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Happy 65th Mr. and Mrs. Waldron


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Raymond E. and Lilly A. Waldron of Temple celebrated their 65th anniversary with a week of dinners and receptions. Hosting the events were their sons, Tobiah Waldron and wife, Amber, and Barak Waldron and wife, Rebecca.

Lilly A. Buchner of Lansing, Mich., married Raymond E. Waldron on March 8, 1952. Stanly Krochmal officiated.

Mr. Waldron has been a minister of Jehovah’s Witnesses for 67 years and is also a building contractor of homes.

Mrs. Waldron is a homemaker and a member of Jehovah’s Witness for 70 years.

They were missionaries in Lima, Peru, in 1958-1959.

The couple has lived in this area for 17 years.

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