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Found 21 results

  1. IOS 11 REVIEW: 10 THINGS TO TRY

    OS 11 is available, officially, today. It's coming to every iPhone and iPad made in the past few years, and chances are, you're going to upgrade. When you install it on your iPhone, you'll find that some things are very different than what you're used to, but the core of how you get around and experience the OS will be the same. For example: the Control Center is wildly different and notifications have changed slightly, but you still have that comfortable (and comforting) grid of apps on the home screen. A lot is new, but not so much that you can't recognize it. The iPad is a different story. That's where Apple has made the most radical changes to the way you open and manage your apps. Apple has introduced an app dock that's available no matter what you're doing with a quick swipe up, so you can get to your most-important apps quicker. It's also changed the way that multitasking works, giving you more flexibility with split-screen apps. And you can now drag and drop content between apps, a feature that takes some finger Jiu Jitsu, but is remarkably powerful once you get used to it. Read more:
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  2. It’s September, and that means that there are some new iPhones in town. Specifically, there were three new phones announced today at Apple’s fall event: the high-end iPhone X, which was the star of the show with a new bezel-less design, OLED screen, and 3D face-scanning tech. There’s also the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, the Apple Watch Series 3 (i.e., the Apple Watch Series 2 with LTE), and the Apple TV 4K (a, um, Apple TV with 4K). Oh, and everything is more powerful and faster, too. Missed something during all the chaos? We’ve got the details below, along with full coverage of Apple’s newest iPhones and products. Read more:
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  3. It’s June again, so it’s time for Apple to give the world a look at what it’s been up to and what we should expect from the iPhone, the Mac, and everything in between in the months to come. On Monday, Apple will kick off this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference with a keynote presentation where, like every year, the company’s top executives will take the stage to talk about their next big releases. Traditionally, WWDC has been a software show, with a heavy focus on iOS and macOS (and, recently, tvOS and watchOS as well). But this year, there have been rumblings that we should expect some hardware news too — including at least one brand new product — which could make the event even more interesting than usual. The keynote starts at 1PM ET / 10AM PT on June 5th. The Verge will be reporting live from San Jose, so be sure to come back then for all the news. For now, here’s our guide on what to expect on Monday. There haven’t been a ton of leaks this year, so while we have some ideas of what Apple’s planning, there should still be plenty of surprises in store. Continue reading
  4. Here’s something to look forward to in 2017. Apple’s highly anticipated Siri-controlled speaker has finally entered overseas production, Bloomberg reports, and will be gracing nightstands and mantels by year’s end. Apple’s smart speaker, which is being manufactured by the same Taiwanese company that builds its AirPods, will face stiff competition in Amazon’s Echo and Google Home. However, it has a couple of advantages. First and foremost, it will produce stellar sound and feature “virtual surround sound technology” that mimics the effect of a multi-speaker array. Bloomberg cites people familiar with the speaker who say that it will leverage advanced acoustics technology to produce louder and crisper sound compared to its rivals. The Siri speaker may even include “sensors that measure a room’s acoustics and automatically adjust audio levels during use”, the report states. It hasn’t been confirmed yet whether it will feature Beats technology, as alleged earlier this year by Apple leaker Sonny Dickinson. The other major selling point is that the speaker will be deeply integrated with the HomeKit product lineup, allowing it to function as a hub to control other smart home appliances such as lights, locks, and thermostats. This will give HomeKit users a convenient, Siri-augmented way to control their smart gadgets. It will also entrench users further within Cupertino’s growing ecosystem and may encourage them to turn to Apple services like Apple Music. In addition, Bloomberg reports that the smart speaker will likely support third party services, meaning you might be able to hail an Uber ride with it or send text messages by issuing voice commands to it. Veteran KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo also indicated earlier this month that the speaker will feature integrations with iOS, Mac, and AirPlay. The long-awaited, standalone Siri device may debut as early as June 5 during Apple’s WWDC keynote, though it will likely be a couple months before it is ready to ship.
