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TheWorldNewsOrg

99 problems, but my computer ain’t one.

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The holidays are over, the New Year is here, and many of us are finding our wallets lighter and our pants tighter. The last thing we need is to “fix a problem we don’t have,” as ABC points out in its coverage of a new Better Business Bureau (BBB) report on tech support scams. Scammers apparently are more geared up than ever to take our money in exchange for "fixing" our already-functioning computers. If you think you’re insusceptible to the ruse, ABC disagrees, noting that the question is not whether, but when you will become a target of these widespread scams. So educate yourself for the inevitable: Read the BBB’s report on how scammers reach their victims (through pop-ups, calls, emails and internet search results) and check out the tips for impeding their access to our computers (not to mention our bank accounts).

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      https://www.quora.com/What-is-best-financial-scam-still-in-existence





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