky, fast-moving ‘a ‘a, and smooth pahoehoe), and it tends to move slow enough that it destroys property rather than kills people. So people continue to live on the slopes of the volcanoes. (Hawai'ian volcanoes also emit toxic, corrosive gas—sulfur dioxide turns into sulfuric acid on contact with the atmosphere, creating potentially deadly clouds called vog, short for “volcanic smog” [itself a contraction of “smoke” and “fog”].) That’s what’s happening at Kilauea; lava is emerging from 14 fissures in the volcano’s East Rift Zone, amid a housing subdivision called Leilani Estates. More than 1,700 people had to evacuate, and about a dozen homes were consumed. This has been the situation, on and off, since the 1980s. “The lava would flow for a certain distance, then stop, and then rather than resuming travel in the same direction it would go back toward the vent and break out somewhere else,” says Michael Lindell, an emeritus environmental psychologist at Texas A&M who studies attitudes toward volcano risk. “Volcanologists don’t thoroughly understand the underground plumbing. They’ve got a pretty good idea, but they keep getting surprised.” Even today, lava is unpredictable. Nobody really understands tube and channel formation or how a’a’ lava becomes pahoehoe and vice versa. Computers can forecast paths of flow from topography, but not speed or how wide the flow will be. (The USGS map of lava hazard zoneson Hawai’i hasn’t been updated since 1992.) “How fast it’s coming out of the vents, how hot it is, how fast it’s cooling, how many crystals you have in the lava—those are all parameters that will dictate how the lava will flow,” Deligne says. There’s not much to do about it when it does. Deligne says that hardly anyone actually zones construction or writes building codes with volcanoes in mind. And even if you did, what then? Ash, sure, just build your roofs with a pitch of greater than 35 degrees to shed the stuff. But lava? Maybe … round buildings? According to one of the few analyses of such things, a forensic look at a 2014 eruption of the Fogo volcano on Cape Verde, lava pushes them into compression, actually strengthening them; it tends to just push over flat walls. Sometimes the volcano is quiet; sometimes it’s not. “Pele, the goddess of Hawaiian volcanoes, whose home is in Halema‘uma‘u Crater within Kilauea Caldera, is always described with two personas,” young and beautiful—and old and cruel, write James Kauahikaua and Robert Tilling, two past heads of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Now, the observatory is warning that things could get worse. A rapid lowering of the lava level in the Overlook crater at Kilauea’s summit was the first sign that lava was on the move. If that lava dips below the groundwater level, it could start making steam, converting this to an explosive eruption, scientists warned at a press conference. The Washington Postreports that a nearby geothermal power plant is moving 12,000 gallons of a flammable fuel called pentane to an industrial park that’s out of range, just to be safe. But in the face of the threat, people’s attitudes toward volcanoes aren’t much different from how they feel about other hazards. Deligne loves volcanoes; she says she can’t imagine living anywhere there might be tornadoes. Lindell says if he had to live on the Big Island, he’d definitely try to stay on the north side—away from the volcanoes. As for the south side? “It’s incredibly cheap to live there and it’s a very pleasant life, so it’s an acceptable risk to them,” he says. “In some respects it’s no different than people living on the Hayward fault, or on the flood plain in Houston. They know the risk is getting worse, but they keep on rebuilding.”
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  9. Massive New Fissures Open On Hawaiian Volcano, Prompting More Evacuations Some 37 buildings have been destroyed and nearly 2,000 people ordered to evacuate in the past 10 days. PAHOA, Hawaii, May 13 (Reuters) - Two new fissures opened on Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, hurling bursts of rock and magma with an ear-piercing screech on Sunday, threatening nearby homes and prompting authorities to order new evacuations. One new fissure from Sunday morning was a vivid gouge of magma with smoke pouring out both ends and was the 17th to open on the volcano since it began erupting on May 3. Some 37 buildings have been destroyed and nearly 2,000 people ordered to evacuate in the past 10 days. Viewed from a helicopter, the crack appeared to be about 1,000 feet (300 meters) long and among the largest of those fracturing the side of Kilauea, a 4,000-foot-high volcano with a lake of lava at its summit. “It is a near-constant roar akin to a full-throttle 747 interspersed with deafening, earth-shattering explosions that hurtle 100-pound lava bombs 100 feet into the air,” said Mark Clawson, 64, who lives uphill from the latest fissure and so far is defying an evacuation order. Read more:
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  10. There is a saying: ””There is no atheist in a fox hole.” Perhaps when he returns to this earth in the New World he will continue to see Our Grand Creator and Instructor? Religion has damaged so many minds. Even a genius can not phantom Jehovah God. Knowledge is a gift from Our Creator. Jehovah reads hearts. We know those who die will have a New Hope to really know Who Jehovah God is, Our God of Miracles and the heavens and earth! - Bible Speaks - Quote from News Source continues: In the past, there's been a tiny bit of ambiguity: In "A Brief History of Time," Hawking writes that the discovery of a unifying set of scientific principles known as the theory of everything would enable scientists to "know the mind of God." But in a follow-up book about the quest for the theory of everything, titled "The Grand Design," Hawking said the mechanism behind the origin of the universe was becoming so well known that God was no longer necessary. El Mundo's Pablo Jauregui asked about those two references to God in one of the questions he prepared for Hawking to answer, and here's the scientist's response: "Before we understand science, it is natural to believe that God created the universe. But now science offers a more convincing explanation. What I meant by 'we would know the mind of God' is, we would know everything that God would know, if there were a God, which there isn't. I'm an atheist." Hawking addressed the issue more delicately several years ago when he told Reuters that he was "not religious in the normal sense," and said "God does not intervene to break the laws" that He decreed. Since then, however, there's been a lot more theorizing devoted to the origin of the universe. Hawking now believes that an approach known as M-theory will eventually reveal the grand design of the cosmos. "In my opinion, there is no aspect of reality beyond the reach of the human mind," Hawking told El Mundo.
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  11. Stephen Hawking, British physicist and author, dies at 76 Stephen Hawking, who beat the odds his entire life, died peacefully at his home in Cambridge, England, early Wednesday, a family spokesman said in a statement. Hawking was as famous for his insights on black holes, the existence of God and quantum gravity as he was for using a special device to speak while confined to a wheelchair after an ALS diagnosis at age 21. Hawking gave the world insights into the unknown and several gems of quotes, including, "Life would be tragic if it weren't funny."
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  12. Satan 2: Putin Tells U.S. 'You Will Listen To Russia Now' as he Deploys Hypersonic Nuclear ICBM "You will listen to us now," the Russian president told the world. March 01, 2018 Russian President Vladimir Putin said Russia is developing a new generation of advanced nuclear weapons including a hypersonic intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that can reach almost anywhere in the world and cannot be shot down by anti-missile systems. Putin made the claim during his annual presidential address to the Federal Assembly in Moscow. He officially unveiled a new hypersonic nuclear-capable ICBM called the RS-28 Sarmat and said it would be able to strike anywhere in the U.S.—adding that testing of the weapon is now complete. NATO calls the nuke "Satan 2"
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