Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'governments vs. religion'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • English
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Topics
  • Vancouver, WA's Cerveza Craft y Community!
  • Virtuality's Topics
  • Jewelry's Topics
  • AI's Topics
  • Missing Persons's Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Topics
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Weekly Study Materials
  • Testigos de Jehová's Tema
  • Star Trek's Topics
  • Cadillac's Topics
  • Kitsap County, WA's Topics
  • Washington State's Topics
  • Cannabinoids's Topics
  • The English Language's Topics
  • Science and Faith's Topics
  • Peak Oil's Topics
  • Cryptocurrency and Blockchains's Topics
  • Jennifer Leann Carpenter's Topics
  • Consolidated Edison, Inc. Shareholders Club's Topics
  • Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc Shareholders's Topics
  • U.S. Veterans's Topics
  • Veeva Systems, Inc. Shareholders's Topics
  • Appian Shareholders's Topics
  • Chevrolet Volt's Topics
  • Nederlands's Topics
  • ελληνικά's Topics
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Topics
  • Tieng Viet's Topics
  • русский's Topics
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Topics
  • Polski's Topics
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Topics
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Topics
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Topics
  • Portugués's Topics
  • Testimoni di Geova's Topics
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Topics
  • Deutsches Forum's Topics
  • Gesundheit und Medizin's Topics
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Topics
  • Nouvelles du Monde's Topics
  • Noticias Mundiales's Topics
  • Salud y Medicina's Topics
  • Arte y Cultura's Topics
  • Estilo y Moda's Topics
  • Ciencia's Topics
  • Tecnología's Topics
  • Alimentos y Bebidas's Topics
  • Conversación General's Temas
  • Catolicismo's Topics
  • La Santa Biblia's Reina-Valera
  • Arqueología Bíblica's Topics
  • Catholicism's Topics
  • LDS's Topics
  • Judaism's Topics
  • Islam's Topics
  • Biblical Archaeology's Topics
  • Buddhism's Topics
  • Hinduism's Topics
  • Atheists's Topics
  • Scientology's Topics
  • The Holy Bible's Topics
  • The Holy Bible's King James Version (1611)
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Topics
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Russian Orthodox
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Greek Orthodox
  • Christians's Topics
  • Christians's Anglican Church
  • Christians's Seventh-Day Adventist
  • Christians's Baptist Church
  • Christians's Methodist Church
  • Korea 세계 포럼's Topics / 주제
  • Style & Fashion's Topics
  • The Faceberg's Topics
  • Amazon.com's Topics
  • Alphabet Inc.'s Topics
  • The Band Journey and Steve Perry's Topics
  • Airbnb's Topics
  • Luis Miguel's Topics
  • Tesla Motors's Topics
  • Climate Change's Topics
  • Doomsday Preppers's Topics
  • Architectural Intrigue's Topics
  • Health & Medicine's Topics
  • Automotive's Topics
  • Food & Drink's Topics
  • Arts & Culture's Topics
  • Creation of Jehovah God Truly Created in Wisdom!'s Topics
  • Creation of Jehovah God Truly Created in Wisdom!'s Topics
  • Real Estate's Topics
  • Real Estate's Listings
  • Aviation's Topics
  • I Grew Up in the 70's & 80's's Topics
  • Football's Topics
  • Space's Topics
  • Starbucks Coffee Club's Topics
  • Apple's Topics
  • Royalty's Topics
  • Nike's Topics
  • The Wonderful World of Disney's Topics
  • Portland, Oregon Metro Region (PDX)'s Topics
  • Nepal's Topics
  • China's Topics
  • Coca-Cola's Topics
  • India's Topics
  • Mexico's Topics

Categories

  • Files
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Files
  • Virtuality's Files
  • Jewelry's Files
  • Support's Files
  • Missing Persons's Files
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Files
  • Testigos de Jehová's Archivos
  • Science and Faith's Files
  • Chevrolet Volt's Files
  • Nederlands's Files
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Files
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Files
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Files
  • The Holy Bible's Files
  • The Faceberg's Files
  • JW Sisters's Files

Categories

  • Records
  • Food and Drink
  • Health and Medicine
  • Religion
