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JAMMY

ANDRE RIEU SHOW

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Queen Esther    5,577
On 15.10.2016 at 15:08, JAMMY said:

The little girl in the audience is priceless!

 

Hahaha...  I  find,  the  *lady in red*  is  more  priceless !  Very  good  made  for  all  the spectators !  Especially  the  end  with the  bra ;-)

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