Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'fructose'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • English
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Topics
  • Vancouver, WA's Cerveza Craft y Community!
  • Jewelry's Topics
  • Missing Persons's Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Weekly Study Materials
  • Testigos de Jehová's Tema
  • Star Trek's Topics
  • Cadillac's Topics
  • Kitsap County, WA's Topics
  • Washington State's Topics
  • Cannabinoids's Topics
  • The English Language's Topics
  • Science and Faith's Topics
  • Peak Oil's Topics
  • Cryptocurrency and Blockchains's Topics
  • Jennifer Leann Carpenter's Topics
  • Consolidated Edison, Inc. Shareholders Club's Topics
  • Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc Shareholders's Topics
  • U.S. Veterans's Topics
  • Veeva Systems, Inc. Shareholders's Topics
  • Appian Shareholders's Topics
  • Chevrolet Volt's Topics
  • Nederlands's Topics
  • ελληνικά's Topics
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Topics
  • Tieng Viet's Topics
  • русский's Topics
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Topics
  • Polski's Topics
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Topics
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Topics
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Topics
  • Portugués's Topics
  • Testimoni di Geova's Topics
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Topics
  • Deutsches Forum's Topics
  • Gesundheit und Medizin's Topics
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Topics
  • Nouvelles du Monde's Topics
  • Noticias Mundiales's Topics
  • Salud y Medicina's Topics
  • Arte y Cultura's Topics
  • Estilo y Moda's Topics
  • Ciencia's Topics
  • Tecnología's Topics
  • Alimentos y Bebidas's Topics
  • Conversación General's Temas
  • Catolicismo's Topics
  • La Santa Biblia's Reina-Valera
  • Arqueología Bíblica's Topics
  • Catholicism's Topics
  • LDS's Topics
  • Judaism's Topics
  • Islam's Topics
  • Biblical Archaeology's Topics
  • Buddhism's Topics
  • Hinduism's Topics
  • Atheists's Topics
  • Scientology's Topics
  • The Holy Bible's Topics
  • The Holy Bible's King James Version (1611)
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Topics
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Russian Orthodox
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Greek Orthodox
  • Christians's Topics
  • Christians's Anglican Church
  • Christians's Seventh-Day Adventist
  • Christians's Baptist Church
  • Christians's Methodist Church
  • Korea 세계 포럼's Topics / 주제
  • Style & Fashion's Topics
  • The Faceberg's Topics
  • Amazon.com's Topics
  • Alphabet Inc.'s Topics
  • The Band Journey and Steve Perry's Topics
  • Airbnb's Topics
  • Luis Miguel's Topics
  • Tesla Motors's Topics
  • Climate Change's Topics
  • Doomsday Preppers's Topics
  • Architectural Intrigue's Topics
  • Health & Medicine's Topics
  • Automotive's Topics
  • Food & Drink's Topics
  • Arts & Culture's Topics
  • Creation of Jehovah God Truly Created in Wisdom!'s Topics
  • Real Estate's Topics
  • Real Estate's Listings
  • Aviation's Topics
  • I Grew Up in the 70's & 80's's Topics
  • Football's Topics
  • Space's Topics
  • Starbucks Coffee Club's Topics
  • Apple's Topics
  • Royalty's Topics
  • Nike's Topics
  • The Wonderful World of Disney's Topics
  • Portland, Oregon Metro Region (PDX)'s Topics
  • Nepal's Topics
  • China's Topics
  • Coca-Cola's Topics
  • India's Topics
  • Mexico's Topics
  • Christian Apologetics's Topics
  • Money & Business's Topics
  • Tiếng Việt's Chủ đề
  • Science and Technology's Topics
  • Saving $'s Deals, Coupons and Promo Codes

Categories

  • Files
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Files
  • Jewelry's Files
  • Support's Files
  • Missing Persons's Files
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Files
  • Testigos de Jehová's Archivos
  • Science and Faith's Files
  • Chevrolet Volt's Files
  • Nederlands's Files
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Files
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Files
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Files
  • The Holy Bible's Files
  • The Faceberg's Files
  • JW Sisters's Files

Categories

  • Records
  • Food and Drink
  • Health and Medicine
  • Religion
  • Español

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Events
  • Vancouver, WA's Event Calendar
  • Vancouver, WA's Events
  • Jewelry's Events
  • Missing Persons's Events
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Events
  • Testigos de Jehová's Calendario
  • Star Trek's Events
  • Cadillac's Events
  • Kitsap County, WA's Events
  • Washington State's Events
  • Cannabinoids's Events
  • The English Language's Events
  • Science and Faith's Events
  • Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc Shareholders's Events
