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Scientists find link between cat ownership and schizophrenia

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Scientists have discovered a link between people who own cats and the development of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, and believe a parasite may be to blame.

In a study published in the journal 'Schizophrenia Research', experts wrote that cat ownership is “significantly more common” in families where a child is later diagnosed with "schizophrenia or another serious mental illness”, the 

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By analysing a previously unused questionnaire of from 1982 filled in by 2,125 families that belonged to the National Institute of Mental Illness, scientists discovered that 50.6 per cent of people who developed schizophrenia owned a cat in childhood. These results were similar to two other studies in the 1990s, experts said. 

Around 1 in 100 people will experience schizophrenia in their lifetime, but it is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35, according to the NHS.

Schizophrenia is a long-term mental illness that can cause symptoms including hallucinations, delusions, and changes in behaviour.

And while the overall instance of schizophrenia from the study is low, scientists will now attempt to understand why this link exists. However, researchers believe that Toxoplasma gondii, a single-cell parasite present in some cats, may be the cause.

E. Fuller Torrey, a researcher from the Stanley Medical Research Institute who took part in the study, told the Huffington Post: “T. gondii gets into the brain and forms microscopic cysts. We think it then becomes activated in late adolescence and causes disease, probably by affecting the neurotransmitters.”

Mental Health Awareness: Facts and figures 

A previous study showed T. gondii can get inside the human brain by using a type of white blood cell in the immune system as a Trojan horse to enter the central nervous system.

Toxoplasma gondii can live in many different species but it can only complete its life cycle in cats, as the animals secrete the parasite in their faeces.

Studies have also revealed that Toxoplasma is beneficial to cats, in that it changes the behaviour of mice and makes them more likely to be eaten, thereby completing parasite’s complex life-cycle.

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This is old news, Librarian. The article I remember reading several year ago also highlighted women's heightened affinity to Toxoplasma, and it is a typical screening item for pregnancy because of it. It also was used to fin out why the old adage of "crazy old woman with cats."

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"thank you dear brothers and all the Jehovah's witness comunity worlwide for trying to protect us from bad cats !"

It's not the cats.

It's the parasites.  One reason for posting the article is to properly inform people. Try reading it. Against all odds, you might actually learn something.

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19 hours ago, Γιαννης Διαμαντιδης said:

thank you dear brothers and all the Jehovah's witness comunity worlwide for trying to protect us from bad cats !

Indeed. 

Are Cats For True Christians? - 

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Hahahaha.....   cats  are  animals  and  humans  are  not  animals !   Aninmals  are  allowed,  eating  other  things  than  humans.  Many  animals   like  some  of  humans  food  too,  but  normal  they've  their  own  food. WHAT  is  with  cat ownership and schizophrenia  -  to  a  dog  ownership  and  schizophrenia  or  other  animals ?  I  can't  believe  this  curious  study.  Scientists  so  often  not  honest  with  their  statements !  Moreover, cats  are  very  very  clean  animals !!  Perhaps  it  gave  some  weird  cases,  but  I  always  rethink  all  for  myself,  not  believe,  what  everybody  is  saying  ;o)   --------   Btw....  I  had  a  nice  clever  cat,  long  14 years !    I  missed  her  a  long  time  ;-(

My  next  animals  I  want  in  the  NW ❤  ( not  yet )

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