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  5. Among the long list of next-generation features and refinements, Apple’s highly-anticipated iPhone 8 will reportedly boast an “enhanced receiver” with “further improvements to stereo sound,” according to the latest research note released by a group of JP Morgan analysts, including Gokul Hariharan, who periodically track the latest happenings within Apple’s Asia-Pacific supply chain. The iPhone’s receiver is the small, mesh-grilled cutout on the top-center of the device, which is also commonly referred to as the earpiece through which users can hear the caller on the other end of the line. The iPhone 7’s earpiece was the first to be redesigned as an actual loud speaker, meaning that the 2016 handset features stereo-quality audio output from both its top and bottom ends. Apple claims that with two speakers, “iPhone 7 delivers two times the audio output of an iPhone 6s with increased dynamic range.” The research note apparently stops short of providing any details about what acoustical improvements iPhone 8 hopefuls can expect with the enhanced audio technology, however at the very least, we can expect better sound quality and a higher peak volume for audio output. The report also alleges that the speaker, itself, will be equipped with better waterproofing, echoing the sentiments of a previous report that suggested the iPhone 8 will ship featuring advanced, IP68 dust- and water-proofing certification. iPhone 8 Could Come Bundled with AirPods Interestingly, the note goes on to allege that instead of Apple’s standard EarPods with a Lightning to 3.5mm headset adapter, Apple will ship a free pair of its super-premium wireless AirPods with every iPhone 8 — which could also be called the iPhone Edition. While the likelihood of this rumor being true is slim, it’s actually not impossible. We know that Apple’s top-of-the-line, 10th anniversary handset will be special, boasting a myriad of next-generation technologies and fulfilling almost all of our iPhone feature fantasies. We also know, based on previous reports, that the flagship will command a hefty price — perhaps somewhere in the ballpark of $1,000 for the base-model featuring 64 GB of storage. Therefore, while it’s unlikely that Apple will replace its $29 EarPods (which cost practically nothing to manufacture) with a pair of $159 AirPods, we’ll encourage you take this rumor with a grain of salt, at least until we see what Apple has to say when the device is unveiled later on this year. In the interim, the rumor mill has provided us with a whirlwind of information pertaining to the iPhone Edition’s advanced feature set, which will include a dramatic redesign in the form of a glass and steel frame, next-generation internals including a beastly A11 SoC, a larger battery with wireless charging capabilities, a gorgeous 5.8-inch OLED display, IP68 dust- and water-proofing, and Apple’s revolutionary new 3D facial recognition platform. JPMorgan estimates that the device will cost between $75 and $80 more to manufacture than the iPhone 7
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  6. This year’s flagship iPhone might arrive in time for a September release as manufacturers and assemblers have resolved production bottlenecks and ramp-up issues, according to a new supply chain report. Motherboard substrate makers Zhen Ding and Kinsus Interconnect have worked out their respective production problems and are preparing to ramp up production in June, according to an early Monday report by the Economic Daily News. Long-time Apple partner TSMC is also preparing to begin mass production of the A11 chip — also in June — and will deliver the chips in volume to assemblers by the second half of July. Battery supplier Simplo Technology is also gearing up for the upcoming Apple flagship. In addition, the report states that iPhone assemblers Foxconn Electronics, Pegatron and Winstron have begun the surge hiring process. This, in addition to providing the required training for new hires, will allow all three assemblers to have an adequate workforce in time for the iPhone 8’s (or iPhone Edition’s) production ramp-up, the Economic Daily News reported. This new information does fly in the face of previous reports from DigiTimes and renowned Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, among others. Both of those sources suggested earlier this year that the flagship iPhone 8 would not be ready to ship in time for a traditional Apple September release, owing to new technologies and production bottlenecks. It’s worth noting that Kuo later amended that prediction on April 24 — stating that the iPhone 8 would indeed be unveiled in September, but would face “severe supply shortages” at launch The new supply chain reports out of China today seem to amend those April predictions even further. While they don’t exactly contradict Kuo’s latest prediction, they do seem to indicate that the Apple supply chain is fixing its production issues — and that there’s a higher chance that the iPhone 8 will indeed be released during the normal September timeframe.