  • Español

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Need Graters looking for accommodation in Rural African Homes's Events
  • Vancouver, WA's Event Calendar
  • Vancouver, WA's Events
  • Virtuality's Events
  • Jewelry's Events
  • AI's Events
  • Missing Persons's Events
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses's Events
  • Testigos de Jehová's Calendario
  • Star Trek's Events
  • Cadillac's Events
  • Kitsap County, WA's Events
  • Washington State's Events
  • Cannabinoids's Events
  • The English Language's Events
  • Science and Faith's Events
  • Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc Shareholders's Events
  • Veeva Systems, Inc. Shareholders's Events
  • Appian Shareholders's Events
  • Chevrolet Volt's Events
  • Nederlands's Events
  • ελληνικά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά's Events
  • Tieng Viet's Events
  • русский's Events
  • Свидетели Иеговы's Events
  • Polski's Events
  • Świadkowie Jehowy's Events
  • Mga Saksi ni Jehova's Events
  • Testemunhas de Jeová's Events
  • Portugués's Events
  • Testimoni di Geova's Events
  • Zeugen Jehovas's Events
  • Deutsches Forum's Events
  • Gesundheit und Medizin's Events
  • Témoins de Jehovah's Events
  • Noticias Mundiales's Events
  • Salud y Medicina's Events
  • Arte y Cultura's Events
  • Estilo y Moda's Events
  • Ciencia's Events
  • Tecnología's Events
  • Alimentos y Bebidas's Events
  • Conversación General's Eventos
  • Catolicismo's Events
  • Arqueología Bíblica's Events
  • Catholicism's Events
  • LDS's Events
  • Judaism's Events
  • Islam's Events
  • Biblical Archaeology's Events
  • Buddhism's Events
  • Hinduism's Events
  • The Holy Bible's Events
  • Eastern Orthodoxy's Events
  • Christians's Events
  • The Faceberg's Events
  • Amazon.com's Events
  • Alphabet Inc.'s Events
  • The Band Journey and Steve Perry's Events
  • Airbnb's Events
  • Luis Miguel's Events
  • Tesla Motors's Events
  • Climate Change's Events
  • Doomsday Preppers's Events
  • Architectural Intrigue's Events
  • Health & Medicine's Events
  • Automotive's Events
  • Food & Drink's Events
  • Arts & Culture's Events
  • Real Estate's Events
  • Aviation's Events
  • I Grew Up in the 70's & 80's's Events
  • Football's Events
  • Space's Events
  • Starbucks Coffee Club's Events
  • Apple's Events
  • Royalty's Events
  • Nike's Events
  • The Wonderful World of Disney's Events
  • Portland, Oregon Metro Region (PDX)'s Events
  • Nepal's Events
  • China's Events
  • Coca-Cola's Events
  • India's Events
  • Mexico's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

Found 6 results

  1. WHAT DOES TRUMP THINK ABOUT PUTIN’S WAR ON RELIGION? BY ROMAN LUNKIN ON 8/12/17 AT 12:20 AM This article first appeared on the Wilson Center site. Just ten years ago, it would have been hard to imagine that the crackdown on civic activism in Russia would target religious communities, not just NGOs. And yet it is happening. The Russian state persecutes Baptists, Pentecostals, and Adventists and closes down Orthodox parishes that are not part of the Moscow Patriarchate. For the first time since the Soviet Union collapsed, preachers are now being fined for proclaiming GodÂ’s word outside church buildings. And a recent Supreme Court decision has opened the door to liquidating JehovahÂ’s Witnesses communities in Russia. “Traditional” versus “Nontraditional” Religions Russia divides all faiths into “traditional” and “nontraditional.” This concept, while absent from the Russian Law on Religious Freedom (although mentioned in the lawÂ’s preamble), has been introduced under pressure from the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) and Patriarch Kirill personally. Orthodox Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism are deemed “traditional,” while Old Believers, Catholics, various Protestant denominations, and many others are not. A member of the 'Union of Orthodox Banner-Bearers' takes part in a demonstration against the movie 'Matilda' in front of the Church of the Resurrection in Moscow on August 1, 2017. 