Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dr. gabriel gaby barkay'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • English
    • Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Weekly Study Materials
  • Testigos de Jehová's Tema
  • Chevrolet Volt's Topics
  • Nederlands's Topics
  • ελληνικά's Topics
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Topics
  • Tieng Viet's Topics
  • русский's Topics
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Topics
  • Polski's Topics
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Topics
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Topics
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Topics
  • Portugués's Topics
  • Testimoni di Geova's Topics
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Topics
  • Deutsch's Topics
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Topics
  • Nouvelles du Monde's Topics
  • Español's Topics
  • Korea 세계 포럼's Topics / 주제
  • Tiếng Việt's Chủ đề

Categories

  • Records
  • Food and Drink
  • Health and Medicine
  • Religion
  • Español
  • Bitcoin

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Events
  • Testigos de Jehová's Calendario
  • Chevrolet Volt's Events
  • Nederlands's Events
  • ελληνικά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Tieng Viet's Events
  • русский's Events
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Events
  • Polski's Events
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Events
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Events
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Events
  • Portugués's Events
  • Testimoni di Geova's Events
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Events
  • Deutsch's Events
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Events
  • Español's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

Found 1 result

  1. In 1979 two silver mini scrolls (actually amulets in antiquity) were discovered at Ketef Hinnom, an archaeological site that now has been incorporated into the Menachem Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem. Dating to around 2,600 years ago they are written in paleo-Hebrew and contain the oldest biblical passage that survives to present day, part of a priestly blessing found in Numbers 6:24-26. The amulets say that Yahweh is stronger than evil and a "rebuker of evil." Researchers think the amulets would have offered protection to those who wore them. http://www.livescience.com/40046-holy-land-archaeological-finds.html Dead Sea Scrolls A young shepherd named Muhammed Edh-Dhib first discovered the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1946 or 1947 near the site of Qumran in what is now the West Bank. Over the next decade, scientists and Bedouin would discover more than 900 manuscripts located in 11 caves. They include canonical works from the Hebrew Bible, including Genesis, Exodus, Isaiah, Kings and Deuteronomy. They also include calendars, hymns, psalms, apocryphal (non-canonical) biblical works and community rules. One scroll is made of copper and describes the location of buried treasure. The texts date from between roughly 200 B.C. up until about A.D. 70 when the Romans put down a revolt in Jerusalem and Qumran was abandoned. The authorship of the scrolls is a source of debate. A popular theory among scholars is that a monastic sect called the Essenes lived at Qumran, and they wrote and collected the texts. http://www.livescience.com/40046-holy-land-archaeological-finds.html Khirbet Qeiyafa Khirbet Qeiyafa flourished almost 3,000 years ago and is located about 19 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem. A casemate city wall with two gates surrounds the 6-acre (2.3 hectares) settlement, and some researchers claim it is the biblical city of Sha'arayim. The site may also have played an important role during Israel's "United Monarchy" period and, in July 2013, researchers announced they had identified a structure more than 10,000 square feet (1,000 square meters) in size as a palace that may have been used by King David himself. http://www.livescience.com/38318-king-david-palace-found-israel.html This aerial picture shows David's palace and the Byzantine farmhouse that was build on top of it. Credit: Sky View, courtesy of the Hebrew University and the Israel Antiquities Authority Archaeologists say they've uncovered two royal buildings from Israel's biblical past, including a palace suspected to have belonged to King David. The findings at Khirbet Qeiyafa — a fortified hilltop city about 19 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem — indicate that David, who defeated Goliath in the Bible, ruled a kingdom with a great political organization, the excavators say. "This is unequivocal evidence of a kingdom's existence, which knew to establish administrative centers at strategic points," read a statement from archaeologists Yossi Garfinkel of the Hebrew University and Saar Ganor of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). The IAA announced the finds as a seven-year long excavation at the site is wrapping up. The government agency and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority have halted the planned construction of a nearby neighborhood, hoping to make the site a national park. [In Photos: Archaeology Around the World] Garfinkel has previously said Khirbet Qeiyafa could be the site of Shaaraim, a biblical city associated with King David in the Bible. Shaaraim means "two gates" and two gates have been found in the fortress ruins. Others researchers, meanwhile, have claimed this site might be Neta'im, another town mentioned in the book 1 Chronicles in the Old Testatment. Prior radiocarbon analysis on burnt olive pits at the site indicated that it existed between 1020 B.C. and 980 B.C., before being violently destroyed, likely in a battle against the Philistines. Much of the palace was further wrecked 1,400 years later when a Byzantine farmhouse was built on the site. The archaeologists found a 100-foot-long (30-meter-long) wall that would have enclosed the palace, and inside the complex they discovered fragments of ceramic and alabaster vessels, some of them imported from Egypt. The researchers say the building was strategically located to overlook the city and the Valley of Elah. "From here one has an excellent vantage looking out into the distance, from as far as the Mediterranean Sea in the west, to the Hebron Mountains and Jerusalem in the east," the archaeologists said. "This is an ideal location from which to send messages by means of fire signals." The excavators also found a pillared building measuring about 50 feet by 20 feet (15 m by 6 m) that was likely used as an administrative storeroom. "It was in this building the kingdom stored taxes it received in the form of agricultural produce collected from the residents of the different villages in the Judean Shephelah," or Judean foothills, the archaeologists said. "Hundreds of large store jars were found at the site whose handles were stamped with an official seal as was customary in the Kingdom of Judahfor centuries." http://www.livescience.com/38318-king-david-palace-found-israel.html
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.