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  7. 5 New Ways to Improve iPhone Battery Life

    The iPhone is a powerful tool, and for most of us, it’s a constant digital companion that enables us to be more productive, connected and entertained. That is, until the battery runs out. Maybe you’ve noticed some battery-drain issues with your iPhone, or maybe you just want to maximize the amount of battery life that your iPhone gets. Whatever the case may be, here are 5 new and updated ways to make your iPhone battery last longer. 5. Reduce Motion First introduced in iOS 7, Background Motion is a neat little feature that gives a bit of life to your iPhone home screen. When enabled, the parallax effect causes app icons and the background image to subtly “move” on different planes when you move your iPhone around. Of course, while cool, this feature does contribute to battery drain. If you want to absolutely maximize your battery life, you’re better off disabling it. Here’s how to do it. Open Settings. Tap General. Tap Accessibility. Tap Reduce Motion, and ensure that the toggle is off. 4. Delete the Facebook App If you’re like the majority of people, you’re probably on Facebook, and you probably have the Facebook app downloaded to your iPhone. But while the social media app is a handy way to keep in touch, it can also wreak havoc on your iPhone’s battery by auto-loading /auto-playing videos and continuously searching for your location. If you’re willing to trade a little bit of convenience for top-notch battery performance, one of the simplest ways is to delete the Facebook app, and use iPhone’s web browser to log onto Facebook instead. Pro-Tip: Add a Safari shortcut to Facebook on your Home Screen for easy access. When browsing Facebook.com, just tap the Share icon, and then tap Add to Home Screen. 3. Turn off AirDrop AirDrop is a handy — and arguably underused — feature that iPhones are already equipped with. What is AirDrop? Well, it allows you to easily and seamlessly share files with other Apple devices when they are in close proximity, whether by Bluetooth or over a Wi-Fi network. But for all of its convenience, AirDrop can drain your battery — especially if your phone is in “discoverable” mode. To fix potential battery drain issues.. Swipe up from the bottom of the Home screen to access the Control Center. Tap AirDrop. Tap Receiving Off when you’re not using the feature. 2. Don’t Push E-Mails Does your iPhone notify you as soon as you receive a new email? If so, then you probably have Push enabled. While this is a convenient way of keeping tabs on your inbox, it also drains your device’s battery very quickly. Here’s how to optimize your battery via the email settings. Go to Settings. Tap Mail. Tap Accounts. Tap Fetch New Data. From here, you can disable or enable Push. Pro Tip: As an alternative, you can enable Fetch — which lets you set a time interval for your iPhone to check emails. The longer the interval, the less power it uses. If you’re already an avid email-checker, you can simply change the setting to Manual. This uses the least amount of battery, as the phone will only check for new emails when you actually open the app in question. 1. Turn on Low-Power Mode In iOS 9, Apple packaged a powerful new tool to help users manage battery life: Low-Power Mode. When enabled, the mode reduces or disables background app refresh, automatic downloads, Night Shift, some Siri functions, mail fetch options, and other features until the phone is fully charged. As a result, Low-Power Mode gives your iPhone battery life a significant boost — at the cost of some convenience features. When your battery hits 20 percent or so, your iPhone will automatically ask you if you want to enable the feature. Alternatively, you can toggle it on or off manually. Open the Settings app. Tap Battery. Toggle on Low Power Mode.
