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In popular usage outside the film industry, an "A-list celebrity" is any person with an admired or desirable social status. Even socialites with popular press coverage and elite associations have been termed as "A-list" celebrities. Similarly, less popular persons and current teen idols are referred to as "B-list" – and the ones with lesser fame "C-list". Entertainment Weekly interpreted C-list celebrity as "that guy (or sometimes that girl), the easy-to-remember but hard-to-name character actor".

"D-list" (or sometimes Z-list) is for a person whose celebrity is so obscure that they are generally only known for appearances as so-called celebrities on panel game shows and reality television. In the late 20th century, D-listers were largely ignored by the entertainment news industry;

I decided to start my own list of who I consider celebrities and in what ranking they are in according to $ and fame. Feel free to share your opinions with me as well and I will consider them.

A-List

Leonardo DiCaprio

Matt Damon

Keanu Reeves

Robert Downey, Jr.

Tom Cruise

Tom Hanks

Madonna

Elton John

Julia Roberts

George Clooney (Amal is with him)

Matthew McConaughey

Will Smith

Sandra Bullock

Johnny Depp

Brad Pitt

Ryan Gosling

 

A-List actors/actresses whose careers appear to be slowing down or even halted:

Nicholas Cage

Richard Gere 

Bruce Willis

Harrison Ford

Sir Paul McCartney

Jack Nicholson

Jim Carrey

Arnold Schwarzenegger

Mel Gibson

Cameron Diaz

Catherine Zeta-Jones

Michael J. Fox 

Jennifer Aniston

Arnold Schwarznegger

Sylvester Stallone

Kevin Bacon

Steve Martin

Eddie Murphy

Clint Eastwood

Bill Cosby...... What a fall from grace and soon to be on the list below. Sad story.

Oprah Winfrey.... She owns the media world... so I can't really say her career is in decline. But she isn't seen publicly as much as her TV days.

 

Now deceased: (A List)

Elvis Presley

Michael Jackson

Princess Diana

Marilyn Monroe

Prince

Christopher Reeves

 

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B-List 

Jack Hughman

Zac Efron

Christopher Walkens

Scarlett Johansson

Bill Murray

Dwayne Johnson

Jake Gyllenhaal

Anthony Hopkins

Antonio Banderas

Meghan Markle

Emma Stone

Sophie Marceau (My favorite French Actress)

Eva Mendes

Gal Gadot

Chris Pine

Michael Keaton

Charlize Theron 

Benedict Cumberbatch

Sophia Vergara

Michael Knight aka 

Janet Jackson

Sally Field

Morgan Freeman

Nicole Kidman

Kate Winslet

Rowan Atkinson

Ryan Reynolds

Channing Tatum 

Adam Sandler

 

 

Now deceased:

George Michael

Mary Tyler Moore

Dick Van Dyke

 

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D-List

Maria Menounos  (cinema ads)

Bianca Jagger

What is the name of Clint Eastwood's son again?

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Where should I place?

Drew Barrymore 

Martin Sheen

Charlie Sheen

Michael Douglas

Barbra Streisand

Cher

 

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Ok... help me out... who have I missed or placed wrong?

This list is just starting so I'm sure I've missed hundreds of good names.

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On 5/19/2018 at 2:03 PM, admin said:

@Chelita and @Nicole where should they be ranked? ?

Ryan Reynolds, Channing Tatum -A

Adam Sandler- B

 

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Guest

Dick Van Dyke - Deceased B list

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Guest

Add Jennifer Leann Carpenter from Dexter and Limitless now on Netflix. I would say she has made it up to at least the C list by now...and continues to climb. What do you think?

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