'Matilda', a Russian movie about a love story between the last Russian Tsar Nikolay II and the ballerina Mathilda-Marie Feliksovna Kschessinskaya set for theater release in October, is believed by many Russians to insult the monarchy and offend religious sentiment.MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/GETTY The concept of traditional religions not only pits worshippers against each other, it also ignores the religious diversity of Russia. Today there are some 15 million practicing Orthodox believers in Russia, 10 million Muslims, 3 million Protestants, 500,000 Buddhists, 200,000 Jews, 175,000 JehovahÂ’s Witnesses, 100,000 Hindus, and 100,000 followers of other religious faiths (e.g., there are an estimated 10,000 Mormons in Russia). The ROC has usurped the right to a close relationship with the government and accuses Catholics and Protestants of proselytizing in the territory that it considers its own. As for Muslims, the ROC accepts as “traditional” only those who are loyal to the government. The ROCÂ’s concern is understandable. According to the Russian Ministry of Justice, ROC organizations are the most numerous in the country (around 16,000 communities), while Protestants and Muslims are second and third (5,000–6,000 communities each). However, polls show that Protestants and Muslims may be twice as numerous as official figures suggest. For example, evangelicals are now the second largest Christian denomination in Russia after Orthodox Christians in terms of numbers and presence throughout the country. In fact, in many regions of Siberia and the Far East, the number of Protestant communities and active parishioners is higher than the number of practicing Orthodox believers. In light of this, Patriarch Kirill has repeatedly urged the authorities in the Far East to “fight against sects” and support the Orthodox projects. Tightening the Screws The path toward tightening the screws on various non-traditional religions began in 2012, with the “foreign agent” law limiting the activity of foreign-funded noncommercial organizations. Furthermore, the law on meetings and demonstrations was also tightened. And in 2015 a new directive was introduced specifying that all religious groups must inform authorities of their existence. Then, in June 2016, the State Duma adopted a series of laws known collectively as the Yarovaya Law. Named after Duma Deputy Irina Yarovaya, who initiated it, the law amends Russian public safety and anti-extremism legislation. The part of the law that has already come into force and has received the broadest coverage consists of the statutes regulating liability for failure to report “extremist activity”—a very broadly defined set of activities under Russian law, ranging from calls for violence to the vague “incitement of racial, nationalist and religious hatred” and “propaganda of exceptionalism” based on religion or nationality. The part of the Yarovaya Law that has received much less attention is the provision imposing new restrictions on missionary work. The law now imposes a fine of 50,000 rubles on a private citizen for illegal preaching and up to 1 million rubles on a religious organization. Illegal preaching may mean preaching in a building that is not designated for such purposes and lacks proper signage. As a result, the police and the prosecutorÂ’s office now consider the activity of religious groups lacking official registration as illegal—a change from the recent past. Targeting JehovahÂ’s Witnesses The recent court proceedings against JehovahÂ’s Witnesses are a case in point. The campaign against JehovahÂ’s Witnesses began in 2009, during the still relatively liberal Dmitry MedvedevÂ’s premiership. In a number of cases the courts, relying on poorly and unprofessionally conducted evaluations, concluded that JehovahÂ’s WitnessesÂ’ literature could be defined as “extremist,” referring as it did to the faith as the only true faith. The adoption of the Yarovaya Law, therefore, opened the door to liquidating JehovahÂ’s Witnesses communities on the basis of their possessing “extremist” literature. On April 20, 2017, on the basis of the totality of these cases, the Russian Supreme Court ruled to liquidate the JehovahÂ’s Witnesses Management Center and all of the regional organizations. On July 17, 2017, a Supreme Court panel declined the JehovahÂ’s WitnessesÂ’ appeal, and the decision entered into force. The decision means prohibition of activity for over 400 JehovahÂ’s Witnesses organizations all over Russia and criminal prosecutions of more than 170,000 believers if they continue to gather and read faith publications and the Bible in their specific translation. (There are more than 