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  8. A handful of apps are no longer supported on the Apple Watch, according to a report by Apple Insider. Major apps like Google Maps, Amazon, and eBay appear to have quietly abandoned the Apple Watch App Store, without giving a heads-up or providing any explanation to users. AI reports that Google pulled support for its Maps app on watchOS a few weeks ago, while recent updates to the Amazon and eBay apps no longer reference support for the Apple Watch. Other affected apps include Target (the main one, not its coupon app Cartwheel) and TripAdvisor. A TripAdvisor thread dating back to February questioned the changes, but users said they emailed technical support and received no response. Continue reading
  9. SAN FRANCISCO — Travis Kalanick, the chief executive of Uber, visited Apple’s headquarters in early 2015 to meet with Timothy D. Cook, who runs the iPhone maker. It was a session that Mr. Kalanick was dreading. For months, Mr. Kalanick had pulled a fast one on Apple by directing his employees to help camouflage the ride-hailing app from Apple’s engineers. The reason? So Apple would not find out that Uber had been secretly identifying and tagging iPhones even after its app had been deleted and the devices erased — a fraud detection maneuver that violated Apple’s privacy guidelines. But Apple was onto the deception, and when Mr. Kalanick arrived at the midafternoon meeting sporting his favorite pair of bright red sneakers and hot-pink socks, Mr. Cook was prepared. “So, I’ve heard you’ve been breaking some of our rules,” Mr. Cook said in his calm, Southern tone. Stop the trickery, Mr. Cook then demanded, or Uber’s app would be kicked out of Apple’s App Store. For Mr. Kalanick, the moment was fraught with tension. If Uber’s app was yanked from the App Store, it would lose access to millions of iPhone customers — essentially destroying the ride-hailing company’s business. So Mr. Kalanick acceded. In a quest to build Uber into the world’s dominant ride-hailing entity, Mr. Kalanick has openly disregarded many rules and norms, backing down only when caught or cornered. He has flouted transportation and safety regulations, bucked against entrenched competitors and capitalized on legal loopholes and gray areas to gain a business advantage. In the process, Mr. Kalanick has helped create a new transportation industry, with Uber spreading to more than 70 countries and gaining a valuation of nearly $70 billion, and its business continues to grow. Continue reading
  10. The unlikely pair makes more sense than you think. When buying an Apple Watch, customers have just a couple of choices for bands. There are, of course, in-house options from Apple, high-end bands from Hérmes, and sporty picks from Nike. The latest added to that triumvirate is a bit surprising: shoe brand Toms. Yes, the OG one-for-one company is getting into the watch band business, and worked with Apple to create a pair of bands that each come in multiple colors, for people looking to bring a bit of granola flair to their techy wrists. Toms is still finding a way to give back through the bands, but not via a straight one-for-one model. Instead, for every Toms for Apple Watch band purchased, households in need will be given one year of solar light. In total, Toms hopes to provide 10,000 years of solar light. The cause is unquestionably great, but Toms getting into this space does inspire a couple queries. When the watch first launched, Apple pushed the product hard to fashion consumers. It had a 12-page spread in Vogue, was on the cover of Vogue China, and special editions were gifted to people like Chanel creative director Karl Lagerfeld. That direction has cooled a bit. In September, our sister site The Verge wrote that “Apple’s luxury watch dream is over.” Sales are also down; according to CNN, they’ve dropped 55% since the early 2015 launch, despite the fact that Apple released a new, cheaper version. Given all that, it makes sense that now they’re working with a brand like Toms. Prices are relatively low — just $49 and $75 — for each band. The new relationship is mutually beneficial: Apple has something new to offer its customers that’ll appeal to a more casual crowd, and Toms gets to benefit from the tech giant’s authority and fanbase. “We’re excited to reach Apple’s wide audience and their loyal fans,” Toms founder Blake Mycoskie said over email.
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  11. Apples from the Patterson Orchard

    Patterson Bethel Apple Orchard Do you have photos / video from Patterson Apple Orchard? Post them below:
  12. At today’s live Apple event, the fruit unveiled the iPhone 7, Apple Watch Series 2, and the Apple Watch Nike+. The watch — which comes in two sizes, 38 mm ($369) and 42mm ($399) —features built-in GPS tracking, a perforated sport band for ventilation, Nike+ Run Club app integration, and exclusive Siri commands for starting a run. Plus, push(y) notifications: The Nike+ Run Club app offers daily motivation through smart run reminders, challenges from friends and even alerts informing when the weather is right to get outside. Training data, including pace, distance and heart rate are available at a glance, and through shared run summaries, the app promotes friendly competition, even allowing users to send fist bumps to each other right from the wrist. One prompt in particular asks, “Are we running today?” No, Apple Watch,WE are not running. I am running; you are merely along for the ride, capturing all of my personal data, which you will use to expertly nag me at a later date.
