Michael Krewson

What is a 'Budget'? Do I really need one?

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Queen Esther    5,620

A Budget is a quantitative expression of a plan for a defined period of time.  It may include planned sales volumes and revenues, resource quantities, costs and expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows. It expresses strategic plans of business units, organizations, activities or events in measurable terms.

A budget (derived from old French word bougette, purse)  is a quantified financial plan for a forthcoming accounting period.

A budget is an important concept in microeconomics, which uses a budget line to illustrate the trade-offs between two or more goods. In other terms, a budget is an organizational plan stated in monetary terms.

We  all  need  a  little  Budget...    you  too ! :)

Do you  know  *low  budgets*  movies ?  They're  making  with  few  money !  That  are  my  idea's  to  your  question.  I'm  sure,  you're  better  informed...

PS.  Money  has  NO  priority  by  JW....

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Guest Sonita   
Guest Sonita

Yo vivo con un presupuesto para los próximos meses. Me ayuda a dar prioridad a lo más importante y no gastar más de lo que debería. 

 

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Queen Esther    5,620
9 minutes ago, Sonita said:

Yo vivo con un presupuesto para los próximos meses. Me ayuda a dar prioridad a lo más importante y no gastar más de lo que debería. 

 

Una muy buena actitud y la solución! :)

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