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Found 7 results

  1. A set of identical twins brothers Itakke Usangnwan and Enyieokpon Usangnwan, last Saturday at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah of Witnesses in Uyo, Akwa Ibom wedded twin sisters Attah Abigail and Helen Obiofia. Abigail Attah wedded Itakke Usangnwan while Helen Obiofia wedded Enyieokpon Usangnwan. See their beautiful pre-wedding photos after the cut. Amazing! Twin Sisters Marry Identical Twin Brothers In Akwa Ibom(Photo)
  2. The wedding ring is one of the most common symbols of marriage known to man today, so common that most church-goers will condemn a Christian if he/she doesn't have one. However, where did this idea of wedding rings come from? It certainly isn't from the Bible because that's never mentioned in marriage. In fact, the first mention of a finger ring in the Bible comes from Egypt, a well-known source of paganism. And Pharaoh took off his ring from his hand, and put it upon Joseph's hand, and arrayed him in vestures of fine linen, and put a gold chain about his neck; -Genesis 41:42 It is the heathen nations that always put the emphasis on gold, silver, and fine jewelry, but Christians were not supposed to put emphasis on such things. The New Testament Scripture defines these things as vanity and pride. My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons. For if there come unto your assembly a man with a gold ring, in goodly apparel, and there come in also a poor man in vile raiment; And ye have respect to him that weareth the gay clothing, and say unto him, Sit thou here in a good place; and say to the poor, Stand thou there, or sit here under my footstool: Are ye not then partial in yourselves, and are become judges of evil thoughts? -James 2:1-4 In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefacedness and sobriety; not with broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array; -1 Timothy 2:9 So our modern society got it from the Catholic Church, who in turn got it from pagan tradition: " The wedding ring also has its origin in pagan times. According to the ancient Greeks, Prometheus [titan who created mankind] made the first wedding band out of smelted metal for strength and endurance. The unbroken circle was believed to signify the harmony of marriage... Modern-day adaptations of the many pagan rites have become big business! Photographers, jewelers, musicians, and florists have all prospered from ancient customs." -Abigail Kirsch, The Bride and Groom's First Cookbook, Doubleday, 1996, p. 4, ISBN: 9780385476355 This author, who was a popular medium/psychic (divination, necromancy, and sorcery), and a Catholic school teacher for 18 years, explains: "Our world is filled with pagan symbols--take, for example, the wedding band. It was believed that if bad luck came to a married couple, it would get trapped in a circle (the ring) , and it would just stay there, running in a circle for eternity." -Sylvia Browne, Secrets and Mysteries of the Word, Hay House Inc, 2006, p. 4, ISBN: 9781401922504 This witch author, whose books her husband stated has helped gay couples in their "marriage," says that pagan rituals can also call for astrological birthstones to be placed in the rings to give specific magical properties: "There are several ring choices besides the traditional engagement ring and wedding band that you see most often today. Read the following suggestions for different types of precious and semiprecious stones that you could incorporate into your engagement ring , wedding band, necklace, bracelet, or anklet, given here with their magickal properties ." -Kendra V. Hovey, Passages Handfasting: A Pagan Guide to Commitment Rituals, Adams Media, 2007, p. 145, ISBN: 9781440516368; Author's husband statements: [goodreads.com/review/show/893672232?