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London, England JW Convention - Fashion Show


The Librarian
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So ... whatever happened to "Quit being fashioned after this world"?

I am noticing this dress up fashion runway spirit taking off worldwide.

Whatever happened to dignified modesty in walking with our God?

- Just me venting.... I feel we have lost something with all of this new "openness"

They should spend more of their actually READING the bible and less time on outfits and video candy.

just 'sayin

 

 

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I can understand - and enjoy seeing - delegates wearing their national dress at conventions when that attire is still typical in their country, eg Africa, India.  What I have found weird is the donning of antiquated folk costumes such as lederhosen and that shown above, especially if it's not even an international assembly.  The westerners aren't turning up in pre WWI fashions.   A few years ago at a District Assembly I was bemused to see a sister from my own congregation in Australia dress

International convention? Albanian national dress? Yes, Librarian is a little grouchy today.  And what happened to the middle lady's other leg? Maybe that's why the Albanians are propping her up.

So ... whatever happened to "Quit being fashioned after this world"? I am noticing this dress up fashion runway spirit taking off worldwide. Whatever happened to dignified modesty in walking with our God? - Just me venting.... I feel we have lost something with all of this new "openness" They should spend more of their actually READING the bible and less time on outfits and video candy. just 'sayin    

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I can understand - and enjoy seeing - delegates wearing their national dress at conventions when that attire is still typical in their country, eg Africa, India.  What I have found weird is the donning of antiquated folk costumes such as lederhosen and that shown above, especially if it's not even an international assembly.  The westerners aren't turning up in pre WWI fashions.  

A few years ago at a District Assembly I was bemused to see a sister from my own congregation in Australia dressed in a sari when she doesn't have a drop of Indian blood in her.  

Since when have our conventions become a costume party?

So, yes, I'm with you Librarian.

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On 10/25/2016 at 6:25 PM, SuzA said:

I can understand - and enjoy seeing - delegates wearing their national dress at conventions when that attire is still typical in their country, eg Africa, India.  What I have found weird is the donning of antiquated folk costumes such as lederhosen and that shown above, especially if it's not even an international assembly.

I understand that TPT (Tight Pants Tony) is particularly "bothered" by Brothers in tight pants, so we should not stumble him with such outrageous displays of human depravity such as lederhosen.

He kinda lives in a bubble, and who knows how it might affect him.

 

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