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  13. How can I uninstall an App?

    How do I uninstall an app at my Mac? Thank you
  14. And the tech giant has created an app to fix that The new Apple Watch will include the Breathe app — Screencap from Apple's web site The third iteration of the Apple Watch, unveiled today at the company’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC), will have a number of new apps focused on health, allowing it to compete more directly with wearables like Fitbit. Its new Activity app will help athletes share results with their friends; another is specially designed to track the activity of athletes bound to wheelchairs. But, as Jay Blahnik, Apple’s director of fitness and health technologies said in his presentation today, there’s more to health than fitness. The new Breathe app is designed to help stressed-out users relax. Several times throughout the day, the app will ping the user, saying it’s time to take a minute to breathe. The user can hit the snooze button, so the reminder comes back later if they’re in the middle of something, or they can start the exercises then. Using animations and vibrations, the app then guides the user through deep breathing exercises that last between one and five minutes. The watch detects the user’s heart rate, which shows up on the screen, to see how the exercises are working. Deep breathing isn’t a new technique—it’s been incorporated into millennia-old practices like meditation and yoga. Although a quote from Deepak Chopra, whoGizmodo calls a “noted bullshitter,” was included in Blahnik’s presentation, the science backing up the benefits of breathing exercises is rock solid. Over the past few decades, multiple studies have shown that deep breathing can help ease symptoms of mental illnesses such as anxiety, stress, and depression, as well as physiological ailments such as pain (even during childbirth) andrecovery after heart surgery. “You can influence asthma; you can influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; you can influence heart failure,” Mladen Golubic, an internist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Integrative Medicine, told NPR. “There are studies that show that people who practice breathing exercises and have those conditions — they benefit.” Here’s the thing, though—if you’re stressed about doing your exercises right, or if some digital system repeatedly diverts your attention while you’re occupied with something else, then there’s no point. But for Apple Watch users who could use a little mental health break throughout the day, this app might just be a game changer. Source:
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  15. Why Apple Invested $1 Billion in Didi

    Apple is deepening its ties in China with a $1 billion investment in ride-hailing company Didi. Bloomberg's Tim Higgins examines the deal and what it could mean for Apple in China.
  16. Where do I get the Watchtower Library in Spanish for Mac? How do I get the files to install in Mac? My Mac does not have a CD-ROM Drive
  17. Apple partners with Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster!
  18. Apple's legal battle with the FBI is shaping up to be the corporate personhood case of the year. Like 2010's Citizens United or 2014's Hobby Lobby, the case raises deep questions about how far we want to travel in granting more and more constitutional rights to corporations. Most people following the case -- in which a federal judge ordered Apple to give the FBI technical assistance to help it access an encrypted iPhone used by one of the alleged San Bernardino shooters -- are primarily interested in who wins, not howthey win. But the legal issues go beyond the particular facts, or even broader concerns about public safety, privacy and encryption. That's because Apple and itsallies have raised some fairly weird questions. If a law requires a company to write software code over its objection, does the law compel "speech"? Do corporations have "liberty"? Can a corporation be enslaved? To be sure, most of Apple's legal argument focuses on whether or not Congress has authorized federal courts to issue the type of order involved here. The judge relied on a broadly written (but quite old) law called the All Writs Act that begs for some interpretation. Apple contends, with some force, that the All Writs Act shouldn't be interpreted to give judges this authority. A federal judge in New York agreed with this interpretation in an unrelated drug case (now under appeal). So Apple and many of its allies argue that the question of how far the law should go in requiring companies to provide technical assistance to the government in accessing encrypted phones should be decided by Congress, not the courts. But Apple also insists that, whatever Congress might have said or might say in the future, it can't require Apple to help the FBI, because that would violate the ultimate trump card: corporate constitutional rights. Apple's first constitutional claim is that the court order violates the company's First Amendment right to freedom of speech. According to Apple, the order compels "speech" because complying would require the company to write software code (tweaks to the iOS operating system) that the company would rather not write. This type of compelled speech argument stems from a seminal 1943 Supreme Courtcase about Jehovah's Witnesses who objected to forced recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance. As the court then explained, "No official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein." The connection to the iPhone case may seem hazy, but courts have lately been treating corporations likereligious objectors, even in the narrow context of stock market disclosure laws. An amicus brief from industry giants including Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft summarizes the compelled speech theory here: "The government seeks to force Apple and its engineers to write software -- that is, to engage in protected speech -- against their will." But in the information age, many laws require corporations to write software "against their will." Laws that govern everything from air pollution to the stock market increasingly require companies to submit compliance data in electronicformats. Complying with these laws will often involve writing code that company executives and staff might prefer not to write. (Even an Excel formula or a shortscript written by the company's IT department is software code.) Writing code to comply with legal requirements is a cost of doing business in the modern world. Apple's First Amendment argument, if accepted, could create a new "writing code" excuse for corporate objectors. That's not far-fetched. Right now, the packaged food industry is suing Vermont over a state law requiring labels on food produced with genetically engineered ingredients. The companies say the law violates their right not to "speak." They alsonote that complying with the law would require expensive changes to inventory, labeling and distribution systems. They probably didn't think to argue that these changes would also require writing new software code, or that the fact that they would need to write new code is a separate First Amendment violation, but they're surely watching Apple's case unfold. Apple's second constitutional argument cites the Fifth Amendment, which says that no "person" can be "deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law." According to Apple, requiring technical assistance here would deprive it of "liberty." So far, though, corporate personhood hasn't swallowed the due process clause. Longstanding precedent -- stemming from an insurance company's attempt to challenge a consumer protection law making it harder for insurers to deny life insurance coverage -- holds that due process protects "the liberty of natural, not artificial, persons." Apple cites stirring Supreme Court language about "protection of the individual," but that gives away the game. Apple isn't an "individual," and as an artificial legal entity, it doesn't have the "unalienable rights" of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." The final (and most colorful) corporate personhood argument comes from an amicus brief by Lavabit, a software company that had its own run-in with the US government over encryption. Lavabit contends that a court order violates theThirteenth Amendment, which was passed to end slavery. Under Lavabit's theory, the Thirteenth Amendment prohibits "forcing labor" on a corporation. But its argument is so broad that it could also apply to emergency cleanup orders under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Companies facing these orders, like a drilling company accused of contaminating Texas groundwater, sometimes resist these orders. Giving them a Thirteenth Amendment argument would only encourage recalcitrance. Requiring a corporation to assist the government over its objection shouldn't be taken lightly. But it's hardly unprecedented. During and after World War II, the US government often requisitioned materials needed by the armed forces, such as silk for parachutes. Even today, the Selective Service Act gives the government the authority to order factories to manufacture materials for the military in time of need. The law reflects political compromises on everything from how to compensate companies to whether there should be a special role for steel. But it has never been understood as violating any "constitutional rights" of silk or steel manufacturers. The real danger of these First, Fifth and Thirteenth Amendment arguments is that constitutional theories usually escape the confines of their original cases. The historical origins of corporate personhood trace back to a case about railroad taxes.Citizens United itself began as a case about a nonprofit making a documentary for video on demand, and wound up creating a new corporate right to spend unlimited amounts of money to influence elections. None of this is to say that Apple shouldn't win in this particular case. It might well be right about the extent of the All Writs Act, and there are other arguments that could support its position, too. But expanding corporate personhood could lead us into far more perilous territory than Apple reveals. Source:
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  19. Apple to Buy Twitter?

    With it's recent move to handle customer service via Twitter... this brings up the above question. I have wondered for a long time why Apple has never entered the social media game. Maybe they wanted to let it play out first? Maybe they wanted to watch the continued demise of Google +? I have been saying for over a year that I expect Apple will buy Twitter and will even more tightly integrate it into it's OS's. What do you think? Why have they stayed out for so long?