2,000 groups engaged in this activity in Russia.) On top of that, because JehovahÂ’s Witnesses organizations are now judged “extremist,” the state is confiscating the professionÂ’s assets: 118 buildings in fifty-seven regions whose total value is 1.9 billion rubles. For the West, it was specifically the prohibition against JehovahÂ’s Witnesses that came to symbolize pointless religious discrimination in Russia and a drastic reduction of religious freedoms in the country. The EUÂ’s Office of Foreign Policy, the U.S. State Department, and the U.S. Helsinki Committee have all broadly criticized the move and called on Russia to rescind it. On top of that, JehovahÂ’s Witnesses has filed a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights. It is clear in advance that the judgment wonÂ’t be in RussiaÂ’s favor. Taking into account the losses sustained by the faithful, the fine that the Strasbourg court will impose on Russia for the benefit of JehovahÂ’s Witnesses may reach astronomical heights. The fact is, authoritiesÂ’ fight against nontraditional religions and religious denominations, which they peg as weird and scary sects, takes ugly, almost caricature forms. Journalists, politicians, and Orthodox activists accuse those of other faiths of activities that constitute the core religious activities of all faiths, including the ROC itself: collecting donations, engaging in prayers with emotional overtones, and instructing followers, including children, in the tenets of the faith. In the context of the massive anti-West hysteria, xenophobia, and search for spies, all of these generally normal activities become a crime. Most politicians and public figures, both conservative and liberal, readily jump on the bandwagon, portraying unfamiliar “sects” as threatening to the secular state and even citizensÂ’ psychological health. And the media ignore the persecution of those targeted under the Yarovaya Law. There are now more than 100 court cases challenging the imposition of fines against religious communities and individual faithful, yet they are proceeding unnoticed by the general public. Who Benefits? Many assume that the suppression of religious dissent automatically benefits the ROC. But that is not necessarily the case. Representatives of the Moscow Patriarchate are torn by irreconcilable contradictions. On the one hand, there are those who would like to prohibit all sects legislatively and in that way eliminate all competitors. (They are particularly troubled by the evangelicals in the Far East, who at this point exceed the number of the Orthodox.) On the other hand, many experts note that as soon as the word “sect” is introduced into the law, half the Orthodox communities could be prohibited. Rank-and-file priests and believers have stated that the anti-missionary statutes of the Yarovaya Law could also be used to prevent Orthodox sermons and missions among youth. In Russia, the gap is growing between the discriminated-against non-Orthodox Christians and the Orthodox, between the ROC bureaucracy and Orthodox activists of different persuasions, between the ROCÂ’s leadership and the pro-democracy-minded part of society, between the desires of law enforcement organs and the aims of the missionaries of different churches, including the ROC. These conflicts are getting sharper because Russian society betrays more civility than the Russian state. Ordinary Russians are much more tolerant of those professing different beliefs than are the police and the prosecutorÂ’s office. And the trend toward aligning the governmentÂ’s policy with the interests of the ROC produces a boomerang effect: civil society criticizes priests and bishops from the Orthodox standpoint, not from an atheistic one. This is why the state has decided to safeguard itself against independent religious authority by heavily regulating it. Roman Lunkin is Senior Researcher at Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences, head of the Center for Religious Studies in the Institute of Europe (Russian Academy of Sciences), a member of Russian team of Keston Institute (Oxford, UK) project “Encyclopedia of religious life in Russia Today”, editor-in-chief of the web-portal “Religion and Law” (www.sclj.ru), a public policy scholar in the Woodrow Wilson Center and the Kennan Institute (2011) and The Galina Starovoitova Fellowship scholar of the Kennan Institute (2017).