  • Veeva Systems, Inc. Shareholders's Events
  • Appian Shareholders's Events
  • Chevrolet Volt's Events
  • Nederlands's Events
  • ελληνικά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Tieng Viet's Events
  • русский's Events
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Events
  • Polski's Events
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Events
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Events
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Events
  • Portugués's Events
  • Testimoni di Geova's Events
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Events
  • Deutsches Forum's Events
  • Gesundheit und Medizin's Events
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Events
  • Noticias Mundiales's Events
  • Salud y Medicina's Events
  • Arte y Cultura's Events
  • Estilo y Moda's Events
  • Ciencia's Events
  • Tecnología's Events
  • Alimentos y Bebidas's Events
  • Conversación General's Eventos
  • Catolicismo's Events
  • Arqueología Bíblica's Events
  • Catholicism's Events
  • LDS's Events
  • Judaism's Events
  • Islam's Events
  • Biblical Archaeology's Events
  • Buddhism's Events
  • Hinduism's Events
  • The Holy Bible's Events
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Events
  • Christians's Events
  • The Faceberg's Events
  • Amazon.com's Events
  • Alphabet Inc.'s Events
  • The Band Journey and Steve Perry's Events
  • Airbnb's Events
  • Luis Miguel's Events
  • Tesla Motors's Events
  • Climate Change's Events
  • Doomsday Preppers's Events
  • Architectural Intrigue's Events
  • Health & Medicine's Events
  • Automotive's Events
  • Food & Drink's Events
  • Arts & Culture's Events
  • Real Estate's Events
  • Aviation's Events
  • I Grew Up in the 70's & 80's's Events
  • Football's Events
  • Space's Events
  • Starbucks Coffee Club's Events
  • Apple's Events
  • Royalty's Events
  • Nike's Events
  • The Wonderful World of Disney's Events
  • Portland, Oregon Metro Region (PDX)'s Events
  • Nepal's Events
  • China's Events
  • Coca-Cola's Events
  • India's Events
  • Mexico's Events
  • Money & Business's Events
  • Science and Technology's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

Found 2 results

  1. The federal government’s decision to update food labels last monthmarked a sea change for consumers: For the first time, beginning in 2018, nutrition labels will be required to list a breakdown of both the total sugars and the added sugars in packaged foods. But is sugar really that bad for you? And is the sugar added to foods really more harmful than the sugars found naturally in foods? We spoke with some top scientists who study sugar and its effects on metabolic health to help answer some common questions about sugar. Here’s what they had to say. Why are food labels being revised? The shift came after years of urging by many nutrition experts, who say that excess sugar is a primary cause of obesity and heart disease, the leading killer of Americans. Many in the food industry opposed the emphasis on added sugars, arguing that the focus should be on calories rather than sugar. They say that highlighting added sugar on labels is unscientific, and that the sugar that occurs naturally in foods like fruits and vegetables is essentially no different than the sugar commonly added to packaged foods. But scientists say it is not that simple. So, is added sugar different from the naturally occurring sugar in food? It depends. Most sugars are essentially combinations of two molecules, glucose and fructose, in different ratios. The sugar in a fresh apple, for instance, is generally the same as the table sugar that might be added to homemade apple pie. Both are known technically as sucrose, and they are broken down in the intestine into glucose and fructose. Glucose can be metabolized by any cell in the body. But fructose is handled almost exclusively by the liver. “Once you get to that point, the liver doesn’t know whether it came from fruit or not,” said Kimber Stanhope, a researcher at the University of California, Davis, who studies the effects of sugar on health. Dr. Stanhope noted that while the liver may not know whether the fructose came from an apple or a soft drink, the way the liver processes that fructose could possibly be affected by some of the beneficial components in fruit. In contrast to soda, fruit contains fiber, vitamins, minerals and numerous other bioactive components. “We don’t know if and how these components may counteract the negative effects of fructose overload in the liver,” she said. The type of sugar that is often added to processed foods is high-fructose corn syrup, which is the food industry’s favored sweetener for everything from soft drinks to breads, sauces, snacks and salad dressings. Made commercially from cornstarch, high-fructose corn syrup is generally much cheaper than regular sugar. It