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The Photo Drama of Creation - Charles Taze Russell

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The truth behind the longest films in history
The Photo-Drama of Creation

Movies opened up new possibilities for spreading information. Religious leaders quickly realized that they could get their messages out way faster through movies. One of the first religious movies, and the most spectacular, came from the Jehovah's Witnesses, who thought people wanted to watch 8 hour-long films.

Created by Charles T. Russell in 1914, The Photo-Drama Of Creation was a pseudo-documentary designed to fight atheism, unbelief, and "evil science." It was actually a series of 96 lectures, shown back-to-back. They followed the Jehovah Witnesses' view on history, starting with Earth's creation, and ending with the 1,000 year reign of Jesus Christ. The film itself was two miles long, projected next to a slide show of 500 slides, meaning some poor sap had to sit through the 8 hour affair, switching out all those slides.

Maybe the idea itself was kooky, but The Photo-Drama Of Creation was an important step in the history of film, being the first major motion picture to use speech synchronized to film. Pretty much all of our modern movies can trace their roots back to this oddball. And guess what? It has been uploaded to YouTube. All 96 parts.

    Hello guest!

The Photo-Drama of Creation (aka the Eureka-Drama in its abbreviated version), a 1912 religious production by Charles Taze Russell through the auspices of the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society (representing the Bible Student Movement), was the first major screenplay which incorporated synchronized sound (recorded speech), moving film, and magic lantern color slides. Since its run-time was 8 hours (480 minutes), the b/w show (with some hand-colored slides), providing a religious survey from the time of Creation to the end of the Millenium (the 1,000 year reign of Jesus Christ), was divided into 4-part sets. Multiple copies of sets were made so that it could conceivably be shown in 80 different locations at the same time. It was introduced at a premiere in January of 1914 in New York, and was later screened that summer in Germany. By the end of the year, it was estimated that 9 million people had seen the production in North America, Europe, and Australia.

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I have one on DVD that seems much better quality than the ones on youtube but I didnt think you could download a video from youtube, how does one do that?

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1 hour ago, bruceq said:

I have one on DVD that seems much better quality than the ones on youtube but I didnt think you could download a video from youtube, how does one do that?

Thats  easy,  bruceq :)  I  always  click  on  share  and  then  on  the  Facebook  button. You  also  can  share  it  to  your  email-address  or  other  social networks  you're  in !

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