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Time gets slow for an object when the object moves nearly with the speed of light. Does time slow down even for light?


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I read somewhere that if push an object from here to outer space it will start going faster and faster. And then flame. Like an Asteroid. The stars are shining to us with or with out speed of light?:(

@James Thomas Rook Jr.                So, if you are traveling at the speed of light, in your car and you turn the lights on....what happens?

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Remarkably, the question cannot be answered.  Einstein's theory of relativity gives the rate of time in any "inertial frame" relative to that in any other inertial frame. (Inertial frames are traditionally called Lorentz frames, after the person who first introduced the transformation.) 

According to relativity theory, there is no inertial frame that travels at the speed of light. Therefore, according to our current theory, the question is fundamentally unanswerable. 

What we can say is this: compared to an Earth-bound clock, the clock in a frame moving at velocity v progresses at a slower rate.  In the limit as the frame velocity approaches the speed of light, that rate approaches zero.

But that does not mean that the value at c is zero. To do that, mathematically, you must first show that the limiting situation exists.  According to relativity theory, it does not. Some future theory might give a different answer, but in the present day, no alternative to relativity theory has made predictions that show it to be correct. 

Richard MullerProf Physics, UCBerkeley, author of "Now-Physics of Time" (2016)

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Translated into English ... time slows down as you approach the speed of light, and ON A PHOTON .... time is stopped.

You need to study "advanced and retrograde light", to get a better feel for this.

There is no such thing as "Universal Time Rate".

ALL time is a variable according to local velocity, and the strength of the gravity well.

 

All time is local.

Time passes at a different rate at the bottom of a tall radio antennae, than at the top ... because at the bottom ... there is more gravity, which slows local time.

 

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To get one single atom to the speed of light would require all the energy in the Universe ... so the headlight scenario is impossible, but if we delve into the realm of "Star Trek" fiction, perhaps you have made a "Photon Torpedo"!

The question is much like the famous  "Can God make a rock so big that even HE can't move it ?"

 

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