contains the same components as table sugar – glucose and fructose – but in slightly different proportions. What about “natural” sweeteners? Food companies like to market agave nectar, beet sugar, evaporated cane juice and many other “natural” sweeteners as healthier alternatives to high-fructose corn syrup. But whatever their source, they are all very similar. To suggest one is healthier than another is a stretch, experts say. In fact, last month, the F.D.A. urged food companies to stop using the term evaporated cane juice because it is “false or misleading” and “does not reveal that the ingredient’s basic nature and characterizing properties are those of a sugar.” Is high-fructose corn syrup worse than regular sugar? How is it different? High-fructose corn syrup and regular sugar are so similar that most experts say their effects on the body are essentially the same. The main difference is that the variety of high-fructose corn syrup used in soft drinks tends to have more fructose. In one 2014 study, researchers analyzed more than a dozen popular soft drinks and found that many sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup – including Pepsi, Sprite, Mountain Dew, Coca-Cola and Arizona Iced Tea – contained roughly 40 percent glucose and 60 percent fructose. Regular sugar contains equal parts glucose and fructose. Why doesn’t the F.D.A. require that added sugars be listed in teaspoons rather than grams? When the new food labels go into effect, the daily recommended limit for added sugars will be 50 grams, or roughly 12 teaspoons, daily. (One teaspoon of sugar is 4.2 grams.) But the new food labels will list the amount of added sugars solely in grams. Many nutrition advocates have urged the F.D.A. to require that food labels list added sugars in both teaspoons and grams on food labels, arguing that Americans often underestimate the actual amount of sugar in a product when it’s expressed in grams alone. But the F.D.A. ultimately sided with the food industry, which opposed the teaspoon proposal. “It would be difficult, if not impossible, for a manufacturer to determine the volume contribution that each ingredient provides toward the added sugars declaration,” the agency said. “For example, a cookie made with white chocolate chips and dried fruit would have added sugars in the form of sugar in the batter as well as in the white chocolate chips and the dried fruit.” The F.D.A. also said that requiring both grams and teaspoons would “cause clutter and make the labels more difficult to read.” But Michael Jacobson, the president of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, an advocacy group that had petitioned the F.D.A. to require the teaspoon measurement, said the agency was under enormous pressure from the food industry, “which knows that consumers would be far more concerned about a product labeled 10 teaspoons than 42 grams.” So what’s the issue with added sugars? It mainly comes down to the way they’re packaged. Naturally occurring sugar is almost always found in foods that contain fiber, which slows the rate at which the sugar is digested and absorbed. (One exception to that rule is honey, which has no fiber.) Fiber also limits the amount of sugar you can consume in one sitting. A medium apple contains about 19 grams of sugar and four grams of fiber, or roughly 20 percent of a day’s worth of fiber. Not many people would eat three apples at one time. But plenty of children and adults can drink a 16-ounce bottle of Pepsi, which has 55 grams of added sugar – roughly the amount in three medium apples – and no fiber. Fiber not only limits how much you can eat, but how quickly sugar leaves the intestine and reaches the liver, Dr. Stanhope said. “You can’t easily eat that much sugar from fruit,” she said. “But nobody has any problem consuming a very high level of sugar from a beverage or from brownies and cookies.” Why is it a problem to have too much sugar? Many nutrition experts say that sugar in moderation is fine for most people. But in excess it can lead to metabolic problems beyond its effects on weight gain. The reason, studies suggest, is fructose. Any fructose you eat is sent straight to your liver, which specializes in turning it into droplets of fat called triglycerides. “When you ingest fructose, almost all of it is metabolized by the liver, and the liver is very good at taking that fructose and converting it to fat,” said Dr. Mark Herman, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard. Studies show a predictable response when people are asked to drink a sugary beverage: A rapid spike in the amount of triglycerides circulating in their bloodstreams. This also leads to a reduction in HDL cholesterol, the so-called good kind. Over time, this combination – higher triglycerides and lower HDL – is one major reason sugar promotes heart disease, said Dr. Aseem Malhotra, a cardiologist and adviser to the United