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1] The wedding ring is esteemed in many witch covens above other jewelry for its "magick" properties: "In most cases, watches and random jewelry should be removed before practicing magick... Wedding rings are worn during the practice of magick, as they are considered sacred and blessed. " -Aislin, Ashling Wicca: Book 1, Lulu.com, 2012, p. 111, ISBN: 9781105350108 According to pagan sources, the "ring finger" that the wedding ring is supposed to adorn is based on what is called "palmistry," which is founded in witchcraft. "The Origin of the bridal bouquet goes all the way back to the ancient belief that strong-smelling spices and herbs would prevent evil spirits from ruining things. Her bridesmaids often follow suit, and even the flower girls have a specific role to shower all of the guests with petals from the chosen variety of flower. As Pagans, we are not limited to the colors, smells, and magickal uses of flowers . We can also incorporate the colors, smells and magickal uses of herbs. You are free to use traditional flowers, magickal herbs, or a combination of the two for a spectacular display of fragrance, color, and magick." -Kendra V. Hovey, Passages Handfasting: A Pagan The tradition of having a "flower girl" spreading out rose petals down the aisle of a typical wedding ceremony was taken from the Wiccan ceremony of casting spells in a magic circle known as "the rite of handfasting:" "Starting at the eastern-most point of where the circle will be cast, the Flower Girls (Maidens) each stand with a basket of rose petals ... The rose petals are a symbol of our Lady and the Flower Maidens a symbol of youth... When all is ready, the groom rings a bell, opens the book containing the wedding vows, and lights a candle to announce the beginning of the rite." -A.J. Drew, Wicca for Couples: Making Magick Together, Career Press, 2002, p. 126, ISBN: 9781564146205; Drew has authored many books on Wicca and hosts the annual Real Witches Ball for PaganNation.com. "Few people are aware that the wedding cake used in modern marriage ceremonies is a relic of the symbolic corn ears worn by the bride to ensure fertility in pagan times. These corn ears were replaced by cakes that were scattered over the newly married couple as they left the church. Thus we see how a subtle magical practice, in the form of the wedding cake, has become a central part of a religious or secular ceremony that allegedly has absolutely nothing to do with magic.[i.e. Church-goers deny its pagan roots.] The pleasant custom of sending pieces of the wedding cake to friends and relatives is also a modern expression of the traditional need to share with one's friends the magic of the corn spirit." The wedding cakes were even used in practices of divination: "The history of wedding cakes is quite long. These nuptial goodies have their origins in the ancient custom of couples ritually eating sacred foods during the marriage rite... Guests kept pieces of the cake, much as wedding guests of our own time take home slices for 'good luck.' In the Victorian era, unmarried English women placed pieces of wedding cake under their pillows for dreams of their future husbands ." -Scott Cunningham, Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Wicca in the Kitchen, Llewellyn Worldwide, 2012, ISBN: 9780738717111; Cunningham was a highly-respected 20-year veteran sorcerer, publishing more than 50 books around the topic of witchcraft. http://www.creationliberty.com/articles/marriage.php Divorce rate amongst Jehovahs Witnesses: https://www.jwfacts.com/watchtower/divorce.php
  3. Garry Lee and Nancy Diann Potter of Jacksonville celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary Saturday. Garry Potter and the former Nancy Diann Rawlings were married Sept. 30, 1962, at Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Jacksonville. They have one son, Kevin (wife, Desiree) Potter of Walland, Tennessee. They have one daughter, Kim (husband, Tom) Taylor of Watseka. They have three grandchildren, Ashley (Justin) Box of Walland, Brittany (Ben) Norgaard of Kentland, Indiana, and Cole Taylor of Watseka. They also have four great-grandchildren, Michael, Devin and Mason Box, all of Walland, and Addison Norgaard of Kentland. http://www.myjournalcourier.com/features/lifestyle/114521/potter-55th
  4. Alvin Mann and Gertrude Mokotoff exchanged vows on Aug. 5 before 50 family members and friends at Middletown City Hall in Middletown, N.Y. CreditJustin Gilliland/The New York Times Gertrude Mokotoff and Alvin Mann were introduced eight years ago at a gym in Middletown, N.Y., where they still work out twice a week. “A mutual friend said to me, ‘I’d like you to meet a very nice young lady,’” Mr. Mann recalled after chopping wood one recent morning at his mountaintop home in nearby Cuddebackville, N.Y. On their first date, he drove her to a restaurant in Middletown called Something Sweet. “He was a perfect gentleman,” she said, and he added, “There was something about her that made me want to keep on talking.” In a heartbeat, they became an item, talking about dreams and goals and sharing a life together. Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/fashion/weddings/senior-citizen-older-couple-wedding.html