  2. Our Brother Bill Underwood wrote an interesting article in the newspaper: If you had to choose between Freedom of Religion and Freedom of Speech, which would you choose?Now, you’re thinking, ‘I don’t have to choose, I already have both.’ Are you sure?Last August, the central district court of Tver – the oblast or ‘state’ in which Moscow resides, banned a religious website, jw.org. They did this secretly, not notifying the owners of the website until the day before the ban was to go into effect – January 22, 2014. Had they prevailed, their rationale would have been to claim, as they have in the past, that the ‘free speech’ on jw.org defames other religions. Jw.org won that battle in the court of appeals, but the foundation on which the attack was based still exists.In 1999, Pakistan brought a resolution to the UN calling for a ban on “Defamation of Islam.” Cooler heads prevailed and, after much discussion, the Commission on Human Rights passed instead a resolution banning “Defamation of Religion.”Over the years from 2000 to 2009 the resolution was added to, revised, strengthened, and re-worded, but it was consistently approved. Aside from the lack of elections, U.N. politicians are no different from any other type. It would have been politically incorrect to be seen as anti-Muslim, especially after 9/11, so passing a bill to protect them from defamation seemed like a good idea. Typical was the vote of the UN General Assembly in December, 2007: 108 for, 51 against, and 25 abstaining.In 2009, however, Pakistan pushed again. Their resolution that year stated that they were concerned that defamation of religion led to “the creation of a kind of Islamophobia in which Muslims were typecast as terrorists." They weren't opposed to freedom of expression, oh no. They merely wanted to ban "expression that led to incitement.”They said the hatred of Muslims was just like the hatred of Jews that Hitler had whipped up in pre-WWII Germany, and look what that led to. Has there been a Muslim “krystallnacht” that I didn’t hear about...the night of August 9, 1938 when Germans destroyed over 7,000 Jewish businesses and over 1,000 synagogues? Even in the days after 9/11 when there was enormous outrage against Muslims, the level of hatred never approached that.Pakistan’s proposed resolution said basically that freedom of speech sometimes has to yield in order to maintain peace. Governments such as Russia, Pakistan, and most of the middle east are quick to use this argument: some opinion or expression of yours is causing distress to others; therefore, instead of telling the ‘others’ to grow up and get over it, they tell you to stop expressing your opinion.In any case, this was a step too far, and the pendulum began to swing back. Pakistan’s argument was recognized for what it was, and over 200 civic groups, some Muslim, some Christian, some atheist, demanded that the UN push back.Over the preceding 10 years, the UN had assigned a “special rapporteur” to analyze the subject of defamation of religion and report back. The rapporteur’s report in 2009 included this telling statement: “[We] encourage a shift away from the sociological concept of the defamation of religions towards the legal norm of non-incitement to national, racial or religious hatred." Three months later when the United States and Egypt introduced a resolution which condemned "racial and religious stereotyping," EU representative Jean-Baptiste Mattei said the European Union "rejected and would continue to reject the concept of defamation of religions." Significantly, he said: "Human rights laws did not and should not protect belief systems." And the representative from Chile pointed out that, "The concept of the defamation of religion took them in an area that could lead to the actual prohibition of opinions." A month later, at a human rights meeting in Geneva, the United States representative admitted that defamation of religion is “a fundamentally flawed concept.” The rep from Sweden repeated what the Frenchman had said earlier: international human rights law protects individuals, not institutions or religions.By 2011 the backlash was complete. The UNHRC declared that "Prohibitions of displays of lack of respect for a religion or other belief system, including blasphemy laws, are incompatible with” the charter of the Human Rights Committee.In the years since then, any proposal in the UN attempting to ban ‘defamation of religion’ has been shot down. Freedom of speech has trumped freedom of religion.Last week, far from worrying about ‘defamation,’ the UN came out loudly and publicly chastising the Vatican. This has never happened before. Their purported justification for doing so went like this: The Vatican is a signatory of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, article 