Kingdom’s national obesity forum. This sequence of events may even overshadow the effects of LDL cholesterol, the so-called bad kind. “What many people don’t realize is that it’s triglycerides and HDL that are more predictive of cardiovascular disease than LDL cholesterol,” Dr. Malhotra said. “I’m not saying LDL isn’t important. But if there is a hierarchy, triglycerides and HDL are more important than LDL.” Dr. Malhotra said that when people reduce their sugar intake, “their overall cholesterol profile improves.” “I see this in so many of my patients,” he added. “The effects are rapid.” How much sugar is too much? One of the largest studies of added sugar consumption, which was led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that adults who got more than 15 percent of their daily calories from added sugar had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. For the average adult, that translates to about 300 calories, or 18 teaspoons of added sugar, daily. That may sound like a lot, but it’s actually quite easy to take in that much, or even more, without realizing it. A single 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola, for example, has almost 10 teaspoons of sugar; it can add up quickly. The study found that most adults got more than 10 percent of their daily calories from added sugar, and that for 10 percent of people, more than 25 percent of their calories came from added sugar. The biggest sources for adults were soft drinks, fruit juices, desserts and candy. While those might seem like obvious junk foods, Dr. Malhotra said, about half of the sugar Americans consume is “hidden” in less obvious places like salad dressings, bread, low-fat yogurt and ketchup. In fact, of the 600,000 food items for sale in America, about 80 percent contain added sugar. Everyone’s tolerance for sugar is different. Studies show, for example, that people who are already obese may be more susceptible to metabolic harm from sugar than others. But Dr. Malhotra said that he generally advises people to follow the World Health Organization’s guidelines, which recommend that adults and children consume no more than about six teaspoons daily of added sugar. “Could I tell you the exact limit where sugar starts to definitely impact cardiovascular health?” he said. “That’s difficult. But I think if people stick within the W.H.O. limits, then their risk is reduced.” Source: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/08/is-sugar-really-bad-for-you-it-depends/?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fhealth&action=click&contentCollection=health&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=1
  2. Scientists report that diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can reverse the damage Date: April 22, 2016 Source: University of California - Los Angeles Summary: Consuming fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, alters hundreds of genes that may be linked to many diseases, life scientists report. However, they discovered good news as well: an important omega-3 fatty acid known as DHA seems to reverse the harmful changes produced by fructose. A range of diseases -- from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer's disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases. However, the researchers discovered good news as well: An omega-3 fatty acid known as docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, seems to reverse the harmful changes produced by fructose. "DHA changes not just one or two genes; it seems to push the entire gene pattern back to normal, which is remarkable," said Xia Yang, a senior author of the study and a UCLA assistant professor of integrative biology and physiology. "And we can see why it has such a powerful effect." DHA occurs naturally in the membranes of our brain cells, but not in a large enough quantity to help fight diseases. "The brain and the body are deficient in the machinery to make DHA; it has to come through our diet," said Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a UCLA professor of neurosurgery and of integrative biology and physiology, and co-senior author of the paper. DHA strengthens synapses in the brain and enhances learning and memory. It is abundant in wild salmon (but not in farmed salmon) and, to a lesser extent, in other fish and fish oil, as well as walnuts, flaxseed, and fruits and vegetables, said Gomez-Pinilla, who also is a member of UCLA's Brain Injury Research Center. Americans get most of their fructose in foods that are sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, an inexpensive liquid sweetener made from corn starch, and from sweetened drinks, syrups, honey and desserts. The Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans consumed an average of about 27 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup in 2014. Fructose is also found is in most baby food and in fruit, although