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Nicole

TSA Beats Up Half Blind Deaf Girl With Brain Cancer!

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and the courts say TSA screeners are "IMMUNE" from flier abuse claims.... wow

 

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      You dear older family and friends are not alone in your trials. Aged servants of Jehovah in Bible times faced similar challenges.
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      By Guest
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