34 of which reads in part: “Parties undertake to protect the child from all forms of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse.” The UN accused the Vatican not merely of failing to protect children, but of actively endangering children by their policy of moving pederasts to new parishes where they could continue their predations, and of obfuscating all attempts by law enforcement agencies to find and prosecute the offenders.Now, here’s where it gets really interesting: The UN went further. They also condemned the Church’s doctrines regarding homosexuality, abortion, and ‘reproductive rights.’Chastising a signatory of a contract for failing to abide by the contract is one thing; Attempting to dictate to a church what their doctrines should be is something else. Where is the UN’s authority to do that? Yet they did it anyway.If, as the UN says, religions and belief systems are not protected by human rights - and I agree, they clearly are not – what prevents them from taking the next step: deciding that religions and belief systems are nothing more than ancient superstitions that are doing more harm than good, and that it’s time to ban them?It’s too bad the UN doesn’t have any teeth. Do they? We'll Investigate that next. Bill.underwood@mail.com Source
  3. The similar demolition of a Catholic church last year is prompting Christians to worry that the central government will begin ordering the mass destruction of church buildings nationwide as new religious regulations go into effect next month. These regulations grant the Chinese Communist Party increased power over religion, paving the way for escalated persecution. according to ChinaAid Chinese Police Dynamite Christian Megachurch
  4. The heated language of Trump’s presidential campaign is affecting American Muslims, who find themselves increasingly on the receiving end of hate crimes. A year into TrumpÂ’s presidency, how will his words and decisions affect the countryÂ’s Islamic minority? We ask Trita Parsi, former informal Obama administrationÂ’s adviser and head of the National American Iranian Council.
  5. Macron to UN: "Our fight against terrorism is also a political, cultural, moral fight" Â
  6. The US leader's comments marked a change in tone after his sometimes anti-Islamic rhetoric during the presidential race. Trump urges Muslim leaders to 'drive out' terror Donald Trump has likened the fight against Islamic extremism to a battle between "good and evil" and not different faiths. Speaking to leaders from around 50 Muslim-majority countries in Saudi Arabia, the President attacked militants as "barbaric criminals who seek to obliterate human life". The US leader urge the nations to "confront Islamic terror of all kinds", deny sanctuary to extremists and stand together against the murder of innocent Muslims by groups like Islamic State. According to Mr Trump, "95% of the victims of terrorist attacks are themselves Muslims". He said America was seeking a "coalition of nations" in the Middle East with the aim of "stamping out extremism". Trump in Saudi: 'Tremendous progress tackling IS' He said the countries "cannot wait for American power to crush this enemy for them". Striking a conciliatory line, his comments marked a change in tone for Mr Trump after his remarks during the presidential campaign where he told the US: "Islam hates us." Addressing the Arab-Islamic American Summit in Riyadh, he said: "We now face a humanitarian and security disaster in this region that is spreading." Saudi King: 'Islam is the religion of peace' Mr Trump told leaders at the meeting that he brought "a message of friendship and hope and love", and urged Muslim countries to ensure "terrorists find no sanctuary on their soil". He announced a deal with Gulf countries to crackdown on the funding of extremists. The President also hit out at Iran, accusing Tehran of "fuelling the fires of sectarian conflict". He said among Iran's destabilising interventions was in Syria, where President Bashar al Assad has "committed unspeakable crimes". "From Lebanon to Iraq to Yemen, Iran funds, arms and trains terrorists, militias and other extremist groups that spread destruction and chaos across the region," Mr Trump said. Sky's Foreign Affairs Editor Sam Kiley said the President's comments "will be very much welcomed by the predominantly Sunni attendees from some 50 nations. "And it will strike a degree of horror into (Shia-dominated) Iran. "Terrorism is sponsored through groups like Hizbollah, by Iran, but there are also Sunni Islamic terrorist groups that the Iranians are fighting, not least Islamic State in Syria." Mr Trump also called upon countries around the world to work together to end the humanitarian crisis in Syria.
      Hello guest!

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.