the fiber in fruit substantially slows the body's absorption of the sugar -- and fruit contains other healthy components that protect the brain and body, Yang said. To test the effects of fructose and DHA, the researchers trained rats to escape from a maze, and then randomly divided the animals into three groups. For the next six weeks, one group of rats drank water with an amount of fructose that would be roughly equivalent to a person drinking a liter of soda per day. The second group was given fructose water and a diet rich in DHA. The third received water without fructose and no DHA. After the six weeks, the rats were put through the maze again. The animals that had been given only the fructose navigated the maze about half as fast than the rats that drank only water -- indicating that the fructose diet had impaired their memory. The rats that had been given fructose and DHA, however, showed very similar results to those that only drank water -- which strongly suggests that the DHA eliminated fructose's harmful effects. Other tests on the rats revealed more major differences: The rats receiving a high-fructose diet had much higher blood glucose, triglycerides and insulin levels than the other two groups. Those results are significant because in humans, elevated glucose, triglycerides and insulin are linked to obesity, diabetes and many other diseases. The research team sequenced more than 20,000 genes in the rats' brains, and identified more than 700 genes in the hypothalamus (the brain's major metabolic control center) and more than 200 genes in the hippocampus (which helps regulate learning and memory) that were altered by the fructose. The altered genes they identified, the vast majority of which are comparable to genes in humans, are among those that interact to regulate metabolism, cell communication and inflammation. Among the conditions that can be caused by alterations to those genes are Parkinson's disease, depression, bipolar disorder, and other brain diseases, said Yang, who also is a member of UCLA's Institute for Quantitative and Computational Biosciences. Of the 900 genes they identified, the researchers found that two in particular, called Bgn and Fmod, appear to be among the first genes in the brain that are affected by fructose. Once those genes are altered, they can set off a cascade effect that eventually alters hundreds of others, Yang said. That could mean that Bgn and Fmod would be potential targets for new drugs to treat diseases that are caused by altered genes in the brain, she added. The research also uncovered new details about the mechanism fructose uses to disrupt genes. The scientists found that fructose removes or adds a biochemical group to cytosine, one of the four nucleotides that make up DNA. (The others are adenine, thymine and guanine.) This type of modification plays a critical role in turning genes "on" or "off." The research is published online in EBioMedicine, a journal published jointly by Cell and The Lancet. It is the first genomics study of all the genes, pathways and gene networks affected by fructose consumption in the regions of the brain that control metabolism and brain function. Previous research led by Gomez-Pinilla found that fructose damages communication between brain cells and increases toxic molecules in the brain; and that a long-term high-fructose diet diminishes the brain's ability to learn and remember information. "Food is like a pharmaceutical compound that affects the brain," said Gomez-Pinilla. He recommends avoiding sugary soft drinks, cutting down on desserts and generally consuming less sugar and saturated fat. Although DHA appears to be quite beneficial, Yang said it is not a magic bullet for curing diseases. Additional research will be needed to determine the extent of its ability to reverse damage to human genes. The paper's lead author is Qingying Meng, a postdoctoral scholar in Yang's laboratory. Other co-authors are Zhe Ying, a staff research associate in Gomez-Pinilla's laboratory, and colleagues from UCLA, the National Institutes of Health and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Yang's research is supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant R01DK104363), as is Gomez-Pinilla's (R01DK104363 and R01NS050465). Story Source: The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of California - Los Angeles. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160422091900.htm Americans get most of their fructose in foods that are sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, an inexpensive liquid sweetener made from corn starch, and from sweetened drinks, syrups, honey and desserts. The Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans consumed an average of about 27 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup in 2014. Credit: © AlenKadr / Fotolia

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.