  5. Jeni Stepien with Arthur Thomas after he walked her down the aisle at her wedding last Friday. CreditLauren Demby It’s a bittersweet wedding story a decade in the making: Nearly 10 years after Jeni Stepien’s father was killed, the man who received her father’s donated heart traveled from New Jersey to Pennsylvania to walk her down the aisle. “The murder and the wedding happened within a three-block radius” in the town of Swissvale, Pa., Ms. Stepien, an elementary schoolteacher, said in an interview on Monday, as she was about to board a plane for her honeymoon. “And I was just thinking, ‘My dad is here with us, and this man is here with us because of us.’ ” Bride Walks Down the Aisle With Man Who Was Saved by Her Father's Heart Donation Video by ABC News This story began in September 2006, when her father, Michael Stepien, was walking home from his job as head chef at a restaurant. Mr. Stepien, 53, was cutting through an alley when he was robbed at gunpoint by a 16-year-old, who shot him in the head at close range, she said. Leslie L. Brown was convicted of second-degree murder in the killing and is serving 40 years to life in prison, according to news reports. As her father lay dying at a hospital, Ms. Stepien said, her family “decided to accept the inevitable” and donated his organs through an organization called the Center for Organ Recovery and Education. The organization allows donor families and the recipients to keep in touch with one another after the transplant. Mr. Stepien’s heart went to Arthur Thomas, a father of four who lives in Lawrenceville, N.J., and who Ms. Stepien said had been within days of dying. Given a diagnosis of ventricular tachycardia about 16 years before receiving the transplant, Mr. Thomas, 72, said in an interview on Monday that he was in congestive heart failure when word arrived that his doctors had found a heart. “In order to get to the top of the transplant list, you have to be really hurting,” Mr. Thomas said. “Once I had my transplant, I, of course, decided I would write a thank-you to the family.” From there, a relationship was forged through monthly phone calls, emails and letters. Ms. Stepien’s mother, Bernice, kept in touch with Mr. Thomas, even swapping cards on Christmas and flowers on birthdays. At times, they compared parenting tips. But the families had not thought about meeting in person until Jeni Stepien, 33, became engaged to Paul Maenner, a 34-year-old engineer, in October. “One of my first thoughts in that following week was, ‘Who will walk me down the aisle?’ ” Ms. Stepien said. “I was thinking, ‘Oh, my gosh, it would be so incredible to have a physical piece of my father there.’ ” At her fiancé’s suggestion, Ms. Stepien wrote Mr. Thomas, whom the family calls Tom, asking him to walk her down the aisle. Mr. Thomas said yes, but only after running the proposition by his 30-year-old daughter, Jackie, he said. “She said, ‘I think it’s a wonderful idea,’ ” Mr. Thomas said of his daughter, who also recommended that he start practicing walking down the aisle. (He said he practiced once before the wedding.) Mr. Thomas, a retired college adviser who formerly worked at a boarding school in Lawrenceville, warned Ms. Stepien that his emotions might get the best of him. Ms. Stepien said she felt the same, and told him, “I’ll be right there with you.” The wedding took place on Friday in the church in Swissvale where Ms. Stepien’s parents were married. Mr. Thomas and the bride formally met one day earlier, when he suggested she grip his wrist, where his pulse is strongest. “I thought that would be the best way for her to feel close to her dad,” Mr. Thomas said. “That’s her father’s heart beating.” At the church, the bride was photographed touching Mr. Thomas’s chest. At the reception, they danced together, and guests mingled with Mr. Thomas and his wife, Nancy. The two families say they want to keep in touch and will plan a get-together somewhere down the road — maybe an event with a little less pressure. “I felt wonderful about bringing her dad’s heart to Pittsburgh,” Mr. Thomas said. “If I had to, I would’ve walked.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/09/fashion/weddings/bride-is-walked-down-aisle-by-the-man-who-got-her-fathers-donated-heart.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0
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