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Get ready for the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse! Find out what you’ll see based on location....

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If you can make it ... it will be something you will remember with awe the REST OF YOUR LIFE ... in great DETAIL ... WITH AWE AND REVERENCE.

Susan and I and my Sister's family are planning to go to Cross Hill, South Carolina, arriving in the early morning of Monday, August 21st, 2017.  This is the exact center of the path of the total eclipse that is impossible not to be able to find. 

We have already bought solar viewing glasses,  ( about $3.00 each), and I am going to buy a solar filter for my camera. We are taking a lunch and supper, as everywhere in a 70 mile wide path of the eclipse will be PACKED with people from all over America to see it.

 

 

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I'm thinking an Oregon beach would be the perfect place to watch this:

Screen Shot 2017-07-01 at 9.28.04 AM.png

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Only viewable in the USA this time around. Sorry.

solar-eclipse-map-today-170718_a1b1f7ee375d9f3a64569751f7fefc0c-1000x563.gif

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